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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,427
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

[ Edited ]

@kate2357wrote:

@Foxxeewrote:

Those getting into what some say is a pagan precursor of Christmas, at one point "Yule," may I suggest reading the history of Christmas carefully.

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There's no mistake what the word Christmas means.

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One of the problems as I see it from the War On Christmas army is calling all other holidays their rightful names, except Christmas day. It is Happy Holiday. All others, Happy Thanksgiving, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year. They choke on Merry Christmas. It's very obvious what they are up to.


Not it's not obvious. Why must there be a nefarious reason behind saying happy holidays when you are in public or speaking to an audience of people you don't know or know well? If I am out at a store or a doctors office etc., I have zero idea what holiday(s) that person may celebrate. So I say thank you, happy holidays! If I know the person, I will specify the holiday, be it Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, etc.

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There is no war on Christmas. It was a fabricated effort to divide us. I refuse to fall for faux outrages.

@kate2357I agree. I view "Happy Holidays" coming from someone as being inclusive and respectful of other holidays that occur during the same season as Christmas...nothing more.

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I am not sure who "they" are that are at war with Christmas.


"Justice will not be served until those who are unaffected are as outraged as those who are." BF
Trusted Contributor
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Registered: ‎10-26-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

@kate2357 - Agree with everything you said 100 percent! I do the same. If I know what holiday someone celebrates, I specifically mention it. If not, it's Happy Holidays. I would never be offended if someone wished me that instead of Merry Christmas...it's not even on my radar! If someone is wishing me something with good intentions, what is there to be upset about?
Esteemed Contributor
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Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

@Mersha

I wondered the same thing with this sentence "It's very obvious what they are up to." Who? Why? Source?

"What we practice daily is what we build a life on. Practice peace, love & kindness."
Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

I bet the vendor was trying to be inclusive of all the celebrations people have instead of singling out one. If he had said Merry Christmas, how would people feel who celebrate any of the other 7 or so?He's just trying to sell something to everyone. So instead of making others feel left out he just said on holiday morning, which sounds a little awkward but he was trying.

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I had a friend who was Jewish and they had a gift every day from the start of Hannukah, including on the 25th.

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And I think what so many have said -

if we don't know or are trying to include many, Happy Holidays is nice. If I know what they celebrate I'll say it-Merry Christmas or Happy Hannukah or Happy Kwanza or if they don't celebrate anything maybe I'd say have a wonderful December!

Can't we all be inclusive and wish anyone and everyone a safe and happy___ (include whatever they celebrate)?💖

Think like a dog-they celebrate everyone unless someone is mean to them and even then they can forgive.

"If you walk the footsteps of a stranger, you'll learn things you never knew. Can you sing with all the voices of the mountains? can you paint with all the colors of the wind?"
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Registered: ‎05-08-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase


@Susanp301wrote:

Yes there would be a holiday morning without Christmas for those of us who do not celebrate Christmas. For me it would be Hanukkah which happened well before Christmas. QVC has spent the past 6 months pushing Christmas to the exclusion of almost anything else. Acknowledging other holidays won't hurt those who celebrate Christmas. I am offended by your premise.


Sorry, but there is no Hanukkah "morning" or Kwanzaa "morning." "Christmas morning" is the "holiday morning" the vendor was trying so hard to avoid saying. Judaism itself regards the 8 days of Hanukkah as a minor religious holiday (unlike, say, Passover and the Jewish new year). Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday at all -- it means "first fruits" and was declared by a Cal State professor in 1966 to honor for a 7-day period what he deemed to be the 7 principles of African life.

People are free to celebrate whatever holidays they like. But only the narrow-minded invoke "inclusiveness" to justify their decision to be offended by references to "Christmas morning."

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,463
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Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

[ Edited ]

No, I think we can be inclusive and also love Christmas. For me Christmas is my favorite day and time of the year and has always been. It's a time for me when my family especially ones not often seen can get together and love each other.

It does seem a time when so many think more of how to be kind to others, just like who we are celebrating did to others,not just a certain group. It is a magical time of the year. I wish it could be Christmas every day.

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For me being exclusive or offended by how people give a greeting is not what Christmas is all about.

"If you walk the footsteps of a stranger, you'll learn things you never knew. Can you sing with all the voices of the mountains? can you paint with all the colors of the wind?"
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,168
Registered: ‎05-08-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase

[ Edited ]

@Mershawrote:

@kate2357wrote:

@Foxxeewrote:

Those getting into what some say is a pagan precursor of Christmas, at one point "Yule," may I suggest reading the history of Christmas carefully.

*

There's no mistake what the word Christmas means.

*

One of the problems as I see it from the War On Christmas army is calling all other holidays their rightful names, except Christmas day. It is Happy Holiday. All others, Happy Thanksgiving, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year. They choke on Merry Christmas. It's very obvious what they are up to.


Not it's not obvious. Why must there be a nefarious reason behind saying happy holidays when you are in public or speaking to an audience of people you don't know or know well? If I am out at a store or a doctors office etc., I have zero idea what holiday(s) that person may celebrate. So I say thank you, happy holidays! If I know the person, I will specify the holiday, be it Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, etc.

.

There is no war on Christmas. It was a fabricated effort to divide us. I refuse to fall for faux outrages.

@kate2357I agree. I view "Happy Holidays" coming from someone as being inclusive and respectful of other holidays that occur during the same season as Christmas...nothing more.

------

I am not sure who "they" are that are at war with Christmas.



@foxee was quite specific, @Mersha . "They" are those who "call all other holidays their rightful names, except Christmas day. It is Happy Holiday. All others, Happy Thanksgiving, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year. They choke on 'Merry Christmas.' "

Respected Contributor
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Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase


@kate2357wrote:

@Mersha

I wondered the same thing with this sentence "It's very obvious what they are up to." Who? Why? Source?


Surprised you wondered, @kate2357. Perhaps you missed the sentences that preceded it, in which she explained that "they" are those who "call all other holidays their rightful names, except Christmas day. It is Happy Holiday. All others, Happy Thanksgiving, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year. They choke on 'Merry Christmas.' "

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,168
Registered: ‎05-08-2010

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase


@Kachina624wrote:

@kaydee50Christmas was first celebrated in AD 336 but Hanukkah has also been around a mighty long time. I don't think Christians can claim exclusivity to the holidays. Anyone can celebrate anything they want anytime they choose. It can be just as meaningful to them as Christmas is to you.

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The origins of Hanukkah Hanukkah commemorates a historical event that took place in Jerusalem in the 2nd century BCE, when the Seleucid Greek empire was the ruling power.


Christmas was first celebrated on the day Christ was born. The persecutions began with King Herod, who slaughtered dozens of male Jewish infants two years old and under in an effort to kill the Christ child. The persecutions continued for centuries thereafter (think the beginning of the catacombs), forcing Christians to commemorate the birth of Christ in secret. You are correct that Christmas was again publicly celebrated in the first half of the 4th century after Constantine decided to recognize Christianity, but unlike his mother, St. Helena, he was not a staunch defender, and the persecutions resumed.

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Posts: 6,021
Registered: ‎02-26-2012

Re: "On Holiday Morning" phrase


@vsmwrote:

@kate2357wrote:

@Mersha

I wondered the same thing with this sentence "It's very obvious what they are up to." Who? Why? Source?


Surprised you wondered, @kate2357. Perhaps you missed the sentences that preceded it, in which she explained that "they" are those who "call all other holidays their rightful names, except Christmas day. It is Happy Holiday. All others, Happy Thanksgiving, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy New Year. They choke on 'Merry Christmas.' "


Sorry, still don't know who they are and what they are up to. I've also never heard anyone choke on saying Merry Christmas. What is it they are choking on? Why attach a nefarious reason for other people's attempt on being polite? Why assume what others are feeling?

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As for a TV vendor or salesperson saying holiday morning, why assume anything other than they are trying to sell to a wide audience? Maybe not everyone know specifics about how all holidays are celebrated.

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I just cannot get worked up over how other people chose to wish me well. Good intentions count with me and I'm not going to feign an outrage I don't feel.

"What we practice daily is what we build a life on. Practice peace, love & kindness."