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Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: Underpinnings?

[ Edited ]

I try not to criticize how a person chooses their words to convey a message or idea. I grew up in a bilingual family where English was not the primary language and I learned English in school but at home it was different. I was often made fun of because of the words I chose or how i pronounced them. I wonder if AS came from a similar situ.

 

My mom bought a new Toyota car one time and she called it an "Uplift". The model was actually called a "Lift-back'...lol! We all got it but it was funny.

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Re: Underpinnings?

[ Edited ]

@PA Mom-mom wrote:

@FranandZoe  I don't remember the exact quote, but in the film "Ball of Fire," Gary Cooper (Prof. Potts) refers to the "rather uninspired? underpinnings of Miss Bragg." Miss Bragg was the stout matron of the bachelor abode of the professors writing a dictionary. He was comparing her to the very attractive Barbara Stanwick's Sugarpuss O'Shay. I think he was referring to her legs.That's the only time I can recall hearing the word used to anything like that.


@PA Mom-mom 

That's a British term for legs:  Pins and underpinnings are stiff structured things so it could be for jeans, if she has someone in her household who is speaking in the old British language.  I think even Lady Di called them that.

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@Bookplate    I saw those technical terms too.  I think the word evolved in the early 20th Century to include all of a lady's underwear.  I certainly never used the term but I've often read it in books and heard it in theatrical productions

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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In dressmaker terms an underpinning is something you pin to the underside of a garment to give it structure, shape or form. 

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@rms1954    When I tried to message her on Facebook to tell her how to pronounce ochre, there was no way to send comments to her.  I'm not a Facebook whiz.  Remember when she always called it okra?

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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My husband insists on using the non-word dwadle instead of dawdle.

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@Icegoddess wrote:

My husband insists on using the non-word dwadle instead of dawdle.


I have a list of words mine insists on mispronouncing.  I keep correcting him but he does it now just to annoy me. 

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@MezzieStarr Thanks for posting the dictionary info.   I knew the most common use of the word, but not the final definition listed.  (First new fact of the day for me since I'm still catching up on yesterday!)

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@rms1954 wrote:

@Kachina624 wrote:

Amy seems to lack the basic understanding of many words an educated person should know.  Unfortunately, there's no way of telling her she's mistaken, even on her Facebook page.  So she duplicates the same error repeatedly.


I actually sent her a message on FB letting her know it was not "in this day of age" as she repeatedly kept saying, and it's "in this day and age."  She responded "Well son of a gun.  thank you.  I had no idea." 


 

 

Seriously?  You went to the bother ?  LOL

 

I don't really care about a host's lack of grammatical etiquette....I care more about seeing the colors, hearing the fabric content, sizing etc.

 

The rest is just babble and doesn't resonate with me at all.

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Registered: ‎03-14-2010

I always thought it was underwear.  It's not a word I generally use.