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Frequent Contributor
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Registered: ‎01-16-2018
I've noticed lately that some of Jay's bigger turquoise rings are COMPOSITE! Same thing on JTV so buyer beware.
Honored Contributor
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Re: Jay King

@catnappurr  Do you have a current source for largish turquoise stones?  I'm not buying much nowadays, but I do love turquoise and I don't like dainty on me.

 

 

Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Jay King

@catnappurr.  Many of Jay's turquoise pieces have been composite for a long time....years.  Look closely at what you've purchased and if you see lumps and pieces, that's composite.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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Re: Jay King

Almost all turquoise is enhanced with resin and sometimes with chalk too.  This stone is very porous  and has nooks and crannies that makes it week.  Chalk is used to fill in the crannies and then resin is applied to the stone.

 

The resin is absorbed into the stone and makes it stronger.  Poor quality turquoise has more chalk and resin in it, where as a better quality stone has less.

 

Composite turquoise is small stones put together to create a larger stone.

 

Both types of turquoise are considered to be genuine turquoise by industry standards.

 

There is nothing negative or misleading about composite turquoise.  Why buyer beware??

 

 

Honored Contributor
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Re: Jay King

[ Edited ]

@CARMIE.  Beg to differ but composite turquoise is not found in quality turquoise jewelry.  I don't see any of it when shopping in stores in Albuquerque  and Santa Fe.  Stabilization is common because of the porous nature of turquoise but usually nothing like chalk or dyes are not used.  So many of these adulterations seem to be creations of TV shopping channels.  Included are turquoise in the God-awful colors of chartreuse green, purple, red, etc which are man-made dyed composites often now mixed with copper.  These are called "Mojave" turquoise and are the creation of the owner of the Kingman Mine.  Hideous. 

There are natural turquoise stones from certain mines that do contain pyrite (which looks like gold) but in these times they're few and far between.

 

The question one needs to ask the seller of a piece of turquoise is, "is it a natural stone?"  To me, there's a lot wrong and misleading about selling composite without labelling it as such.  People don't expect the stones in their jewelry to be a manufactured product and buy it assuming it's a natural stone.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,903
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Re: Jay King

I also don't think composite turquoise is a better quality or even an equal quality than stabilized turquoise. It is just considered genuine turquoise and can legally be sold as such.

 

Composite stones of any kind are less expensive than those whole piece quality stones.  There nothing wrong with jewelry made with composite stones.  Most opals are composite and they are expensive.

 

You can't expect to pay a low price on a shopping channel for large first quality stones.  As with anywhere else you shop, those stones are expensive and rare.  Most people just want a jewelry piece that they like, can afford and enjoy.  There is nothing wrong with that.

 

I have personally seen some handmade quality jewelry made with composite stones.  There is so much more to quality jewelry than the stones.  The gold and silver used, the talent of the artisan and the rarity of the piece and stone all play a big part in the price and quality. 

 

Have you ever ever see the jewelry made by Ben Nighthorse in person?  He sometimes uses composite stones and his pieces are amazing and breathtaking ...and expensive.  

 

 

Honored Contributor
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Re: Jay King

@CARMIE.  Actually I have a Ben Nighthorse ring.  He has a factory-like operation (or did have) and churns out jewelry like they do in China.  Ray Tracey is another Indian with the same type of operation but they make some very expensive inlay.  He's also an actor who has appeared in several movies, very good looking.

 

I have never seen composite anywhere except on the shopping channels.  It sure isn't used in fine jewelry as those customers know their stuff.  Fine stones are available for those willing to pay for them.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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Honored Contributor
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Re: Jay King


@Kachina624 wrote:

@CARMIE.  Actually I have a Ben Nighthorse ring.  He has a factory-like operation (or did have) and churns out jewelry like they do in China.  Ray Tracey is another Indian with the same type of operation but they make some very expensive inlay.  He's also an actor who has appeared in several movies, very good looking.

 

I have never seen composite anywhere except on the shopping channels.  It sure isn't used in fine jewelry as those customers know their stuff.  Fine stones are available for those willing to pay for them.


My DH has a Ben Nighhourse ring that was handmade. He has had it for years.  It cost more than my engagement ring.

 

I have seen a bracelet or two that I wanted, but too expensive for me.... 5 to 6k is more than I want to spend.  I have never personally  seen any of his new factory made stuff, only jewelry personally made by him one piece at a time....really unique things.

 

i guess if you have the money, you can buy just about anything you wish.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎01-16-2018

Re: Jay King

You are right! Who wants to pay top dollar for turquoise that has been bonded and glued together? I lived in New Mexico and you won't find that junk in Santa Fe at the Santa Fe Plaza where all the natives sit and sell there jewelry! Stabilization is FINE but epoxy glue and dye shouldn't be allowed.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎01-16-2018

Re: Jay King

Also stay away from reconstituted turquoise.
Its turquoise in the form of chalk and is crushed into dust and mixed with plastics, dyes, and resins to form the compound known as reconstituted turquoise. Using machines and special techniques, the factories can create matrix looking patterns such as the spider web to make the finished product look more natural. Reconstituted turquoise also has a plastic look and feel to it but I haven't seen any sold on any of the shopping channels!