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Valued Contributor
Posts: 850
Registered: ‎06-20-2015

Anyone own a bunny?  Are they good pets?  Do they need exercise?  Do they run away?

 

Rabbit.jpg

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,717
Registered: ‎05-01-2010

Those are not outdoor or wild rabbits. They need to be kept inside. Contact your local animal shelter and they will tell you about them. Those bunnies should not be sold by pet stores around Easter. They require the same care as a cat or a dog. A commitment.

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 43,326
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

You can find tons of information about rabbits on the Internet.  Please become familiar with their needs before becoming a bunny parent.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,759
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Show me the bunny

[ Edited ]

Please don't even consider bunnies or chicks for Easter gifts. 50 (or more)  yrs ago I did and I really Thank God my to be son-in law  was into rabbit farming and took them once the fun was over with my kids........

 

They poop all over the house ,should you let them  run free inside.

 

They love eating clover ,which is rare in your lawn.

 

They multiply like crazy.

 

My SIL got to have a huge rabbit farm in PA,just  from the 2 I gave him.

 

the farming is not a popular as it once was yrs ago  .My SIL just passed away last month and my grandaughter  has had a problem closing  the farm down. 

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,024
Registered: ‎01-10-2013

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-wsG1Iio9Mzo/Uxns3BsnsXI/AAAAAAABiOQ/M2JI83GYjSc/s1600/Happy+Easter+Gif+3.jpg

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,175
Registered: ‎05-08-2010

I always cringe when I hear of someone getting a pet around a holiday.  I may be misjudging the situation, but I always feel that this is an idea that hasn't been thought out considering the lifetime of the animal and the committment that goes along with it.  It is more about the BIG SURPRISE of the "day". 

 

If you are going to commit to pet ownership, think it through, do your research, then think about it some more.  It can't be a snap decision.  I don't know if this is what you are doing because I don't know you or your situation.  For others that are considering a pet purchase, read the above. JMHO

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Super Contributor
Posts: 467
Registered: ‎07-02-2011

I had a bunny for seven years, who sadly passed on two years ago.  She was a sweet thing but had a mind of her own. Rabbits have very particular personalities- my girl had no trouble telling me what was what!  She was not a cuddler but would come over to me and nudge for nose rubs.  Such a cutie.   

 

Now having said that I must warn you that bunnies are just as much if not more work than having a dog or a cat.  And while some bunnies get along peacefully with dogs and cats I would not recommend it.  I have a dachshund now and would never get a bunny as my puppy has a prey instinct and I cannot see that ending well.  My bunny was litter box trained for number 1 but not number 2.  Little pellets everywhere! And the ammonia smell with the litter box was strong- just saying, prepare yourself for frequent box cleaning.  My bunny used to chew wires too, so rabbit proofing is essential. She was a 100% indoor bunny. Do not keep them always in a cage they need excercise (and supervision)

 

Would I get another bunny someday?  You bet they are wonderful little creatures.  But just wanted to provide some full disclosure on the work involved.

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Super Contributor
Posts: 405
Registered: ‎05-12-2010

I have 3 house bunnies who are litter trained.  Rabbits are a LOT of work, but if you really love them they are great pets.  They do not belong outside at all, and they are expensive to maintain (you need hay, bedding, food pellets, and fresh produce).  Please do not buy a bunny from feed stores or breeders--they are often diseased and in poor health, or taken from their mothers way too soon.  If you get one from a shelter they will already be vetted and often spayed/neutered.  An uns[ayed/neutered bunny will urinate and deficate everywhere to mark their terrirory.  

 

You will need to find a vet who handles exotics.  Rabbits are considered an exotic pet and they will definitely need medical care.

 

Bunnies do not like to be off the floor.  They enjoy you sitting on the floor with them to pet them, but hate being picked up.  They are not a good choice for children because they are quite delicate creatures.  Sometimes they will bite when handled by children, especially if they aren't fixed.

 

That said, I will have bunnies forever because they are my pet of choice.  Once a bunny loves you it always will <3  Rabbit dot org has all the information you need as well as links to adoptable bunnies.

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Regular Contributor
Posts: 174
Registered: ‎03-05-2018

IMG_0271 2.jpgIMG_0747.jpgIMG_0271 2.jpg

 

Cupcake, a very very sweet miniature lop earred bunny who we were blessed to share our home with for 5 years.

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,814
Registered: ‎07-03-2013

Years ago, I had a co-worker that had a bunny.  She kept it in a huge cage in her dinning room.  She thought it was the best pet.  She had it for a lot of years.