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Contributor
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎04-13-2017
Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I'm sure that dogs remember what went on in their past. LAPDOG...I did read somewhere to put on soft classical music. I did that today and it did seem to help. When I opened the door he was standing by the door but he wasn't whining. I think it'll take a long time for him to realize that I'll always come back but we'll keep working on it😍
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Registered: ‎09-18-2015

You might try going out of the room for just a few minutes, then return and if he's behaving as you desire, reward him.  Good dog! Is often enough.  A few exits with varying length of absence and positive reinforcement should help.  If he whines, ignor it but don't reward it, even with your voice.  He will learn that you  do return plus how to earn his reward with good behavior!  Good Luck!

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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Susan423, I would also suggest short car rides once or twice a week for you and your dog so when it is time for a trip to the vet he will not fear he is being sent away again raising his anxiety level.

 

The more I learn the more I realize how little I know.
Are you setting an example or being an example?
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Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Separation anxiety

[ Edited ]

@Susan423

I taught my dogs a hand signal that shows them I'll be back.  It can take some time, but communication always helps.

 

I'd say "see you later" and wave my hand (you know, like the royal wave, from the elbow), and leave the room.  In the beginning, it was just for a moment, then come back in.  Gradually increase the time.  Eventually, he'll catch on.

 

Even if he (like some dogs do) goes deaf later on, you'll still have the hand signal to reassure him.

 

I forgot to add that once they figure it out, they kind of turn away and their tails drop because they don't like you to leave, but they resign themselves to it.  It's really wonderful to see that they do understand.

 

You can also add in the Kong treats or other things along with this.

Love to be home . . . thus the screen name. Joined 2003.
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Registered: ‎03-14-2010

@Homegirlwrote:

@Susan423

I taught my dogs a hand signal that shows them I'll be back.  It can take some time, but communication always helps.

 

I'd say "see you later" and wave my hand (you know, like the royal wave, from the elbow), and leave the room.  In the beginning, it was just for a moment, then come back in.  Gradually increase the time.  Eventually, he'll catch on.

 

Even if he (like some dogs do) goes deaf later on, you'll still have the hand signal to reassure him.

 

I forgot to add that once they figure it out, they kind of turn away and their tails drop because they don't like you to leave, but they resign themselves to it.  It's really wonderful to see that they do understand.

 

You can also add in the Kong treats or other things along with this.


@Homegirl

Good for you!  That really works for my Granddog, Jasper, too!  When getting out of the car to do errands, my son says, "I'll be right back!"  Jasper knows exactly what he means and gets that worried look right off his face!  I love the combo with the hand signals!  How smart!!!  good post.gif

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Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: Separation anxiety

[ Edited ]

I rescued a chi mix who had awful SA. I think it’s more common to this breed because they are VERY attached to people. Mine wants to be on a lap or in my arms 24/7- no exaggeration! 

When we first got her, we all had to be out of the house at work all day, so we had to bring her to doggie daycare.  But now my DH is home and It has gotten much better over the last 2 years, so be aware it may take time, because she’s/ he’s been abandoned so she’s insecure.

Try a gate , not a closed door so she isn’t so solitary, and away from the pack.  Try to speed up the intro to cats or keep cats in the room with closed door...

i tried the OTC calming meds and that didn’t work, and the crate did not help her feel secure at all either- She cried terribly in a crate.   Aafter some testing at the vet, they prescribed the lowest possible dose of Prozac for her ( mainly because she had a nervous peeing problem too, not the SA).   The prozac has helped calm her-  She’s off it now because time and very gentle training has helped all her problems. Over time, she trusted us and the environment. 

Give her a chance, It will get better, they are worth it, mine is the sweetest thing in my life! 

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Hi @fortune

That's so kind of you.  I'm glad the same idea has been working for your son and Jasper, too.   I always thought that dogs would appreciate a "heads up"! Woman Wink

Love to be home . . . thus the screen name. Joined 2003.