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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Not strange - just different

My 11 y.o. precious gal is behaving differently.  

 

Last June she had her first (with me) stroke and it took her a month to fully recover.   The vet said it zaps them of energy and the brain needs time to heal.  She couldn't navigate stairs. She stared at walls and was basically non-responsive.

 

Fast forward to the Saturday before Super Bowl Sunday.  We were out for her morning walk when she suddenly looked up and had that blank look in her eye.  It didn't hit me at first, so I said to her, "It's me, silly girl."  She collapsed when we went indoors and slept all day.  I knew something was up when the UPS guy came by and all she managed from beneath the dining room table were a couple of weak woofs.

 

This Monday, she had a mild episode.

 

All this to ask - could this explain her missing cues such as when I tell her it's time to eat?  She looks a little confused so I lead her to her bowl and mix the kibble a little so that she knows what to do.  She eats it with little enthusiasm.  She doesn't want to take walks anymore, so we're down to morning, noon and late evening.  Where as before, she couldn't wait to go out.

 

The vet says that there is nothing one can do to fix this problem.  

 

Anyone else experienced this or experiencing this now?

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,202
Registered: ‎09-24-2011

Re: Not strange - just different

I would get a second opinion.  People need rehab sometimes from strokes; sometimes, nothing can be done.  Who knows, she could have 'memory problems' due to some underlying problem.  Did your vet tell you what caused the stroke?

 

If you have a teaching hospital, contact them.  Any teaching hospital, be it for furybabies or people - are up on all the newest info, studies, equipment.  I not, get some recommendations from friends/family and then decide who to consult.  Most vets do not charge when they give a 'second opinion'.

 

Prayers and hugs for both of youHeart.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Not strange - just different

Thanks, goldenlocks, for your suggestion.  I actually thought of taking her to another very well-loved vet for his opinion.

 

I know that she would need an xray and then an MRI.  Hopefully, these would shed some light on her condition.

 

She's so sweet and I wonder if she's developing dementia.

 

Will post after I take her to the second opinion vet.

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,245
Registered: ‎04-16-2010

Re: Not strange - just different

Sending warm wishes to you. I know how hard it is to see our pets aging and having problems. One of my dogs is fourteen and showing his age mentally and physically. He is the sweetest, best fella. His three vets say he is a well-loved, happy guy. I'm sure your sweet girl is, too. Keep us posted about her.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 67,438
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Not strange - just different


@pommom wrote:

Thanks, goldenlocks, for your suggestion.  I actually thought of taking her to another very well-loved vet for his opinion.

 

I know that she would need an xray and then an MRI.  Hopefully, these would shed some light on her condition.

 

She's so sweet and I wonder if she's developing dementia.

 

Will post after I take her to the second opinion vet.


Dementia would be my first guess.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,245
Registered: ‎04-16-2010

Re: Not strange - just different

@pommom, any news about your sweet girl? I'm very interested in knowing how she is doing. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Update - Not strange - just different

Thanks for your concern Silver Lining.

 

The second opinion did not differ.  He took xrays and an MRI to see if there were any clogged/twisted arteries.  None. He confirmed that she has an irregular heartbeat which I've known all along.  I have to be careful not to exercise her to exhaustion.

 

Like me, he commented on her sweet personality and willingness to cooperate.  I think this comes from being in a puppy mill for 11 years - she did as she was led to do.

 

While we were there, she was alert, bright eyed, tail wagging.

 

He said that the dementia isn't that bad, but when it develops into a constant state, he has medicationn he can prescribe for her.  He reminded me it would keep the dementia from getting worse, but the time would come when the rx would not be effective.  In his words, "We would be putting off the inevitable." He was very gentle and kind and understood my sadness at seeing her go through this.

 

So, since I initially posted, she had only one instance wherein she started barking ferociously because she thought she had been trapped in the kitchen with the lights out.  She was going round in circles and couldn't see her way clear into the adjoining dining room.  I reached down and spoke softly to her as I led her out. Note that the dining room lights were on and she's gone back and forth a hundred times.  Sigh.....

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown