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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,715
Registered: ‎03-30-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

@Tshirtgal

 

Just call me dense, but I don't know what cat ***** is.  Seems quite magical, but can you be a bit more explicit?  The only thing I can come up with is cat food, but why the ****?

 

Thanks! 😁

 

Super Contributor
Posts: 402
Registered: ‎09-05-2013

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

I had the same issue with my kitty.  I recently replaced my recliner and was concerned she would use it as her new favorite scratching post.  I had tried a couple of types of posts with no luck.  This time I purchased a tall "tree" that is wrapped in carpeting.  She loves it and has not bothered the new recliner at all.  I had also used double faced clear tape on the edges of my dining room chairs and that also acted as a deterant for her.  

The trick seems to be finding something that she likes to scratch -- vertical/horizontal, hard surface or soft surface.  Someone on this board mentioned to notice the cat's preference, and  I found the poster's comments very helpful in choosing the right scratcher for her.  Good luck with your search.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,710
Registered: ‎07-20-2014

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

[ Edited ]

@this is my nic   I think she is referring to cat ****** n!p but it's one of those banned words.

 

ETA:  Catnip works but cat ****** as two words does not! Smiley Happy

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,918
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!


@this is my nic wrote:

@Tshirtgal

 

Just call me dense, but I don't know what cat ***** is.  Seems quite magical, but can you be a bit more explicit?  The only thing I can come up with is cat food, but why the ****?

 

Thanks! 😁

 


 

 

@this is my nic   When you type a word that the computer program deems inappropriate, it shows *'s instead of the word.  I think she meant catnip, but am not sure why that wouldn't have printed.

My little dog, a heartbeat at my feet. —Edith Wharton
What greater gift than the love of a cat.--Charles Dickens





Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,715
Registered: ‎03-30-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

@Caligurll 

 

LOL!  

 

Thank you!  I never would have thought that word would be a problem!  Catnip is ok. Cat n*p is not.  🤣🤣🤣

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,794
Registered: ‎09-12-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

@this is my nic, your Walter is such a big boy that it might take a couple layers of tape to discourage him! I thought my Sammie was big at 19 pounds, but Walter sounds like a gentle giant! I hope the packing tape suggestion works for you. Good luck to you (and Walter)!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,156
Registered: ‎07-09-2011

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

You might try two sided tape on his favorite spots.

 

Also keep sprayer filled with water nearby and spray him ‘in the act’

 

And GOOD LUCK!

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras
Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,918
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

@this is my nic   I just wanted to say please don't spray your cat with water.  I noticed it had been recommended twice and just had to jump in.  There are many articles from cat behaviorists explaining why this isn't a good idea.  This is an excerpt from one article that I found.

 

So what happens when you use a spray bottle, or other method of punishment that comes from you?

  • Your cat starts to associate the unpleasant experience with you, and not necessarily his actions with the punishment (as you intended).
  • Your cat will begin to do the undesired “thing” when you’re not around.
  • Your cat will begin to fear and distrust you.
  • Your cat’s stress levels may increase, which can result in more of the behavior you are trying to correct, or result in a new undesirable behavior.

I hope this is helpful.  My cat uses his scratching post all the time.  I have several around the house, but he likes his tall vertical sisal post the best.

My little dog, a heartbeat at my feet. —Edith Wharton
What greater gift than the love of a cat.--Charles Dickens





Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,652
Registered: ‎06-27-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

[ Edited ]

 

               @this is my nic,  Bless you for your obvious love for this dear kitty!❤️    I've been a feline fan and owned by precious cats my whole life, thought I knew a lot about them...  but since starting to watch cat behaviorist/cat whisperer Jackson Galaxy's shows, videos, and reading his articles I've learned so much more, so many practical, effective, useful insights.

            Sorry for the length of this excerpt, but I know some posters don't like to go to links.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

"How to Stop Cats Scratching Furniture"

 

Why Having Claws and Scratching is Important to Cats

Claws are a physically, socially, and emotionally vital part of every cat. Scratching, for a cat, is not only a natural act, but a necessary one as well.

It removes the dead outer sheaths of nail, keeping it sharp and ready for action.

It is an essential exercise technique which serves to stretch and strengthen their upper bodies.


Cats mark their territory visually, especially in multi–cat households, as a way of determining rank.

Between your cat’s toes are scent glands which leave her “signature” when she scratches.

You Should Never Declaw Your Cat!

Declawing is surgery where the claw and end bone of each toe are amputated; it is essentially the amputation of 1/3 of the cat’s paws.

 

Declawed cats must be kept indoors only, since the front claws are a cat’s primary means of self-defense and escape against the many dangers and predators in our area.

 

Declawed cats are often chronically painful, and may develop aggression or litter box problems.

We strongly discourage declawing or tendonectomy surgeries.
Paws and claws are integral tools for cats in no uncertain physical and behavioral terms.

 

We have seen many cats relinquished to shelters who were declawed and then developed new unwanted behaviors afterward, including urinating outside the litterbox (usually on carpets, bedding, and furniture), or increased aggression and biting...

 

...

How To Get Your Cat To Stop Scratching Unwanted Areas of Your Home

The "Yes" Technique            

Appropriate places for your cat to let out his scratching instincts are critical for long term behavioral success.

 

We recommend not only a scratching post, but several, depending on how many areas he likes to scratch on already.

 

For instance if he goes for both arms of the couch, then that’s where you will want your posts at the start.

Cat Furniture: Cat Condos, Scratchers, & Trees

Cat “condos” or “trees” are beneficial in many ways, one of which is to provide a common marking post in multi–cat households.

 

Before you invest a lot of money in buying or building a post, make sure you are catering to your feline friend’s particular preferences.

 

There are inexpensive horizontal cardboard scratchers for carpet–lovers, wedge shaped cardboard ramps for cats who scratch low on furniture, and upright posts or “trees” for cats who like that full–body hang–from–the–claws feeling.

 

The material that the post is made of is also important.

 

Many cats prefer the feel of a sisal rope–wound post, and natural wood is also desirable in that it closely mimics what they’d like to scratch most of all — a tree!

 

A redwood or cedar (softwood) plank or log may be a real hit.

 

Beware of carpet covered furniture, mainly because it’s hard to teach your cat that scratching “this” carpet is okay, but “that” carpet isn’t.

Once the new piece of cat furniture is in your home, rub it with catnip, or dangle your cat’s favorite toy from the top, creating a game which encourages your cat to mimic the motion of scratching.

 

Your lavish praise will also help create a positive association with the act of scratching the cat furniture.

Test Drive the new cat furniture.   

Remember that in order to fully exercise his upper extremities and get a good stretch, the cat must have enough confidence in the post to put all of his body weight into it.

 

If the post has too small or too insecure a base, it will wobble or tip as he pulls, eroding his confidence in the post and leading him back to that nice solid furniture.

The "No" Technique

The following methods will help break the cat of the habit of scratching inappropriate objects (your furniture) by removing the pleasurable component and replacing it with something not quite so nice.

These include things like:

-- tin foil covering the spot
-- double-sided tape like Sticky Paws
(which comes in different sizes and versions designed specifically for furniture or plants)
-- Purrfect Paw (non-sticky, clear plastic protectors)
-- vinyl carpet runner with the spike side up in front of the spot

But remember, aversive methods will only work when the cat is provided with an alternate surface that is equally or more desirable.

If you catch the cat in the act of scratching in the undesired spot, even with the aversives in place, correct the cat with a sound; hissing, a quick “ah!” but nothing that she can interpret as punishing sounds associated with your voice.

 

This is why we don’t use the cat’s name during the correction, but only when he performs an action we approve of.

 

His name is only used in conjunction with praise. Especially at first, it’s important to follow the correction with a trip to the post, where the cat has an opportunity to earn praise and again make positive connections with the experience of scratching in the right place.

 

After the correction, carrying the cat over to the right place shouldn’t have a punishing feel to it — don’t scoop the cat off the ground in a sudden motion, or continue after the correction sound with further disapproving tones.

If the cat is having a hard time accepting the post, try daily sessions where you make the sound with your fingers of scratching on the post, accompanied by praise, and an irresistible treat to reward the cat as soon as he performs the desired action.

 

Timing is important!   The positives need to be heaped on the cat while he performs the action; a nanosecond later and he’ll have no idea why you are praising him.   He’ll like it, but he won’t get the message.

Be patient; incorporating this new behavior into his routine may take a few months without having any “slips”."

 

(please copy and paste link for full article and for video:

 

video "How to Stop Your Cats From Scratching Furniture"

at

youtube.com/watch?v=-XZxyWEiQZM

 

article at

 jacksongalaxy.com/blog/how-to-stop-your-cats-from-scratching-furniture/)

 

 

⭐️"Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy.” ~H.W. Newton⭐️


Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,652
Registered: ‎06-27-2010

Re: HELP, Cat scratching new furniture!

 

            I posted this on another thread, but thought it might be helpful here, too.   Just a few suggestions so you can see how a gifted cat behaviorist gets into that complex and wonderful mind of the feline.😻   

 

(please copy and paste link URLs -- I'm not always sure which sites are within the Community standards hyperlinks)

 

 

 

 

"Best and Worst Ways to Train Your Cat

(Hint: NO squirt gun)" 

 

youtube.com/watch?v=WJcWoksdlOM

 

 

"How to Trim Your Cat's Nails"

 

 jacksongalaxy.com/blog/how-to-stop-your-cats-from-scratching-furniture/

 

 

"Cat Behavior Resources"

 

thejacksongalaxyproject.org/Resources/Cat-Behavior-Resources

 

 

⭐️"Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy.” ~H.W. Newton⭐️