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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,072
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I have to say that when I tried feed my dog V-Dog and Fromm, he started panting heavily and breathing heavily like every little exertion was suddenly overwhelming and it wasn't even hot out at the time.  I had food allergy testing done on his saliva, and then I was able to find out exactly which foods not to feed him.  Now, I cook for him and he eats human food - rice, salmon (or beef or tofu), and a veggie like broccoli, spinach, kale, or cauliflower.  Once I switched him over he began getting excited about eating again, his energy level greatly improved, and there is a spring in his stride once again.  Not bad for a 9 year old dog.  

 

When he was on kibble, he would let those dry nuggets sit in his dog bowl for up to 3 hours before eating it, as if in protest, as if to tell me, "I'll eat that when I'm good and hungry, only."  LOL.  Now he practically knocks me over running to his bowl.  It's a lot more work, but I think he will live longer because of this change in his diet.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,415
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

@Jersey Born wrote:

I have to say that when I tried feed my dog V-Dog and Fromm, he started panting heavily and breathing heavily like every little exertion was suddenly overwhelming and it wasn't even hot out at the time.  I had food allergy testing done on his saliva, and then I was able to find out exactly which foods not to feed him.  Now, I cook for him and he eats human food - rice, salmon (or beef or tofu), and a veggie like broccoli, spinach, kale, or cauliflower.  Once I switched him over he began getting excited about eating again, his energy level greatly improved, and there is a spring in his stride once again.  Not bad for a 9 year old dog.  

 

When he was on kibble, he would let those dry nuggets sit in his dog bowl for up to 3 hours before eating it, as if in protest, as if to tell me, "I'll eat that when I'm good and hungry, only."  LOL.  Now he practically knocks me over running to his bowl.  It's a lot more work, but I think he will live longer because of this change in his diet.


More of us should do what you're doing, @Jersey Born 

Kibble is never at the top of any list for feeding, no matter how premium it may be or what ingredients it has or doesn't have.

 

Does everyone know kibble only started becoming popular after WWII? It started before then, but the WWII limits on meat and other rationed products made kibble more available, especially after manufacturers began heavily advertising kibble, their new product.

 

Sales, money, advertising - same story we've heard before.

Nothing wrong with salespeople trying to sell, so it is still caveat emptor - buyer beware.

[was Homegirl] Love to be home . . . thus the screen name. Joined 2003.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,014
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Yes home made would be better, but if you feed kibble,you just can not pour it ih their bowl ,and that be it, dogs need fresh protein, and veggies will not hurt them,and some fruits,too many just feed kibble and think that is good ,it is not.

When you lose some one you L~O~V~E, that Memory of them, becomes a TREASURE.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,009
Registered: ‎10-03-2011

Good read on the Whole Dog Journal website from last August.

Whole Dog Journal - Don't Panic About the Grain-Free Thing

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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,136
Registered: ‎06-25-2018

i cook for mydogs.  i buy chicken quarters and then pressure cook them.  i add a bit to their food each day alon g with some dry prunina dog food.  then i also feed my dogs any leftovers such  rice, squash and all manner of fruits andveggies.  my rule is that if i won'teat it then neither should my dogs