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Registered: ‎02-05-2018

Re: Anti- frizz product? Natural curly hair product?

[ Edited ]

@Skyegirlwrote:

His products seem well loved and I would try it  but I notice he doesn’t seem to address frizz-prone, natural curly hair- All the models have blown-out and heavily styled hair, and my hair is wavy, curly, coarse, difficult.  The last thing I need is more volume, I am trying to get less volume!  Am I missing something?


 

HAHAHA! YES! I agree and have similar issues.

My first piece of advice is visit the NaturallyCurly.com forums. I've learned about many good products and techniques from the people there.

 

Here are some of the things I've found most helpful in managing my own wavy-curly frizz, which is always much worse in humidity:

 

1) I use an old t-shirt to blot hair dry ut of the shower instead of a towel. Most towels are made with loops and they catch the hair cuticle and start to cause frizz before I even style my hair. You can also use a flour-sack kitchen cloth or a good microfiber towel. Some microfiber towels are like velcro and make frizz worse, so look for one that's made specifically for curly hair.

2) I buy styling products with ingredients like PVP (Polyvinylpyrrolidone) copolymer or Polyquaterniums (Polyquaternium-7, 10, 11, 37, etc). These are water-soluable non-silicones that help with hold and really work to help prevent frizz. Some of my favorite products with these ingredients include Climate Control Gel, by Ouidad, and Curl Keeper, by Curly Hair Solutions.

 

3) If you have hair that gets frizzier in humidity, then you should also look for products that contain no/ low glycerin or other humectents (honey, agave, etc.) There are loads of articles you can search on this, but it breaks down to this: humectants pull moisture ouf of the environment and into your hair. (They do the opposite in very dry weather, so also avoid them if you'r'e getting a lot of static issues.) In high humidity, that means the humectants pull a lot of moisture into the hair, causing the shaft to expand and the cuticle to rough up, which equals frizz.

 

Hope that helps. I can't say enough about how much I've learned from naturallycurly.com.