Reply
Honored Contributor
Posts: 26,769
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

The Williams-Sonoma cookbooks are very good, some of America's Test Kitchen, Mark Bittman, some of Giada's.

 

And of course Julia Child, Jacques Pepin and Emeril are my go-to sources for so many recipes. Beth Hensperger's bread books, the Joy of Cooking (older editions), Edna Lewis, Marcella Hazan, Lidia Bastianich, Joyce Chen and Martin Yan.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 35,878
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

My go to is the first cook book I ever bought, Betty Crocker, 1970.

 

I also have my grandmother's 1950 Betty Crocker cook book.

 

The rest of my collection is Best Recipies of Home Economics Teachers, church cook books, and Chelsea's Tea Room which has an amazing pasta salad with dill, ranch, and lemon!

 

In Chelsea's Kitchen Cookbook - Chelsea's and The Village Tea Room ...

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,800
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I probably have a gazillion cookbooks but my favorites are the Southern Living books. I've probably made more dishes out of those than any other books. 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,791
Registered: ‎04-02-2015

@qualitygal wrote:

Do you have a favorite?

 

Martha Stewart popped up on my looking around, got to wondering if anyone has any of her books and is/was it a help to you?


I have a lot of cookbooks,but rarely use them anymore. I go to google, put what I want in, and it's there, print it off and I'm not searching then. I donate to a church flea sale , and they tell me they can't even give them away, no one wants them, I have a feeling most are doing what I do.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,664
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

I love to “look” at cookbooks, and prefer OLD cookbooks; church ladies and women’s club, etc., are my favorites.  My very favorite is a local church cookbook that has a recipe submitted by my great grandmother.   

 

As much as I enjoy owning old cookbooks, I rarely ever cook from any of them!   I use them for ideas, but because of food allergies, I pretty much eat the same things the same way.  I do not have curious taste buds.   

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,088
Registered: ‎07-20-2017

I love cookbooks and read them like novels. My absolute favorites are the Gooseberry Cookbooks. The recipes are simple and absolutely delicious.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,458
Registered: ‎06-10-2015

Spoiler
 
@ECBG wrote:

My go to is the first cook book I ever bought, Betty Crocker, 1970.

 

I also have my grandmother's 1950 Betty Crocker cook book.

 

The rest of my collection is Best Recipies of Home Economics Teachers, church cook books, and Chelsea's Tea Room which has an amazing pasta salad with dill, ranch, and lemon!

 

In Chelsea's Kitchen Cookbook - Chelsea's and The Village Tea Room ...

 

 


I have the Chelsea's Kitchen cookbook as well, but have yet to make any dishes. I must do that pasta salad.

 

I have over 2,000 cookbooks, but if I had to whittle my shelves to a half dozen, I'd pick the big one from America's Test Kitchen because it discusses the experimentation that led to the recipe and why it works.

 

I'd take "No Crumbs Left" because it has some recipes I've been looking for for years.

 

I'd take the Betty Crocker cookbook my mother used because it has some recipes that are childhood favorites, plus Joy, because it has info and variations on everything.

 

"The Food Lab," by Kenji López-Alt, because it's such a rich read and has some amazing recipes.

 

I'd hate to say goodbye to the others, but those are what I'd take.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 564
Registered: ‎06-27-2017

Ina Garten is my go to for simple, flavorful recipes. I also have the America's Test Kitchen cook book on grilling which is a great resource that I use all of the time. As far as baking goes, there is only Rose Levy Berenbaum. 

 

My go-to resource for recipe these days have been NY Times Cooking. 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 26,769
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@ECBG wrote:

My go to is the first cook book I ever bought, Betty Crocker, 1970.

 

I also have my grandmother's 1950 Betty Crocker cook book.

 

The rest of my collection is Best Recipies of Home Economics Teachers, church cook books, and Chelsea's Tea Room which has an amazing pasta salad with dill, ranch, and lemon!

 

In Chelsea's Kitchen Cookbook - Chelsea's and The Village Tea Room ...

 

 


@ECBG Oh boy that sounds good.  Would you mind posting?  I LOVE lemon and dill, and ranch can't be bad!  LOL!!!  We make a lot of pasta salads especially in summer and then throw in some canned salmon or tuna for lunch.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 564
Registered: ‎06-27-2017

@Sooner wrote:

The Williams-Sonoma cookbooks are very good, some of America's Test Kitchen, Mark Bittman, some of Giada's.

 

And of course Julia Child, Jacques Pepin and Emeril are my go-to sources for so many recipes. Beth Hensperger's bread books, the Joy of Cooking (older editions), Edna Lewis, Marcella Hazan, Lidia Bastianich, Joyce Chen and Martin Yan.  


@Sooner What's your recommendation for a cook book on fresh pasta?