Reply
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,192
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

@doxie1 I originally asked the question because the lid on the milk said to shake well. No other pasturized milk I have had has included that on their containers.

 

I ended up e-mailing customer service and received this response:

"We included “shake well” on the bottle because when milk is pasteurized using UHT pasteurization the structural stability of the milk is slightly compromised. This causes milk proteins and vitamins to partially fall out of solution when sitting for extended periods of time. We implemented “shake well” to essentially mix everything back into solution."

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,479
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Icegoddess 

 

That is interesting!. Thanks for sharing.

 

Heat does  affect the vitamins and protein in milk. We generally go for with pasteurized for safety reasons and their only being a small reduction.

 

Ultra high heat pasteurization does change the shape of the proteins to elongate them so they are not as usable to humans. It may say the protein is one level but your body can not utilize what is there because of the shape change. This is not going to change the taste for most people. It is not going to change how long the milk lasts once it is opened.

 

Milk in general in the summer months has a hard time getting to the store without getting hotter than 36 degrees due to the heat and transfer of the product. You should notice your milk does not sour as fast in the cooler months.

 

 

If you buy that milk and like it then I would continue. I can see shaking milk to add air to it to make it more frothy.  I am sharing general milk facts with you. I am not telling you that the product is not good.

 

Have you ever toured a dairy? It is amazing to see how fast they have to cool the milk once it leaves the cow.

 

doxie

Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,480
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

My comment is about milk but not shaking it.

 

So, I recently saw something on TV where dairy farmers are going out of business because people are drinking less of what we call milk.

 

They were complaining, (and I agree) that a lot of what is touted as milk isn't milk and it's actually 'false' advertising.

 

My comment was, "So what!  These days people say anything they want to and no one corrects them or sets the record straight".

 

One mentioned is Almond milk.  It's actually NOT Milk.  There were lots of others.  

 

Someone commented, "People know they're not drinking milk".  The farmer replied, "You're totally missing what I'm trying to say.  They shouldn't be allowed to call it 'milk'"

 

I agree.

 

I like real milk.  I often drink a glass at night with a few cookies.

 

My late husband had to have a glass of milk and a peanut/banana  sandwich the minute he got home from one of his business trips.  He'd call me and say, "I'm turning onto our road.  Is the glass in the freezer?  Get ready to pour it".  Ha!

 

He liked really cold milk.  I'd put the glass in the freezer BEFORE I poured the whole milk.

 

He never drank soda or juice but boy did he love his milk.

 

I remember when I was a kid I had to go ever summer down to my relatives houses in the country. OMG!  They had 'out-houses/no toilets'.  They had hens and cows, etc.

 

I remember tasting real milk from the cow.  I thought it was terrible (it wasn't pasteurized, etc).  But I also remember skimming off the cream and churning the cream to make butter.

 

The water came from a well.  It was the best tasting water I've ever tasted.

 

Sorry, I'm totally off track...what else is new?  I'm sure there are others here that have similar memories of real milk and how these things used to be.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 35,418
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

i buy quite a bit of milk because my son drinks a lot of it and i use it to make yogurt. i usually buy the MAOLA brand of milk or sometimes our local farm brands if it is available. it is ultra pasteurized so it does last a while.

 

i usually shake the milk, the half n half, and the heavy cream. a habit i guess.

**********************************************
"I would prefer even to to fail with honor than win by cheating." - Sophocles
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,192
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Re: Why Shake the Milk?

[ Edited ]

@doxie1, I didn't think you were putting the milk down.  If it lasts longer than the other milk or if I can get later expiration dates I'm okay with paying a bit more for it.  I'm not overly concerned about the nutritional value.

 

I agree that it's easier to keep in winter than summer.  I have noticed that.  I am trying to take an insulated tote with me in the store for all or most of my cold goods even though I only live like 5 to 10 minutes from the store.  I have to get my husband Skinny Cows every week too and in this heat, any help is appreciated to keep things cold.

 

I have never been to a dairy, not even sure where one would be close by to tour, but I did used to buy fresh eggs from a nearbyfarm.  A girl at the skating rink would bring them to me.  Any she sold she got to keep the money.  But, about the dairy tour, you might like my comments below about my grandfather.

 

@Annabellethecat, my great great (or was it just great? Can't remember for sure) grandfather and another man were credited with starting the first dairy farm in the county they lived in.  My grandfather kept cows and sold his milk to the dairy.  He milked twice a day.  I remember him rolling the can out to the street for them to pick up, but I didn't think it was an every day thing.  For sure it wasn't twice a day.  I was only there like one week a year though.  I remember the cream being on top of the milk and having to stir it and it was thicker and sweeter than what we can get these days.  My grandmother made butter too.  So much more flavorful than the stuff in the stores.  Maybe the European butter with the higher fat would taste more like the real thing.  I guess all that processing may affect the flavor profile.

 

Oh, and I meant to add, I thought there had been a law passed that all these nut milks could no longer call themselves milk even though I'm sure everybody knows it's not milk.  I think I have started seeing different names on the store shelves although everybody still refer to them as milks.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,479
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Icegoddess 

 

Thank you. I did not want to sound like a know it all!

 

Milk comes out of the cow around 101 degrees and they have to cool it to 40 in minutes. The milk travels through tubes that are cooled with ice water and into a tank with an ice water sleeve.It amazes me that the milk comes out at that temperature and in 3 minutes it will be 39 degrees. If only my air conditioning worked that well!

 

They have new inventions now so it may be even faster.

 

 

Do you realize that most children today have no idea about cream forming on milk. I told some about the buttermilk shakes and they thought that was disgusting. They did crack me up with being shocked they were drinking something that came from a cow.

 

I think the processing does have an effect on the milk but the bigger thing is that cows are bred for milk production in quantity instead of quality. Now we have fewer cows producing more milk. Jersey milk and Guernsey are more like the milk of times gone by. The milk is directly related to what they eat so if we feed them a bland diet the milk will be bland.

 

 

 

Here is a story for you.

 

Belle was a beautiful guernsey cow with chocolate eyes and Looonnngggg eyelashes. She was a wild child and did her own thing. She learned how to open gates and take field trips. We got the call telling us that there was a cow in someone's yard. It would be Belle. She had a fondness for clover and wild onions. The clover made her milk sweeter. The onions made her milk smell like feet in a boy's locker room. Every time she got into onions we had to milk her by hand to keep the milk clean. One day she came prancing up to the barn with onions hanging out of her mouth and stuck in her feet. I was convinced she liked the attention of being milked by hand because she got to eat more food. She had a lot of personality. 

 

 

doxie

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,192
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

@doxie1 my father used to mix cornbread in his buttermilk and even got my daughter to doing it.  I still shake buttermilk any time I use it.  It does settle.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,480
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

@goldensrbest @Icegoddess  I enjoyed everyone’s posts.

 

As far as shaking and the air bubbles....I like them too☺️😋