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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,147
Registered: ‎02-14-2017

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !

Throwing it in the trash is cutting off your nose to spite your face. Seems like a silly reaction.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,821
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !


@Kachina624 wrote:

Throwing out a brand-new, clean, canned product sounds like cutting off your nose to spite your face.  Hope it made you feel better.


@Kachina624 I have done the same thing, although I am careful about where I buy from.

 

It seems any chance to sneer at anything from USA is a feel better past time here too.  But I don't feel bad at all about making choices of what I buy to eat.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 61,561
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !

@Sooner   I'd say just the opposite is true.  Any chance to sneer at products made outside of the US is open season.  You all go ahead and toss your imported foods, although they all must pass the same USDA standards.  It amuses me.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,733
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !


@kivah wrote:

@Reever wrote:

@minimalistWF wrote:

Your comment on here really shows your level of ignorance and discriminatory bias that you have for the world.  Just because something is imported from another country, such as Chile, does not mean that it is dirty or bad.  Believe it or not, certain ingredients and production happens in other countries where things are sourced.  You clearly have a very narrow and uneducated view of the world.  Not everything can be produced in our country, there are so many aspects that contribute to that and it is not as cut and dry as "keep jobs in the US".  

 

Indonesia is not a "dirty" country at all ... have you ever been to Bali or Jakarata?  Obviously not, but they are wonderful places.

 

 


Just  a proud American who loves the USA. I have no desire to visit far off lands when I live in a great land such as ours. It saddens me to see us outsource American talent to foreign nations.


America usually has higher standards for food and many other products. Most of the world is DIRTY!!! Outdoor markets with live animals; food being sold in unsanitary conditions (not wrapped or refrigerated.) Many products from overseas is also TOXIC!!! 


Just curious, @kivah.  Have you been to most of the world?

 

 


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,789
Registered: ‎05-11-2013

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !

I can honestly say I have never looked at the country of origin at the grocery store and I've lived nearly 70 yrs.   Not dead yet.

 

As for safety of food from China, the population is 1.2 BILLION people and they eat the food daily.

 

How many meat and salad recalls have we had in the states?  Too many to court over the years.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,757
Registered: ‎05-01-2010

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !


@Kachina624 wrote:

@Sooner   I'd say just the opposite is true.  Any chance to sneer at products made outside of the US is open season.  You all go ahead and toss your imported foods, although they all must pass the same USDA standards.  It amuses me.


@Kachina624  I agree with you all the way. I don't see where anyone 'sneers against the US' Anyone who thinks everything not made in the US is dirty is ignorant. I wish other posters wouldn't put words in other people's mouths. 

Super Contributor
Posts: 315
Registered: ‎06-01-2015

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !

Imagine most countries don't refrigerate their eggs in supermarkets? It has nothing to do with the level of cleanliness. Education is key. Seeing other parts of the world helps, sadly some consider 'drive thru' travel... 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,733
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !


@IntoSkincare wrote:

Imagine most countries don't refrigerate their eggs in supermarkets? It has nothing to do with the level of cleanliness. Education is key. Seeing other parts of the world helps, sadly some consider 'drive thru' travel... 


@IntoSkincare 

 

When Americans travel abroad and visit a market or grocery store, some may encounter eggs for sales nowhere near a refrigerator.   The Egg Safety Center has many readers who often ask a similar question: why is it safe to eat room temperature eggs in some parts of the world, but not in the USA?  The answer has to do with bacteria:  Salmonella.

 

In the United States, it’s more than a food safety recommendation that eggs be refrigerated – it’s the law. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) determined that the best way to fight Salmonella contamination is by sanitizing the eggs before they reach the consumer. The washing process removes contaminants, but it also removes the natural coating of the egg, leaving the shell porous.   On U.S. commercial egg farms, it is required that eggs are thoroughly washed and immediately refrigerated before they leave the farm and during transportation to the grocery store.

 

In other parts of the world, such as Europe, authorities approach the t

e threat of Salmonella quite differently. Eggs there are not required to go through extensive washing, which leaves the protective coating on the egg. Because this coating remains on the eggs, authorities feel it is safe for them to be sold at room temperature. In some European countries, vaccines are used to prevent Salmonella in laying hens.

 

In America, food safety officials emphasize that once eggs have been refrigerated, it is critical they remain that way. A cool egg at room temperature can sweat, facilitating the growth of bacteria that could enter the egg through its porous shell.

 

Marianne Gravely, who has been answering consumer food safety questions at the USDA for 27 years explains: “Eggs shouldn’t be left at room temperature for more than two hours. There is no way to know if a shell egg is pathogen-free. Food poisoning bacteria don’t affect the taste, smell, or appearance of a food. You can’t tell if a chicken is infected with Salmonella, so any egg, whether it came from a grocery store, a farmers’ market, or from your neighbor’s backyard hens, could contain Salmonella.”

 

Refrigeration also preserves egg quality. Learn more about the correlation between refrigeration and egg quality from a study by USDA Agricultural Research Service.

 

 source: egg safety center


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Super Contributor
Posts: 315
Registered: ‎06-01-2015

Re: Supermarket delivered condensed milk from CHILE !


@suzyQ3 wrote:

@IntoSkincare wrote:

Imagine most countries don't refrigerate their eggs in supermarkets? It has nothing to do with the level of cleanliness. Education is key. Seeing other parts of the world helps, sadly some consider 'drive thru' travel... 


@IntoSkincare 

 

When Americans travel abroad and visit a market or grocery store, some may encounter eggs for sales nowhere near a refrigerator.   The Egg Safety Center has many readers who often ask a similar question: why is it safe to eat room temperature eggs in some parts of the world, but not in the USA?  The answer has to do with bacteria:  Salmonella.

 

In the United States, it’s more than a food safety recommendation that eggs be refrigerated – it’s the law. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) determined that the best way to fight Salmonella contamination is by sanitizing the eggs before they reach the consumer. The washing process removes contaminants, but it also removes the natural coating of the egg, leaving the shell porous.   On U.S. commercial egg farms, it is required that eggs are thoroughly washed and immediately refrigerated before they leave the farm and during transportation to the grocery store.

 

In other parts of the world, such as Europe, authorities approach the t

e threat of Salmonella quite differently. Eggs there are not required to go through extensive washing, which leaves the protective coating on the egg. Because this coating remains on the eggs, authorities feel it is safe for them to be sold at room temperature. In some European countries, vaccines are used to prevent Salmonella in laying hens.

 

In America, food safety officials emphasize that once eggs have been refrigerated, it is critical they remain that way. A cool egg at room temperature can sweat, facilitating the growth of bacteria that could enter the egg through its porous shell.

 

Marianne Gravely, who has been answering consumer food safety questions at the USDA for 27 years explains: “Eggs shouldn’t be left at room temperature for more than two hours. There is no way to know if a shell egg is pathogen-free. Food poisoning bacteria don’t affect the taste, smell, or appearance of a food. You can’t tell if a chicken is infected with Salmonella, so any egg, whether it came from a grocery store, a farmers’ market, or from your neighbor’s backyard hens, could contain Salmonella.”

 

Refrigeration also preserves egg quality. Learn more about the correlation between refrigeration and egg quality from a study by USDA Agricultural Research Service.

 

 source: egg safety center


I grew up in Europe and continue to travel where I buy eggs on a shelf of the supermarket, including in Costa Rica where stores have no windows and no A/C. This country's food industry is so corrupt, we should ponder the fact the OP may not be well enough to go to the store because she eats stuff like A CAN OF SUGAR.