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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,426
Registered: ‎05-14-2011

I'm not sure I should post this here or in Recipes but here goes!

 

I've been making the internet famous 'no-knead bread' since early spring.  I've used volume measures and also weighed ingredients - there's only 4 - but still  the interior seemsa bit too moist after baking.  I've tried baking it longer, I've tried reducing the amount of water, increasing the salt a touch, but nothing seems to work.

 

Any idea what I'm doing wrong or could do differently?  I even asked King Arthur website - didn't get a very satisfactory answer.  (I was frankly surprised).

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,219
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

These are the proportions when I bake this bread in my Dutch oven:

 

17 oz flour

1/4 tsp instant yeast

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups room-temperature water

 

I shape the dough on a piece of greased parchment.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,223
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: No knead bread

[ Edited ]

@Sammijo Are you using  'bread flour' and not all purpose flour?  Bread flour has a higher protein count and will rise better and should not yield a dense/wet bread.  One other thing with bread flour, you should always spoon it into the measuring cup and not just scoop the flour out.  Spooning it into the measuring cup aerates the flour.  

 

I've taken to No Knead breads since the pandemic and have experienced some bread recipes are just denser than others, and also the proofing time differs with some as well.  Some No Knead bread are ready to bake the same day within 3 or 4 hours, while others you need to let rise 12-18 hours, generally overnight.  

 

Another thing is the yeast.  Active dry yeast is usually used with a long rise time while instant or fast yeast yields a faster rise bread.  You might try using a different brand of yeast.  Does you bread rise sufficiently?  It needs to double in size and get sort of bubbles in the dough.  This is what makes the bread light and airy, not dense.  I have a food thermometer that I faithfully use to test the temperature of the water I use, as using too warm or too cool with definitely make a difference in the yeast's rise in your dough.  You could also kill the yeast if the water is not the correct temperature. 

 

 

Try switching to a new No Knead bread recipe.  There are tons on the internet to chose from.  Some yield better results than others. 

 

I always use a covered cast iron Dutch Oven to bake my bread in and the oven must be preheated on 450 degrees F for 30 minutes prior to the bread being baked.  

 

Cinderella is proof that a new pair of shoes can change your life!
Honored Contributor
Posts: 29,602
Registered: ‎08-19-2010

Re: No knead bread

[ Edited ]

high humidity

 

don't understand that one post about 1/4 teaspoon yeast ! Yikes !

 

 

maybe that 's one of those gluten free recipes ?

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,386
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I made it once.  The crust was way too crusty, almost tooth shattering.

Cross that off my bucket list.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,426
Registered: ‎05-14-2011

Re: No knead bread

[ Edited ]

@deepwaterdotter , the recipe I've been using dictates 15 oz of flour.  I'll try two more oz and see i that helps.

 

@ciaobella , I've been using AP flour as that's what the recipes I've seen have listed. The dough has lot of bubbles as it rises and easily doubles. The bread isn't dense, it is light and airy, but it just feels a bit moist in the center. I've been using regular yeast (not fast acting) and letting it rise usually more than 18 hours. I've been mixing up the dough around noon and start the baking process around 9 AM the next day. (around 21 hours). Could that be it? Maybe there's not enough little yeasties left to fully help the water evaporate/steam during the baking process. Next time I'll adjust the time to start the process within the 18 hours.