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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,331
Registered: ‎07-09-2011

Having had them in England, I think they are prounced to rhyme

 

with  Nasty - the A is a Long Hard one.

 

🙂

 

Bet @dulwich eats them while wearing her special tiara!

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras
Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,321
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

This was a strong tradition in my family. We has "pasty" at least once a week when I was growing up. My mom said it came from our English roots. She was 100% English on both sides- her grandfather came directly from England as an adult.

 

 

Anyway my family's version was like a regular pie, using ground beef, potatoes, and onions, layered with butter. I loved it!

 

So it was one of the first things I made after I was on my own. DH is not a fan. I tried later on with my children. They are not fans either. I stopped making them.

 

 

Both of my mom's brothers were young widowers (one remarried). My one uncle called one day and said he'd found a frozen version that "came close" to what we were used to. Unfortunately we couldn't get it where we lived.

 

 

 

 I have some of my mom's favorite recipes, and there are some I took for granted and watched her make that she never wrote down. She typed this on an index card for me, and I'm glad she did!  Smiley Happy

 

 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

We bought them when I was a kid.They had stands in Michigan on the UP. I've made them. They often have rutabags in them. They were tradtionally made for miners.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,319
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@CrazyKittyLvr2 wrote:

Ok, I'm confused.  I Googled the word pastie before I posted and saw pictures of what I had for dinner and lunch.I wanted the correct spelling.

 

I didn't want it confused with stripper gear.

 

Now I see pasty.

 

Which is it?


I've seen them spelled both ways up here.

 

I had an elderly neighbor who was Finnish and she would ask me to bring her back a few when I traveled. It's true that many versions contain rutabeggas but they vary tremendously.

 

The UP is heavily Finnish and those hardy souls that worked in the copper mines from Copper Harbor south would carry them in their lunch buckets. 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,184
Registered: ‎05-30-2012

@KingstonsMomIG wrote:

LOL! Oh lord help me!

 

When I read this thread title I immediatedly thought it was about 'pasties' that strippers wear!!

 

I'm really losing it!

 

837514213.gif



@KingstonsMomIG wrote:

LOL! Oh lord help me!

 

When I read this thread title I immediatedly thought it was about 'pasties' that strippers wear!!

 

I'm really losing it!

 

837514213.gif


You are not alone !!!!

Regular Contributor
Posts: 232
Registered: ‎08-01-2010

@Just Bling wrote:

This post is no different than the "Hummer" one....I thought someone was thinking about buying the new $100,000 Hummer vehicle.

 

So what makes this post funnier is you have a "Retired" OP'r and she finally  got her 1st pastie.   So what took you so long?

 

 

 

These are not easy to make, the dough needs TLC to keep it tender, the filling takes time to put together and by the time you are done and how many it makes, you are better off finding out who made those and order more.   You can also find them in the freezer section in the grocery store but you will be disappointed with the mass produced product.


Agreed but if you're anywhere near a Scottish grocer you might find home made ones there.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,584
Registered: ‎05-11-2013

@Melzie   It took me so long because I live in a one horse town in the country. lol

 

Scottish grocer?  I am 20 miles round trip from a basic Weis or Walmart.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,584
Registered: ‎05-11-2013
 
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,584
Registered: ‎05-11-2013

Oops, wrong person.  I was trying to read around my cat on the laptop.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,993
Registered: ‎09-27-2010

I had a British friend who made these and she corrected my pronunciation (because mine inferred the "other" kind). She said it's pronounced pass-tee.