Reply
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I don't know what I did wrong, but my cherry pie turned out to be a dud.

I used canned cherries (drained), Pillsbury pie crusts (room temp) and a Pyrex pie plate.

I suspect that the pie plate was too large measuring 9 1/2" because the bottom crust didn't come to the edge so when I placed the top crust on top there was no crust to pinch together. The results were cherry juice running between the bottom crust and the Pyrex plate.

Another issue was that the pie was runny when I cut into it.

So, how does one bake a good cherry pie? Are there 10" crusts?

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Anyone??? I know you master bakers are out there!

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,229
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Pommom--I think that the refrigerated pie crusts are for a 9" pie pan with a standard depth. There are also 9", deep dish pie pans which would naturally take a larger pie crust for the bottom. Sometimes, if the pie pan is a little bigger, you can roll them out a bit to make them bigger.

I am not sure what you added to your cherries for the filling but I know that I have to add cornstarch to make the juice thicker. Some bakers use flour. The amount that you would use would depend on the amount of cherries and how juicy they are so I am not sure what to tell you as far as how much.

Were the canned cherries sweetened? You would have to add sugar if they weren't and that would thicken them up a little bit, too.

I don't know what others do but I have been baking pies for about 50 years. I have learned that when I use fresh fruit, to heat up the fruit after I add the spices and sugar so that I can see how much juice I have. Then, I add cornstarch accordingly and put the fruit mixture in the dough lined pie pan. It has worked for me and I am sure that other bakers do other things that work for them. I hope that is helpful.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,792
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Use a smaller pie pan or try rolling out the pie crust slightly with a rolling pin to make it a bit larger. To prevent a runny pie some recipes call for sprinkling a little flour or fine tapioca on the filling before putting on the top crust. Google and you will probably find more ideas.

It's a shame your pie didn't turn out well. Have you tried making your own crusts? They do take some practice but once you get the knack you can throw together a pie any time you want without having to buy premade crusts at the store.

Super Contributor
Posts: 940
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Did you use canned cherries instead of cherry pie filling. The filling would have thickener and sugar already added to the consistency you needed.

Cherries in their own juice would be a lot thinner consistency?

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,752
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Looks like the other gals have talked with you about crust. Here is the filling.

1 1/3 cups sugar

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

6 cups sour cherries, pitted

2 tablespoons butter or margarine

In large bowl, mix sugar and 1/2 cup flour. Stir in cherries. Spoon into pastry-lined pie plate. Cut butter into small pieces; sprinkle over cherries. Cover with top pastry that has slits cut in it; seal and flute. Cover edge with 2- to 3-inch strip of foil to prevent excessive browning; remove foil during last 15 minutes of baking.

There are two types of cherries—sweet and sour. Sour cherries, also called pie cherries, tart cherries or tart red cherries make wonderful pies. Sweet cherries are great for eating fresh, but not for pies.

Substitute 6 cups frozen unsweetened pitted red tart cherries, thawed and drained, or 3 cans (14.5 oz each) pitted red tart cherries, drained, for the fresh cherries.

It's God's job to judge the terrorists. It's our mission to arrange the meeting. U.S. Marines
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I prefer to use a pie tin (pan) versus a "dish." Also, next time try purchasing a can or two of pie "filling," instead of just cherries. The filling is very like which you'll find in many commercially produced cherry pies. Good luck!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,512
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
All of these suggestions are wonderful-but don't throw out your baby with the bath water! Turn it into a lovely dessert by mixing it in with ice cream, or throwing It into a milk shake ( these ideas are courtesy of "The Today Show"..)..make a parfait.....all is not lost! Poodlepet2
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,223
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Thank you, thank you, thank you Master Bakers! I will take your sage advice and experience on my next try.

I turned the pie into a cobbler and added whip cream. Still, it needed all of the above ingredients to make it a delicious treat.

Bless you all! {#emotions_dlg.biggrin}

If your face brightens when you meet a friend, you have struck gold. - unknown
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎09-14-2011

A better thickener for fruit pies is tapioca starch. It gels like cornstarch but will not turn cloudy. You can use Minute Tapioca, available at any grocery store, the directions are on the box. Or. you can buy powdered tapioca starch at Asian markets.

My other suggestion is to make your own pie dough from scratch, with butter. If you're going to the trouble to make a pie, why not make it the best it can be? Commercial pie dough is made with shortening - poor flavor and unhealthy trans fats.