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Valued Contributor
Posts: 542
Registered: ‎05-20-2015

Re: Pink Morganite


@beansie wrote:
Wish someone would actually buy a piece of LR jewelry and not just keep posting. Would love to have see reviews on her pieces.

 

I'd like to see reviews by actual purchasers too @beansie. Would be interesting to know quantities sold also because "sold out" means zip if we don't know how many were available. So far the offerings look like a random grab bag from other vendors discontinued merchandise and jewelry trade shows. I liked LR on the Q ..... she was excellent ......... but the jury's still out (for me) about what she's doing now.

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,635
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Pink Morganite

Washed out color on those  stones spells INFERIOR. In that picture Lisa looks like she is smelling her fingers...yuk!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: Pink Morganite


@Juniebugz wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@sunchild wrote:
I have seen some gorgeous morganite pieces in my travels and this does not compare! Perhaps you can do some comparison shopping before you purchase. What she is offering is inferior in quality. The stones in her piece are enhanced by the rose gold PLATING. Quality morganite should stand on it's own in color.

Not sure how you can determine this w/o having first seen it.  All of the stones goes through some type of "treatment" whether it's set in rose gold or white gold.  In addition most folk know that color saturation is dependent also on the size of the stone.  Larger stones will have better color.


 

Some stones are treated. Not all stones. Also color saturation can be just as good in a small stone of good quality. And it's well known the rose gold is often used to play up the pink in a stone. Good morganite is very expensive and if I recollect correctly shouldn't have gray color. I think @sunchild is correct that stones are better seen in person but of course it's normal to buy online in today's world.

 


Most Morganite stones are irradiated.  If she had untreated stones here, there is no way in the world she could only charge $399.99 for the bracelet.  Not at such a low price point.  Color, Carat weight applies to color gemstones just like it does diamonds.

 

Of course, it's ideal to see it in person.  I don't find a lot brick and mortar stores that you can walk into and get exotic gemstones though.  I live in area of the country where jewelry is big business and has its own district.

 

Larger stones have better color saturation (just like with many other stones).

 

http://www.gia.edu/morganite-quality-factors

 

 

Color
Morganite’s color range includes pink, rose, peach, and salmon. In today’s market, the pink and rose tints are more fashionable. The peach and salmon hues seem less popular, but some collectors value untreated peach-colored material more highly than heat-treated pink stones.

The gem is almost always heat-treated to improve the pink color. The treatment is not detectable. Heat drives off the yellow or orange tinge, leaving a purer and more attractive pink. The resulting color is stable and won’t fade.

 

Cut
Because morganite has distinct pleochroism—pale pink and a deeper bluish pink—it’s necessary to orient the rough carefully for fashioning. Strong hues in morganite are rare, and gems usually have to be fairly large to achieve the finest color. Morganite is cut in all standard shapes and sizes as well as in unique designer cuts.

*Call Tyrone*
Valued Contributor
Posts: 542
Registered: ‎05-20-2015

Re: Pink Morganite

[ Edited ]

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Juniebugz wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@sunchild wrote:
I have seen some gorgeous morganite pieces in my travels and this does not compare! Perhaps you can do some comparison shopping before you purchase. What she is offering is inferior in quality. The stones in her piece are enhanced by the rose gold PLATING. Quality morganite should stand on it's own in color.

Not sure how you can determine this w/o having first seen it.  All of the stones goes through some type of "treatment" whether it's set in rose gold or white gold.  In addition most folk know that color saturation is dependent also on the size of the stone.  Larger stones will have better color.


 

Some stones are treated. Not all stones. Also color saturation can be just as good in a small stone of good quality. And it's well known the rose gold is often used to play up the pink in a stone. Good morganite is very expensive and if I recollect correctly shouldn't have gray color. I think @sunchild is correct that stones are better seen in person but of course it's normal to buy online in today's world.

 


Most Morganite stones are irradiated.  If she had untreated stones here, there is no way in the world she could only charge $399.99 for the bracelet.  Not at such a low price point.  Color, Carat weight applies to color gemstones just like it does diamonds.

 

Of course, it's ideal to see it in person.  I don't find a lot brick and mortar stores that you can walk into and get exotic gemstones though.  I live in area of the country where jewelry is big business and has its own district.

 

Larger stones have better color saturation (just like with many other stones).

 

http://www.gia.edu/morganite-quality-factors

 

 

Color
Morganite’s color range includes pink, rose, peach, and salmon. In today’s market, the pink and rose tints are more fashionable. The peach and salmon hues seem less popular, but some collectors value untreated peach-colored material more highly than heat-treated pink stones.

The gem is almost always heat-treated to improve the pink color. The treatment is not detectable. Heat drives off the yellow or orange tinge, leaving a purer and more attractive pink. The resulting color is stable and won’t fade.

 

Cut
Because morganite has distinct pleochroism—pale pink and a deeper bluish pink—it’s necessary to orient the rough carefully for fashioning. Strong hues in morganite are rare, and gems usually have to be fairly large to achieve the finest color. Morganite is cut in all standard shapes and sizes as well as in unique designer cuts.


 

Good info. I posted in reply to your absolutes. Not all stones are treated, color saturation isn't always dependent on size, and larger stones won't always have better color. Usually, some, many etc isn't same as all or always, which was my only point about that. 

 

Super Contributor
Posts: 338
Registered: ‎05-17-2012

Re: Pink Morganite

I, too, wish she had a section on her website for reviews. That seems highly unlikely though considering LR does not take criticism well. She would be highly offended if someone posted a negative review.
Super Contributor
Posts: 348
Registered: ‎10-15-2010

Re: Pink Morganite

@SeaMaiden. Thought it was a weird photo too. Maybe she is laughing. Yes, that makes sense. Laughing all the way to the bank.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: Pink Morganite


@Juniebugz wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Juniebugz wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@sunchild wrote:
I have seen some gorgeous morganite pieces in my travels and this does not compare! Perhaps you can do some comparison shopping before you purchase. What she is offering is inferior in quality. The stones in her piece are enhanced by the rose gold PLATING. Quality morganite should stand on it's own in color.

Not sure how you can determine this w/o having first seen it.  All of the stones goes through some type of "treatment" whether it's set in rose gold or white gold.  In addition most folk know that color saturation is dependent also on the size of the stone.  Larger stones will have better color.


 

Some stones are treated. Not all stones. Also color saturation can be just as good in a small stone of good quality. And it's well known the rose gold is often used to play up the pink in a stone. Good morganite is very expensive and if I recollect correctly shouldn't have gray color. I think @sunchild is correct that stones are better seen in person but of course it's normal to buy online in today's world.

 


Most Morganite stones are irradiated.  If she had untreated stones here, there is no way in the world she could only charge $399.99 for the bracelet.  Not at such a low price point.  Color, Carat weight applies to color gemstones just like it does diamonds.

 

Of course, it's ideal to see it in person.  I don't find a lot brick and mortar stores that you can walk into and get exotic gemstones though.  I live in area of the country where jewelry is big business and has its own district.

 

Larger stones have better color saturation (just like with many other stones).

 

http://www.gia.edu/morganite-quality-factors

 

 

Color
Morganite’s color range includes pink, rose, peach, and salmon. In today’s market, the pink and rose tints are more fashionable. The peach and salmon hues seem less popular, but some collectors value untreated peach-colored material more highly than heat-treated pink stones.

The gem is almost always heat-treated to improve the pink color. The treatment is not detectable. Heat drives off the yellow or orange tinge, leaving a purer and more attractive pink. The resulting color is stable and won’t fade.

 

Cut
Because morganite has distinct pleochroism—pale pink and a deeper bluish pink—it’s necessary to orient the rough carefully for fashioning. Strong hues in morganite are rare, and gems usually have to be fairly large to achieve the finest color. Morganite is cut in all standard shapes and sizes as well as in unique designer cuts.


 

I posted in reply to your absolutes. Not all stones are treated, color saturation isn't always dependent on size, and larger stones won't always have better color. Usually, some, many etc isn't same as all or always, which was my only point about that.

 


It is for Morganite.  Not so much for Garnet and some other stones.  Did you read the GIA article?  It's accurate.  The vast majority of Morganite stones sold in the USA are treated.  Very rare that they are not.  In this case, the likelihood that they are treated is a tell tale sign because of the price.

*Call Tyrone*
Valued Contributor
Posts: 542
Registered: ‎05-20-2015

Re: Pink Morganite

[ Edited ]

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Juniebugz wrote:

  • @itiswhatitis wrote:

    @Juniebugz wrote:

    @itiswhatitis wrote:

    @sunchild wrote:
    I have seen some gorgeous morganite pieces in my travels and this does not compare! Perhaps you can do some comparison shopping before you purchase. What she is offering is inferior in quality. The stones in her piece are enhanced by the rose gold PLATING. Quality morganite should stand on it's own in color.

    Not sure how you can determine this w/o having first seen it.  All of the stones goes through some type of "treatment" whether it's set in rose gold or white gold.  In addition most folk know that color saturation is dependent also on the size of the stone.  Larger stones will have better color.


     

    Some stones are treated. Not all stones. Also color saturation can be just as good in a small stone of good quality. And it's well known the rose gold is often used to play up the pink in a stone. Good morganite is very expensive and if I recollect correctly shouldn't have gray color. I think @sunchild is correct that stones are better seen in person but of course it's normal to buy online in today's world.

     


    Most Morganite stones are irradiated.  If she had untreated stones here, there is no way in the world she could only charge $399.99 for the bracelet.  Not at such a low price point.  Color, Carat weight applies to color gemstones just like it does diamonds.

     

    Of course, it's ideal to see it in person.  I don't find a lot brick and mortar stores that you can walk into and get exotic gemstones though.  I live in area of the country where jewelry is big business and has its own district.

     

    Larger stones have better color saturation (just like with many other stones).

     

    http://www.gia.edu/morganite-quality-factors

     

     

    Color
    Morganite’s color range includes pink, rose, peach, and salmon. In today’s market, the pink and rose tints are more fashionable. The peach and salmon hues seem less popular, but some collectors value untreated peach-colored material more highly than heat-treated pink stones.

    The gem is almost always heat-treated to improve the pink color. The treatment is not detectable. Heat drives off the yellow or orange tinge, leaving a purer and more attractive pink. The resulting color is stable and won’t fade.

     

    Cut
    Because morganite has distinct pleochroism—pale pink and a deeper bluish pink—it’s necessary to orient the rough carefully for fashioning. Strong hues in morganite are rare, and gems usually have to be fairly large to achieve the finest color. Morganite is cut in all standard shapes and sizes as well as in unique designer cuts.


 

I posted in reply to your absolutes. Not all stones are treated, color saturation isn't always dependent on size, and larger stones won't always have better color. Usually, some, many etc isn't same as all or always, which was my only point about that.

 


It is for Morganite.  Not so much for Garnet and some other stones.  Did you read the GIA article?  It's accurate.  The vast majority of Morganite stones sold in the USA are treated.  Very rare that they are not.  In this case, the likelihood that they are treated is a tell tale sign because of the price.


 

Already responded. You used absolute qualifiers such as "all." Not the same as "most" or "vast majority." Again that was my point. Plus the fact that rose gold is often used to play up pink in a stone. I agree with most of what you posted.

 

Super Contributor
Posts: 338
Registered: ‎05-17-2012

Re: Pink Morganite

Totally off topic but if you look at her FB page and her latest picture, she has a new choker she's presenting tomorrow night. Looks a little odd.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,635
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Pink Morganite

I am getting more and more confused as to what direction Lisa  is going in?  Seems she is jumping all over the place.