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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,585
Registered: ‎06-13-2011

@Mominohio wrote:

I have a small collection of old phones. 

 

I have a candlestick (original) that still works. No dial on it, it is a leftover from the era where you asked the operator to 'get me Aunt Bea' and they put you through. I had it hooked up in my old house, and it was great to use to answer and talk on, just no dialing out, as there was no dial!

 

I have a rotary dial phone from the 1940's on my desk. I've never hooked that one up, just like the look of it. 

 

We have a couple of phones from the 60's and 70's like princess phone, and wall rotary. 

 

 


I love the fact that a few of you collect phones from the past.   Your phone from the 40's is certainly a real collector piece.  The candlestick phone is such a nod to the past.

 

I think it's such a great idea to have those older phones.  What memories they evoke.

 

I wish I had held on to my old phones instead of donating them when I got a new phone.

I particularly wish I had kept my Snoopy phone.  I have a small collection of Peanuts collectibles and that phone would have been a great addition.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,650
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@azgal wrote:

@aubnwa01 I worked at Pacific NW bell in 1984 too. I lived in Spokane at the time.

I thought it was a good company to work for at that time.

 

My great aunt worked as an operator in 1906 San Francisco. When she turned 100 the newspaper interviewed her about working during the earthquake. They had some old photos. It was fun to see. Little did I know I would work at the phone company for over 25 years.


@azgal  I started in Los Angeles in '73 with PT&T & transferred to PNB in '77.  PNB was the best co. I ever worked for, love it. I worked on the western side of WA for PNB, USW & Qwest.  Thankfully, I was gone before CLink took over & I think it's now Lumen or something?  It's hard to keep track, it seems like there's a new co. name every time I turn around!  My former coworkers & friends that are still working there are not happy & just counting the days to make their escapes.

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Posts: 2,743
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

The first phone I remember was a large wooden box which mounted on the wall, and had a crank on the side, you held one cone-shaped device to your ear and spoke into the other one which was permanently attached to the front of the box.  You didn't dial a number, you cranked the handle and spoke into the phone, and an operator came on the line and asked you what number you were calling.  Our number was WAbash-83734, and we shared that with three other homes, all lines were party lines.  I remember my Mom picking up the phone, hearing other people talking, and hanging the earpiece back up again, that was the only way you knew if the party line was busy.  We weren't on a party line for long, and we kept the Wabash number for decades, until my parents both died and I had to sell my childhood home.  I wish I knew where that old phone wound up, it was a beautiful piece of furniture, the wood was polished and varnished, and I imagine the black plastic material of the earpiece and mouthpiece were something similar to Bakelite.

 

Thanks for the happy memories, @J Town Girl !

Valued Contributor
Posts: 819
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Telephones of the past.

[ Edited ]

@aubnwa01 wrote:

@azgal wrote:

@aubnwa01 I worked at Pacific NW bell in 1984 too. I lived in Spokane at the time.

I thought it was a good company to work for at that time.

 

My great aunt worked as an operator in 1906 San Francisco. When she turned 100 the newspaper interviewed her about working during the earthquake. They had some old photos. It was fun to see. Little did I know I would work at the phone company for over 25 years.


@azgal  I started in Los Angeles in '73 with PT&T & transferred to PNB in '77.  PNB was the best co. I ever worked for, love it. I worked on the western side of WA for PNB, USW & Qwest.  Thankfully, I was gone before CLink took over & I think it's now Lumen or something?  It's hard to keep track, it seems like there's a new co. name every time I turn around!  My former coworkers & friends that are still working there are not happy & just counting the days to make their escapes.


@aubnwa01 That's so funny. I started at  PT&T too in the SF bay area. 

Us West, Quest, Century Link and now Lumin. One of my co-worker's son still works for the company and he said they are trying to sell it again!

ETA: I missed your post about being in Tucson. I'm a little north of Phoenix. Small world!

 

“We should be too big to take offense and too noble to give it.” Abraham Lincoln
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,850
Registered: ‎06-08-2021

I always wanted a Princess rotary phone with a light-up dial, it just seemed so glamorous to me. LOL

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Posts: 3,526
Registered: ‎06-24-2011

My grandmother had narcolepsy. My grandfather would get upset if she fell asleep while in the middle of playing Canasta with guests, during dinner, etc. But what I remember most as a little girl is their black wall phone. My dad took a picture of my grandmother leaning against the archway between the kitchen and the dining room. She had the black phone receiver propped against her ear and the archway, and she was fast asleep.

Contributor
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎08-20-2010

We had a black rotary phone that sat on a ledge in the kitchen with a long extention cord. We were on a party line in the country and when I was a teenager I would carry the phone into the hall for privacy and my dad would time me so neighbors wouldn't get upset. I later found out that one neighbor listened to some of my calls just for fun. I was upset but I really made sure to limit my calls after that.  We also only dialed five numbers. Ha

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Posts: 493
Registered: ‎02-25-2020

@CamilleP wrote:

The first phone I remember was a large wooden box which mounted on the wall, and had a crank on the side, you held one cone-shaped device to your ear and spoke into the other one which was permanently attached to the front of the box.  You didn't dial a number, you cranked the handle and spoke into the phone, and an operator came on the line and asked you what number you were calling.  Our number was WAbash-83734, and we shared that with three other homes, all lines were party lines.  I remember my Mom picking up the phone, hearing other people talking, and hanging the earpiece back up again, that was the only way you knew if the party line was busy.  We weren't on a party line for long, and we kept the Wabash number for decades, until my parents both died and I had to sell my childhood home.  I wish I knew where that old phone wound up, it was a beautiful piece of furniture, the wood was polished and varnished, and I imagine the black plastic material of the earpiece and mouthpiece were something similar to Bakelite.

 

Thanks for the happy memories, @J Town Girl !


I thought I was the only one who could remember our old phone number from so long ago!  When I was growing up our number was TErrace 4-4880.  Anyone else remember their childhood phone number?

Man plans. God laughs.
Valued Contributor
Posts: 581
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I worked as a service rep for Michigan Bell in the early 70s for a few years. Our job was to take installation orders from the customers and to upsell them to get the Princess or Trimline model phones. If you sold so many of each style they would give you a charm for your bracelet. I had a full bracelet, but always felt a tiny bit guilty that I made the customer spend more money. The upcharge was something like 50 cents a month! 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,850
Registered: ‎06-08-2021

I have a small collection also. A couple of Ericofons and a couple of French phones. I've always loved phones.Last time I tried them, they all worked.