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Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Two years ago, I cleaned a seventy year old bedroom set. It sat in a farmhouse that was heated with a wood burning furnace, so it was dirty and had a few scratches. I used Howard's finish restoring cleaner and I'm happy with the result. Sure, a few minor scratches show, but they are not as noticeable as before. The quote to refinish was $900 and I'm glad I was able to keep the original finish for $20.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,354
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@NameAlreadyTaken 

@Auntg 

 

That's the product my RE agent recommended, but it seemed to me that was more restoration than cleaner. I'm going to watch the video posted. It certainly worth a try.

~ house cat ~
~ leaving los angeles ~
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,837
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@house_cat  I wanted to add that I think your set is a candidate for a thorough cleaning. If you want it to look perfect, then I understand doing a full restoration. However, I truly think the joy of family antiques comes from showing some of the wear. I think the bedroom set you got from your mother is beautiful. 

Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎05-15-2014

@Auntg  ITA,  I was thinking the very same thing.  Would be nice to keep some of the charm.   We had an old hutch refinished from my hubby's grandmother.  It is worth the money because it removed all the gunk and restored the finish beautifully, it did lose a bit of the nostalgia but it was like a brand new piece.  The best part, all we did was take it there and pick it up Smiley Happy

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Posts: 392
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: How can I clean this?

[ Edited ]

@house_catYou are right, there is no point in putting any product on until the furniture is clean. To remove the gunk, you'll need to determine what was in the products you used; was it wax or silicone or a combination. I'm old school, so I would suggest searching wikihow on how to remove wax. The vinegar & water, or vinegar, water, and cream of tartar method sound reasonable to me.

Once you've cleaned and restored the finish, I would suggest you don't need to wax it more than once a year. I don't use use wax at all. In the spring, I use Murphy's Oil Soap on all my furniture and once it's dry, I put a few drops of the Food for Varnish on a damp cloth and wipe the furniture, or woodwork & cabinets down. Both Weiman & Guardsman make wax & silicone free polishes for regular use.

It  sound like a lot of work, but you get into a groove & it goes fast. The finished result will be most rewarding, and you can tell yourself you won't have to go through that again! You may even decide the pieces don't need refinishing. Good luck!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,700
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

If it's of value to you, I would hire someone to do the restoration.

♥Surface of the Sun♥
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Re: How can I clean this?

[ Edited ]

@house_cat At one time I restored antique furniture from my grandmother.  Stripped it and then stained with using Minwax products.  I would Google to see if there is a home remedy like vinegar with something that will help you out. I know that vinegar aids with build up.   BTW  it is a lovley piece from what I can see.

kindness is strength
Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,000
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I have used this produdct to revive 40+year old cabinet doors...It did a great job but I do not think of it as a cleaner.  I used dark walnut I believe, the doors look great.

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Posts: 3,886
Registered: ‎10-03-2014

@house_cat 

 

The piece in this photo looks like it was handmade, so it's very special.  

 

Restoration is a no, no.  It reduces the value of old furniture.  I wouldn't do that.  Nicks, scratches, and dents are expected on furniture this old.

 

I would use a good antique furniture cleaner that does not have silicone in it.  I have used "Liberon Polish and Wax Remover."  It's gentle for antiques...French polishes, varnish, lacquer and oil finishes.  Test first in an inconspicuous area.  

 

Then two thin coats of an antique paste wax again with no silicone in it.  I use "Antiquax" used by museums on their antique furniture.  

 

You shouldn't need to wax it again for several to  five years.  I dust with a very damp cloth making sure the surface is totally dry afterwards.

 

Touch up the scratches with a scratch pen the same color as your furniture.  Minwax makes good ones.  For deeper scratches and dents, Minwax furniture crayons work well.  

 

Post a before and after photo when you're done. 

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,354
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Foxxee 

 

Thank you. I get the best information on this forum - it's the first place I look when I have this sort of question.  

 

I will most definitely post before and after photos!

~ house cat ~
~ leaving los angeles ~