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Honored Contributor
Posts: 49,104
Registered: ‎03-29-2012

Re: Framing Scarves

@Kachina624 

It won't be a problem.  Mine was also silk and thin.  Mine is permanently mounted, because I wasn't going to wear it either.  I had to do a double frame, because the frame had to be a certain width to support the size of the glass.  I believe it was 34", although the exact size was custom too.  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,260
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

@Kachina624 - That scarf is absolutely gorgeous. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,431
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

That's a beautiful scarf @Kachina624 .

My little dog, a heartbeat at my feet. —Edith Wharton
What greater gift than the love of a cat.--Charles Dickens





Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,402
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

I’ve had several fragile items float mounted, and it does cost more but definitely worth it IMO.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,422
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

Re: Framing Scarves

@Drythe I would love to see some of your scarves if you don't mind posting them.Smiley Happy

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,290
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: Framing Scarves

I love your scarf @Kachina624 .

I know a person who worked at an art-framing shop. We we personal friends so I got to learn a few things about framing in general. One thing that you might want to consider if you do decide to frame your scarf, is to choose a non-glare glass in your piece. I'm pretty sure you know about this kind of glass.  I have several lithos framed with it and it makes such a difference.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 650
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

I retired several years ago after having my own frame shop for 43 years.  I agree that a custom framer is the way to go on something that is important to you.

 

A lot goes into  framing a scarf or fabric that you don't see.

The fabric should not touch the glass, so depending on the look you desire, matting can be used, or spacers that lift the glass.

 

I would not recommend non-glare glass on any art piece since it needs to be right next to the art in order to achieve clarity.  There are other glass options that have UV protection or "glare free clear glass.

 

The frame will need to be fairly heavy in order to support the weight of the glass, if the scarf is large.  If less frame is your choice, look at a harder wood such as oak.  Double framing is a nice look, but should not be necessary.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,966
Registered: ‎07-09-2011

Re: Framing Scarves

@Libbylady 

 

What a variety of pieces you must have seen in your work;  I bet some amazing, some beautiful, and some ... interesting!  People do frame all kinds of things, don’t they?

 

Just based on my own eye, I like free and clear glass much more than non-glare which makes things look ‘fuzzy’ to me.  

 

If you don’t mind, would you share some of the most interesting / unusual things your clients brought in?

 

Thanks!

 

 

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,476
Registered: ‎10-27-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

@Kachina624 

Loose except for the top, so one can really see what the item is. A deckle-edge block print, for example, would typically be floated so one can see the edges. The scarf is so lovely that I would think floating it with only the top attached would be wonderful. A good framer, ideally a textiles specialist, would be able to recommend the appropriate way to attach the top.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,067
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Framing Scarves

I have several LB pins, totes, and scarves I bought probably 20 years ago...didn’t know she did horses...