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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,582
Registered: ‎07-09-2010

This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

I planted 3 varieties of string beans this year - never grew beans before

was so excited to harvest them -

one or two a day then

a few ounces a day

6 ouces per day..... yes- I weighed them cuz you know - new mom

 

then the heat came - a few brown leaves

string beans on the vine went limp and fell off

we have had 3 days of mid 90s 

most ot the leaves are brown

a few plants that were sown later are faring much better

 

this was an impromptu pic I took July 4th - 

I loved it - I also grew the raspberries 

 

temps are going down to the 80s for the next week and hoping for new growth

I would be extremely sad if this was the end

 

 

Screenshot 2023-07-29 at 5.27.36 PM.png

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,694
Registered: ‎03-15-2021

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

I like your arrangement. I know drought and high temps are an impossible combination for garden vegetables. My cousin was a expert gardener, and she only got one meal from her garden beans during a tough year. The bean plants may need more water than normal during these hot days.

 

I know enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be helpful. I tend to overwater everything, but it seems like the likely culprit. Hopefully the milder days ahead will allow the late plantings to produce.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,694
Registered: ‎03-15-2021

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

@Yahooey You are not alone in fighting the hot weather. KOB-TV Albuquerque ran a story a few minutes ago that the chile harvest is early this year due to hot weather. It sounds like those plants were stressed, too.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 38,343
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it


@Yahooey wrote:

I planted 3 varieties of string beans this year - never grew beans before

was so excited to harvest them -

one or two a day then

a few ounces a day

6 ouces per day..... yes- I weighed them cuz you know - new mom

 

then the heat came - a few brown leaves

string beans on the vine went limp and fell off

we have had 3 days of mid 90s 

most ot the leaves are brown

a few plants that were sown later are faring much better

 

this was an impromptu pic I took July 4th - 

I loved it - I also grew the raspberries 

 

temps are going down to the 80s for the next week and hoping for new growth

I would be extremely sad if this was the end

 

 

Screenshot 2023-07-29 at 5.27.36 PM.png

 

 


@Yahooey   Beans love heat, but they have to be watered as most fruit and veges do, more than some plants.  I used to grow them, yours look good.  I gave up because the critters eat everything, but for years I grew everything, even watermelons, the small type.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,630
Registered: ‎11-08-2020

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

@Yahooey , the veggie garden situation in Nova Scotia has been hard this year.  Way too much rain, flooding and every insect you can imagine.  Many lost everything in the garden in floods.  All that work for no reward.  So disappointing.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,377
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

Beans tend to have a short season. They flower all at once, bear fruit all at once, and then are done. That's why succession planting is recommended for beans. (And most other crops also.) The general rule for beans is to plant a new crop every ten days. That ensures a steady harvest all through the growing season. If you plant once and are done, you harvest pretty much all at once (or within a couple of weeks) and get no more. 

 

Succession planting is important if you want a nonstop supply of fresh from the garden produce. If you're planning to can or freeze the surplus, planting a huge crop all at once makes more sense, but if you want a steady supply of a crop all season, succession planting is the way to go.

 

There are succession planting charts for vegetables all over the internet that show what the chart makers feel is the correct interval for each type of vegetable. (It can vary a bit from chart to chart.) Things like beans, corn, peas, etc. tend to flower and produce in short intervals so if you want a steady supply you need to replant regularly. A new crop going into the ground every ten days should keep you steadily supplied for most of the growing season.

 

 

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,582
Registered: ‎07-09-2010

Re: This cannot be the end.... I refuse to believe it

@gardenman 

 

these are pole beans and dont really fruit all at once 

as the vines continue to shoot out - there are flowers and beans

 

bush beans - may be that case 

 

i have put in some new beans - and see what happens