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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,652
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Looking for advice.  We just edged a large bed and mulched.  The edging cut was pretty deep (5”?).  We then wedged out the sod.  That left an indentation as you would expect.  Do you fill in this trough with mulch or just keep the mulch in the bed.

 

Also, any tips, tricks or magic would be appreciated.  I hate when the lawn slips into my beds.  Some of them have a stone border, some do not.  It is the ones that do not that I am curious about.  TIA.  LM

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,081
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Edging garden beds

[ Edited ]

My borders are all bricked where lawn borders the landscape except for front landscaping which has Belgium blocks. If you want it to ‘flow’ I would mulch to the lawn. 

 

Many years ago there used to be a brick company on LI that made scalloped brick with a mowing strip in front of them. That would be a great solution too if you could find similar where you are. 

☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,460
Registered: ‎05-12-2012

my goodness...your gardens are beautiful!  i get exhausted just looking at them!  i don't have any help with edging.....don't think i've ever held a garden tool!!  but i'm sure you will find a solution!  your pictures belong in a gardening magazine!!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,336
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

My gardens are surrounded with bricks. It is a real pain keeping them "edged" as string trimmers are a hassle and you can't really use a good edging tool like I can along the street curbing. I also use weed killer at times. The beds are mulched, but weeds are still an issue. Here is what they look like when freshly done.

SEcorner1_26_18A.JPG

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
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Registered: ‎04-14-2013

I am adamant about leaving the furrow around the bed, and berming up the planting area for some contour, and drainage.

 

We will sometimes trace a line with a stone called "Seminole Chips", as a demarcation between the bed and the surrounding area, but I still insist on a grade change.

 

It requires upkeep.  Plants grow, land shifts, rain falls.  Edges change and need to be sharpened.  The sharp spade is my friend, as is the manual wheel edging tool (with handle).


Cogito ergo sum
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 97
Registered: ‎02-15-2014

Sweetbay magnolia, I am with you about keeping the furrow around the bed.  I use what they call in England an edging knife to to keep it!   Its not a knife at all as it has a long handle with a little "t" shaped bar on the stop and you step on it to cut into the lawn. I also bought the spear head garden shovel right here from QVC --M56539 and it works very well, in fact I found it to work easier as I have some very tough zoysia grass and it slices into it easily.  I think this is a great polished look for the flower bed!

Esteemed Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Sweetbay magnolia@Kkins@StylishLady@nana59@JustJazzmom Thanks for your comments.  I filled in the trench with mulch.  

 

Costco has a new item this year (here in Nova Scotia) that I may check out.  It is rubberized, probably about 3” tall, shapeable amd has a mowing strip.  It goes into the ground with large stakes.  The only thing that makes me hesitate is the frost may heave the stakes.  LM

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,908
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Hi @Lilysmom

Because my beds are so big we had them curbed with concrete edging.  It does prevent the grass from migrating into the beds and keeps the mulch in.  I still have to use the string trimmer periodically because the mower blade can't get close enough to edging to keep it neat looking.  Anyway, I don't think our solution would look good in your gardens.

 

Years ago I visited some professional/city gardens in Niagara and at the time they were using a heavy metal edging.  It appeared to be placed pretty deep into the soil and only protruded slightly above the soil line so the mowing blades wouldn't hit it.  Placing it deep probably helped in keeping it stabilized to prevent the heave from winter freeze/thaw.

 

When we had our beds edged and mulched by landscapers they did bring the mulch out to the cut line.  But grass/weeds did migrate.  

 

A edging product that caught my eye is manufactured by Dimex.  You might want to give it a look.

 

Happy gardening!

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,652
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Allegheny, thanks for the feedback.  I will have a look at Dimex.  I do like your idea of concrete edging.  I am sure it looks very clean.

 

Here is the Costco version.  It is rubber so it is pliable.  I like that.  I may try it on a small bed and see how it performs.

 

3EB16513-E163-4E76-B4C9-8FA6DB192455.jpeg

 

I went to Niagara on the Canadian side a few years ago.  The landscaping was really beautiful.  Of course, they are in the sunbelt with long seasons.  I am happy to be here in the Maritimes.  It is getting so hot now everywhere that living coastal four seasons is not like it used to be.  It seems like we go from winter to summer, no spring at all.

 

I did a Masters degree in marine management graduating in 1996.  At the time, I was surprised to see in the marine ecosystem lectures quite a few insurance companies represented.  Now I totally get it.  The ocean conveyor belt has a huge impact on climate and insurance claims for weather related phenomenon are skyrocketing.

 

If I do the Costco test, I will post the results next year, God willing!  LM

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,908
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

@Lilysmom  That edging is quite nice.  Appearance wise it is very similar to concrete curbing.  Since your gardens have such a natural appearance I wasn't sure it would be something you would consider.

 

We are very pleased with ours.  It has been in three years and we have not had any issues with moving or lifting.  We were able to pick the style, pattern and color.  We apply a sealer once a year.  While some people would consider it too costly; to us, it was well worth it in regards to appearance and lessening of maintenance.

 

I'll be looking forward to future photos.