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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎11-08-2020

@JustJazzmom @Sweetbay magnolia @mousiegirl @lulu2  and my other gardening friends, I have a question for you.  Photos help...

 

There is a Yew on either side of this photo.  The one on the left is thriving.  The one on the right not so much.  This is a shady well drained location.  The yew in front of the white panel is the one not doing as well.  Immediately behind the white panel is a pine tree.  I am wondering if the pine is having an adverse affect on the yew.

 

Thoughts?  TIA.  LM

 

PS, might this be a good spot fir a rhodo?  My inclination is to move the yew that is not thriving.

 

 

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Posts: 17,703
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Lilysmom1  Glad you didn't get too much of Elsa by you. 

Not sure what is going on with it -- too much water or not as well drained as you might think? Look at the roots-- see if they are sturdy & not mushy. Are they spread out in outer directions? Or some turned inward towards the center? 

If you are considering a rhododendron, look for smaller varieties. I have 'Yaku Prince' which right now gets about 4' wide & 3' high. It blooms by me in April. Initially when I bought it I wrapped it in burlap & used an anti-desiccant on the leaves prior wrapping. It has rose pink buds opening to a deeper color apple blossom bloom. 

This is a photo of mine when it bloomed this year.

 

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☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼
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@Lilysmom1   Yews do like acidic soil, which pine needles would supply, so maybe the pine tree roots are crowding the Yew, think you are right to move it, as I doubt it will improve, only get worse.

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Posts: 38,343
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@JustJazzmom wrote:

@Lilysmom1  Glad you didn't get too much of Elsa by you. 

Not sure what is going on with it -- too much water or not as well drained as you might think? Look at the roots-- see if they are sturdy & not mushy. Are they spread out in outer directions? Or some turned inward towards the center? 

If you are considering a rhododendron, look for smaller varieties. I have 'Yaku Prince' which right now gets about 4' wide & 3' high. It blooms by me in April. Initially when I bought it I wrapped it in burlap & used an anti-desiccant on the leaves prior wrapping. It has rose pink buds opening to a deeper color apple blossom bloom. 

This is a photo of mine when it bloomed this year.

 

D0152341-1575-4DEA-9DD7-3621D58CA3A4.jpeg


 

@JustJazzmom   Beautiful!

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@Lilysmom1 , I'll let you pick what to replace that yew with - yes, I would probably move it to a new home, or the compost heap.  I have found, yews hit that point of no return and never get out of the "failure to thrive" zone.  Who knows.  I also think they need a tad more neutral soil than some evergreens, but also if they've been field grown, balled and burlapped, the problems start there.  They get mishandled, forget it.  100 years from now they may recover, but who has time for that?

 

Or - maybe replant it with some greensand, if you've got any around.  It has amazing restorative ability.  Fish/kelp emulsion topically and around the soil might provide a nice tonic.  Lucky yew (you) - you must not have a deer problem. They love yews!

Cogito ergo sum
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Registered: ‎11-08-2020

@Sweetbay magnolia @JustJazzmom @mousiegirl  Very informative feedback.  I do think I will move it.  I have hopes of recovery.  These yews are at least ten years old and have always thrived.

 

@JustJazzmom , I love that Rhodo.  I am going to jot down the name and see if I can find it.  That is the perfect size for this spot and the area gets the right kind of light for a rhodo.

 

This year I have been on an ornamental shrub/tree kick.  I planted four rhodos and four Japanese maples almost all of them on the perimeter of the property as understory additions.  

 

The mild winter made for plentiful blooms on everything in the garden.   While the mild winter is nice, some garden bugs are surviving the winters.  I have never seen so many slugs as I have this year.  Eew.  LM