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Registered: ‎10-20-2010

It's not about discrimination.  It's about representation and balance. 

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Carolyn gracie is overweight, yes, but she is not plus-sized. She wears a Misses 14-16.

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True, but wearing the same size as someone else doesn't mean both have the same fit, you know? Much of the clothing Amy wears is loose/hangs/drapes on her. Shawn wears her clothes very close to the body. 

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@Mz iMac 

I agree. And what I find especially unhelpful about when they say "works for every size and shape," is that NO style works for every size and shape. Why would they? That doesn't even make sense, and it makes me tend not to trust other things they say.

 

The first thing to know about a garment is if it will fit you, and QVC does a good job at offering a full range of sizes that are fairly consistent. The second thing is to know whether it will flatter you. Some presenters hint at this at times, and I agree with you that the models they use or don't use to show off an item are another good hint.

 

But you know they have some great stylists working there--I wish I could get their guidance from them. I'd probably buy more and be more satisfied. A few times in my life I've had a sales associate at a shop who told me honestly what worked best for me, and was almost always right. I paid their higher prices happily and always came back for more. That's just me, though. I'm sure a giant retailer like QVC, selling remotely and at scale, has different incentives built into their business model.

 

I expect the real answer would be to wear exactly what we liked and not concern ourselves either with what others think about us, or with what others choose for themselves. Wouldn't we all be happier? And need a lot fewer clothes, too.

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For me, I need the dress size equivalents.  I've repeatedly asked QVC to ask the hosts to include not only their letter size but also their NUMBER size. Number sizing is more precise. So for example, if a host or model wears a size small, I'd need to know if they wear a Misses 8 or 10, then I can judge how that size small fits them.

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Re: Plus size models...

[ Edited ]

I found this research:

 

1. From Medicine Net: In 1999, the average woman weighed 163.8 pounds. Today she weighs around 171 pounds.

 

2. American women aged 20 years and above weigh an average of 170.6 pounds (lbs), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Height-wise, the average adult female is 5 feet 3.7 inches, and her waist measures 38.2 inches...Out of all American adults, more than two-thirds are deemed to be “overweight” or “obese”

 

So if the average woman has a waist of 38 and weighs 170 or so, that puts her between a L and XL in an ordinary Denim&Co pair of knit pants. In the same pants, an XXXS has a 24" waist, which is about 15" less than average, and a 5X has a waist of 58", which is about 18" more than that average. 

 

We know that D&Co sizing is more generous than many retail brands, but even allowing for that, the "average" model for them to show would be L/XL. Assuming a bell-shaped curve, the XXXS and 5X ends of the range would apply to a pretty small percentage of their audience, so let's say if they showed a S, a L/XL, and a 2X, the vast majority--about 95%--of viewers would be able to see an example that is within 1 size of their own. That should be sufficient, don't you think? 

 

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I would like that models wear their correct size instead of squeezing like a sausage into two or more sizes too small! Looks horrible . 😜

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Re: Plus size models...

[ Edited ]

@secretariat I was thinking the same thing when I was watching ShopHQ over the weekend.  The model who is closer to my size, most times than not, is always at the back of the runway.  Sometimes, the cameraman does not zoom in on her, nor does she switch places with the plus size model who is at the front of the runway. 

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@secretariat wrote:

How about a few regular size models for us average size gals? It's hard for me to judge how a garment will look on me when I only see it on plus size models which there seem to be more of.......


So, tonight was a perfect example of what I'm talking about.....almost every item was shown on a really plus size model, or two...if it weren't for Courtney, I'd have no idea how  anything would look on me and, the items looked completely different on Courtney than the models, they hung better and were more flattering. This is not about body shaming, it's about equal representation for everyone. 
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If you are using Courtney as your “average” model, then you really need to reconsider your definition of average. As noted above, an average woman is much larger. No longer a size 14, the average woman is now up to a 16/18. Based on your comments, QVC seems to absolutely be showing the average.

But, sure, saying everything looked and hung better on Courtney isn’t body shaming.