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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,136
Registered: ‎06-25-2018

i might add that some folks feel a sense of entitlement and think that people owe them something and that is not true.  as my father told me, the world does not owe you anything, but you owe the world something by trying it make it a better place for all creatures.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,403
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

@blackhole99 wrote:

@fortuneI'm glad you were able to help those people out, but your situation is not the norm for homeless people.. As far as the community taking care of the homeless and abused and setting up food banks these models have been  featured many times in our local and regional newspapers and that helps bring in the donations. Folks around here with disposable income seem willing to donate money on a regular basis to keep the homeless off the streets or from pitching tents on their land. Those who have time to spare, mostly retired  folks work at the shelters and food banks, there is a retired accountant and attorney who donate their time and expertise. It's common sense, you just have to have people who care and want to do the work. I'm sure there are other small towns where people care enough about their environment and the people who live there to make helping them out a priority.


@blackhole99

The community effort in your area is spectacular!!!  I still think this is unusual and needs to be featured by a national media outlet! 16x16_heart.png

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,454
Registered: ‎01-13-2013

@fortune  I live in a rural area and there's all kinds of food banks and assistance programs around here. There's at least 1 place that serves hot meals, then lots of churches have food banks and also offer clothing and what-not to those in need.....there are several stores that sell clothing and housewares for little-or-nothing.........so I don't think it's all that unusual.

 

I think it's the cost of housing that is so daunting to the homeless population. Of course, if you have a car/truck/van, you could live in that until you get your own digs. (Assuming you can rustle up an appropriate address for your employer.)

 

I was watching youtube videos the other day about retired people who can't afford housing - they live in their CARS.....

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Posts: 3,403
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

@YorkieonmyPillow wrote:

@fortune  I live in a rural area and there's all kinds of food banks and assistance programs around here. There's at least 1 place that serves hot meals, then lots of churches have food banks and also offer clothing and what-not to those in need.....there are several stores that sell clothing and housewares for little-or-nothing.........so I don't think it's all that unusual.

 

I think it's the cost of housing that is so daunting to the homeless population. Of course, if you have a car/truck/van, you could live in that until you get your own digs. (Assuming you can rustle up an appropriate address for your employer.)

 

I was watching youtube videos the other day about retired people who can't afford housing - they live in their CARS.....


@YorkieonmyPillow

WOW! 16x16_heart.png

Regular Contributor
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎04-30-2010

It is a mistake to generalize and blame the problem on one or two things because there are numerous reasons for homelessness.  One major factor is mental illness.  In the 60s institutions that housed the mentally ill were phased out and patients discharged.  This happened in my home town.  Many were placed in private homes that were paid to house them.  Eventually many stopped taking medications lost contact with followup care  and drifted into homelessness for a multitude of reasons.  Drugs and alcohol addiction are a major factor for others.  Economic reasons of course are another factor.  However there are some who choose that way of living.  My son in law worked for the VA and there were several homeless vets who refused free housing when it was offerred.Cant say I could agree with their decision especially since they lived in a very northern environment.  Those who lost their homes due to economic reason were more willing to accept help to get back on their feet and end homelessness.  Just as there are many reasons there are many solutions but it remains a big problem.  Those of us who are somewhat comfortable can only do so much before we are in the same boat.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,085
Registered: ‎08-19-2014

   I regularly write checks & volunteer at my local food bank.Hunger, homelessness, & lack of healthcare drives me crazy!! There is no excuse for it in a wealthy society such as ours. Shame on us for not providing basic human needs to our citizens.

  We must all remember that “there but for the grace of god go I”.

   We push human rights as a necessity all over the word.As a nation we should practice what we preach.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,773
Registered: ‎06-10-2010
 
 
 

The Courtyard Offers Stability and Opportunity for Fort Wayne Youth Aging Out of Foster Care

Photograph of a two-story residential building extending around three sides of a landscaped courtyard.The Courtyard provides affordable housing with supportive services for youth aging out of foster care in a building designed to create a feeling of home. Credit: Biggs Property Management

The Courtyard in Fort Wayne, Indiana, is a 36-unit apartment building for youth aging out of foster care who earn less than 60 percent of the area median income. The development provides residents, many of whom have experienced trauma and are at risk of housing instability, with safe housing and access to an array of social services. Support services to develop self-sufficiency are available to residents who want them. In addition, Courtyard residents are empowered to play an active role in its operations through a tenant council. The Courtyard’s supportive and safe environment helps residents both stabilize their lives and advance their personal goals.

Fulfilling a Need

The Courtyard opened in 2014 as the first supportive housing in Indiana serving young adults aged 18 to 25 who are aging out of foster care, experiencing homelessness, or at risk of homelessness. In addition to 24 one-bedroom units, the two-story building consists of 12 two-bedroom units that can accommodate families. Residents are required to pay rent, but they pay no more than 30 percent of their income because the units come with Section 8 project-based vouchers from the Fort Wayne Housing Authority. The Courtyard was codeveloped by Biggs TC Development and the nonprofit Stop Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN), which is the property owner and lead social service provider. Financing for the $8.7 million development included approximately $6 million in equity from low-income housing tax credits and nearly $1 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds.

Living in a Safe Home

The development team convened focus groups, including foster care youth, during the design process. The youth expressed a desire for a feeling of home that an institutional setting does not provide. According to Kevan Biggs, president and general manager of Biggs Property Management, which manages the property, the design team responded with several specific features: building details and massing reflecting those of nearby residences, a front porch at the main entrance, an entrance lobby with a domestic décor, and a landscaped courtyard with fountain.

Another major design goal was to encourage resident interaction. To promote formal and informal socializing, the Courtyard includes various common areas and amenities, including rooms for meetings, arts and crafts activities, and fitness programs. By design, these common spaces are placed so that residents must walk to these spaces, affording opportunities to interact with other residents along the way. The building’s hallways are wide, with alcoves and recreation areas for activities such as Ping-Pong. Residents, who organize social events with encouragement and support from staff, also use the lobby and other common areas for group dinners and movies.

 

This was not the whole article.  To me we have to try to keep them under a roof and feed them first.  Literally start with just keeping them alive!  There will always be those we can't help because they don't want it and won't change their ways...but we need to at least give them incentive to try.  For those that do need and want the help, I think this is a good way to go. 

 

Honestly, when I think of all we spend on makeup, clothing, decor, concerts, and whatever else we spend these days (I speak for myself, too)....  I feel ashamed at times.  These days I'm asking myself more and more.....do I really need all this stuff?  I mean .....there are  women and children cold and hungry in the streets and we think nothing of paying over $100. for a bottle of perfume or $25 dollars for a darn lipstick.  It shouldn't be all government.  We all have to do our part.....all of us that can.  I am not judging.  I'm as guilty as anyone else.