Reply
Honored Contributor
Posts: 30,299
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes


@millieshops wrote:

Another vote for Compari.  I buy them at Publix, at Costco, and I eat them the way we used to years ago in our Pennsylvania garden years.  Wash, sprinkle lightly with salt, and enjoy.  I slice them for sandwiches, put them in recipes, and if I'm sensing my supply could get old before I use it, I make my own stewed tomatoes.  .  


 

 

@millieshops 

 

i turn my older ones into tomato paste or marinara sauce and freeze it.

 

what do you put into your stewed tomatoes? is there a recipe? that is another great idea because i love stewed tomatoes.

"If the camel once gets his nose in the tent, his body will soon follow." - Arab Proverb
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,200
Registered: ‎06-18-2018

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

I was the poster on the other thread that said you can't grow tomatoes with flavor in Florida, sandy soil, no flavor.  Thanks, I'll get the Canadian Campari tomatoes when I do my next Costco run.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,373
Registered: ‎08-22-2013

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

When you grow your own tomatoes it's really hard to get a good tasting tomato that suits you. 

Super Contributor
Posts: 320
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

Another vote for Campari tomatoes.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,864
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

@Sunshine45I use my own idea and I keep it very simple:  saute a bit of sweet onion in olive oil until translucent.  I don't measure -  just choose according to how many tomatoes need to be saved from going bad.Add the Camparis which I prefer cut into quarters.  I add fresh basil and parsley, and a bit of salt and pepper. Medium to low heat - sorry I don't think I've ever checked the timing,  but the whole process is fast.

 

Sometimes if my meal has very little fat in it, I add a bit of butter to the portion I'm going to eat.  Freezes well or keeps a few days in the refrig.

 

I'm sure there are cooks who have a more exact recipe than mine.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,773
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

I like Campari and heirlooms.

 

But the only tomatoes I'll buy now are called Kumato. They are brown in color and have the best tomato taste I've found.

 

I buy them at Trader Joe's. They come in a pack of four or five, depending upon size.

 

They should never be refrigerated. This brand of tomato seems to have a longer shelf life than others. I'm always careful to pick those that are still quite hard, and they are still perfectly ripened.

 

They originally were sold mainly in Europe but are now sold here as well. They may be sold with a different name, but you can't miss them. They are either brown or green in packages.

F.A.Q.

How are Kumato® tomatoes different from traditional tomatoes?
The colour of Kumato® tomatoes varies from dark brown to golden green. This is its natural appearance. Although they may look as if they are unripe and they will be bitter to the taste, this family of tomatoes has an authentic and intense flavour.
They are sweeter than normal tomatoes, with a contrasting slightly sour note, which makes for a unique and clearly defined taste sensation. Furthermore, Kumato® tomatoes are very juicy and firm in texture, which means they are an excellent choice when preparing delicious salads and many tomato-based recipes.
 
How can I recognise a Kumato® tomato in the store?
Genuine Kumato® and Snack Kumato® tomatoes ca

n be recognised by the special label applied to them following the final quality control. Do not accept imitations!

 

What size are Kumato® tomatoes and how much do they weigh?

 

The Kumato® is fairly standard in size, with a diameter of 5 to 6 cm. It generally weighs between 80 and 120g.

 

What is the origin of Kumato® tomatoes?

In the 1970s, Luis Ortega would often go with his father to the fields cultivated by his family in the village of Agra, on the Almerian coast. His curiosity led him to discover that the tomatoes at the end of the lines, which received less water, were a different colour, but were much more intense and sweet in flavour. Having observed this, the young farmer set himself a personal challenge: to grow a tomato with an authentic and intense flavour that was a different colour. This was how the Kumato® tomato was born, on the shores of the Mediterranean.

 

Why are Kumato® tomatoes sweeter than most tomatoes, in spite of their colour?

 

Quality is dependent on many factors, most importantly the variety and the growing conditions, but never the colour.
Kumato® tomatoes come from special tomato plants that naturally produce dark, extraordinarily sweet fruits. This is due to their "brix level" (fructose content), which is naturally higher than that of traditional red tomatoes.
Moreover, since all the tomatoes marketed under the Kumato® brand grow and ripen under optimum climatic conditions and they are carefully selected before they are commercialised, consumers can rest assured that all the fruits will have the same intensity of taste and concentration of flavour.

 

Are Kumato® tomatoes genetically modified products?

 

Not at all! Kumato® is the outstanding result of tireless efforts to apply traditional plant breeding techniques and natural cultivation methods. Its origin can be found in the wild tomatoes which grow spontaneously and which adapted to withstand the dry and salty conditions of the Mediterranean region.
Many excellent varieties have existed naturally for millions of years, and new varieties can be obtained by means of classic crossing techniques. Many of these varieties have not been cultivated on a large scale to date for several reasons, mainly related with cost and technical difficulties (they are too delicate, they do not have a high yield, they do not adapt easily to different climates, etc.). Kumato® tomatoes reflect the supreme creativity of nature, which we have successfully brought to your table at a reasonable cost and – drawing on our expertise of today’s agronomic techniques and processes – by means of natural cultivation methods!

How should Kumato® tomatoes be stored to preserve their flavour?

All Kumato® tomatoes are vine-ripened and picked when they are ready to eat, so no waiting is required – they can be eaten immediately. Uncut, they can be kept for up to 2 weeks at room temperature. It is advisable not to keep tomatoes in the refrigerator, because the cold will reduce their fructose, leading to a loss of flavour. However, Kumato® tomatoes cut into pieces or slices should be kept in the refrigerator, in a hermetically sealed plastic container.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,090
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

I'm so glad you posted this information @suzyQ3 .  I am always happy to find a new tomato to add to the mix and, if not for your post, I never would have picked these up.  I find the color and look of them slightly unappealing and, for that reason alone, wouldn't have given them a chance.  

 

I'll be looking for these the next time I go to the food store!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,773
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: and speaking about tomatoes


@Citrine2 wrote:

I'm so glad you posted this information @suzyQ3 .  I am always happy to find a new tomato to add to the mix and, if not for your post, I never would have picked these up.  I find the color and look of them slightly unappealing and, for that reason alone, wouldn't have given them a chance.  

 

I'll be looking for these the next time I go to the food store!


@Citrine2, they do look different, but I was already used to that with heirlooms. Give them a try -- no harm, no foul.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Valued Contributor
Posts: 912
Registered: ‎10-12-2016

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

Hey fancy pantsy, first, I love your nic! I started the Publix post, and yes, have had a hard time finding good tomatoes in Florida. In NY, DH and I grow Beefsteaks, Big Boys and my favorite, Plums. The Beefsteak and Big Boys, IMHO, are great sandwich and salad tomatoes, but Plums are sweeter. WIth whatever two varities I have left over at the end of the season, I add them to my Plums and make a great sauce. At the end of the season I take 2-3 days making homemade sauce that I freeze and can transport in coolers from NY to FL and have homemade sauce for a year. I've seen the Campari's but never bought them. As memory serves aren't they kinda expensive? Please advise of their best use. TIA, LuLu
Valued Contributor
Posts: 912
Registered: ‎10-12-2016

Re: and speaking about tomatoes

And, btw, speaking of veggies, my garden green peppers are ridiculously prolific. I buy Vadailla onions. Partially fry my peppers with the onions and freeze them too. Excellent for sausage and peppers, eggs and peppers, stews, and can add fresh, sauteed mushrooms as a side for steaks. Love my garden! LuLu