Reply
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,639
Registered: ‎10-04-2010

Your history

Just wanted to share these thoughts...at the age I am at now, I'm getting a magazine about the history of my state.  It's wonderful.

 

But my main reason for this, is the treasure you have in your own family, to learn about how your family came to be where you grew  up. Now some don't care, and this is just for those who do.

 

I have regrets in some areas where I didn't ask more questions of my own grandparents and learn about that.  We just take for granted, where we grew up and lived is our whole world.  Don't let the precious moments and stories of your past slip by and you miss them.

 

Some will want to do family trees, or learn about their families past and before it's too late, act now. Just an FYI I felt that I wanted to pass along.  The other thought is that, I did get some really good stories about the history from my grandmother, many years ago.  Still, there's things I wonder about that only family can answer and now I can't ask.  So while you can, and if your family is getting together this year, learn and listen. It's golden.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,123
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Your history

So true.

 

Many years ago my sister and I interviewed and videotaped our dad. We asked many questions about his life.  It became very emotional for him at one point when he began talking about our mother, who we lost when she was just 28–and he needed to step outside for a bit. Now that I’m older, I understand more fully his grief that he had never gotten over. I’m thankful to have that recording but it’s too painful for me to watch.  We have lost him, too. 

 

I wish I had my grandparents to talk to and get acquainted with. I was not mature enough to know to ask them questions. Now, I can think of so very many things I’d like to visit with them about. 

 

Very good and thought-provoking topic, @QualityGal

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,609
Registered: ‎03-10-2013

Re: Your history

@Teddie I hear you. My mom put together a "history" book for us 4 kids along with pictures and I treasure it so much. My mom has been gone eight years and to date I haven't watched the funeral video. Bless you!!

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,123
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Your history

I very much know what you mean, @OKPrincess.  Nine years for me this month on losing my dad. It’s still so painful. 

 

What a gift your mom gave you.  That is very special.  Blessings to you, too!

Valued Contributor
Posts: 912
Registered: ‎09-05-2014

Re: Your history

I am blessed to have my 97 year old father. I love visiting with him and hearing him talk about his life. He tells me the same stories over again sometimes, and feels like he's wasting my time talking about the past. He doesn't realize how fascinating his life was to me, even though I tell him, he doesn't believe me. I can't imagine living through periods of time when the television was 1st invented and seeing one for the very first time, to now, where "that's one of those computer things in your pocket (iPhone)"

Someone told me I should videotape an interview with him..I don't know what to ask.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,590
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Your history

When the old timers are talking, listen.  When they are gone, there is no retrieving those stories. I found a big surprise doing family tree research. I sure would like to know more about that, but there’s no one to ask.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,023
Registered: ‎08-25-2010

Re: Your history

I agree with all of the above recommendations. In addition, if you know they’ve got pictures or photo albums, ask them to go through them with you to identify the people in the pictures. When my MIL died, we found a crate of photo albums and many envelopes of pictures, some dating from the early 1900’s. Some show a man on a camel in front of the Sphinx and the pyramids. Others show a family in front of an old automobile (maybe a Model T). Many were not labeled and we had no idea who these people/relatives were. Now there’s no one left who can tell us who they were. Take advantage of your your family’s memories while you can. They’d probably enjoy reminiscing about old times and you might be surprised at what you can learn.

Regular Contributor
Posts: 153
Registered: ‎04-01-2010

Re: Your history

I can relate to what you all have been saying.  Me and my siblings have questions we never thought to ask years ago and now is too late.  Kids today are far too busy to have a conversation about their past.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,639
Registered: ‎10-04-2010

Re: Your history

[ Edited ]

@Quse wrote:

I am blessed to have my 97 year old father. I love visiting with him and hearing him talk about his life. He tells me the same stories over again sometimes, and feels like he's wasting my time talking about the past. He doesn't realize how fascinating his life was to me, even though I tell him, he doesn't believe me. I can't imagine living through periods of time when the television was 1st invented and seeing one for the very first time, to now, where "that's one of those computer things in your pocket (iPhone)"

Someone told me I should videotape an interview with him..I don't know what to ask.


Ask him to remember as far back as he can to begin with.  Ask about relatives, jobs, their military times, jobs they held, the cost of things they grew up with.  Ask about their hobbies, places they visited and if they sled in the winter or ice skated, or ?? depending on where they lived.  Ask how many houses they lived in.  Ask about their brothers and sisters and moms and dads and cousins and aunts and uncles. ETC. and ask about chores and what they did for entertainment, and how much gas was, and what grade they completed in school? Childhood jobs?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,162
Registered: ‎07-09-2011

Re: Your history

[ Edited ]

My 91 year old Dad remembers the first person to receive a SS check in his tiny mountain town; it was $1.00.  Betting he didn’t complain either.

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras