Reply
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,242
Registered: ‎03-29-2019

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@sidsmom wrote:

@Cakers wrote:

The push for education, especially for us boomers, came about because many of our parents never went to college.  Parents especially from the Depression era wanted better for their children.  Neither of my parents graduated high school.

 


@Cakers 

I totally disagree.

The kids graduating today are the result (most likely) of the parents

being of the ‘YUPPIE’ era of the 80s, when the corporate recruiter

was at their desk, smoking a cigarette while pouring over a mountain

of physical paper resumes full of degrees from here, there, everywhere.

I use this colorful visual to really point out the difference of then/today.

The status of a college degree was a line-in-the-sand when deciding

on who should be promoted.

That was then; this is now.

 

Parents are not of the Depression era...maybe their older

grandparents or even great-grandparents.  We’re looking at

parents today who grew up (young adults) in the 80s..their kids

are going to college.  But today vs 1980? Light-years away

in terms of opportunities. 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actually, the parents of today, most likely are "Gen X'ers", like myself. People who are in their 40's and 50's.

 

 

The "YUPPIE" parents that you are talking about, are the ones who raised us.

 

 

The Sky looks different when you have someone you love up there.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,028
Registered: ‎06-17-2015

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@sidsmom wrote:

@Cakers wrote:

The push for education, especially for us boomers, came about because many of our parents never went to college.  Parents especially from the Depression era wanted better for their children.  Neither of my parents graduated high school.

 


@Cakers 

I totally disagree.

The kids graduating today are the result (most likely) of the parents

being of the ‘YUPPIE’ era of the 80s, when the corporate recruiter

was at their desk, smoking a cigarette while pouring over a mountain

of physical paper resumes full of degrees from here, there, everywhere.

I use this colorful visual to really point out the difference of then/today.

The status of a college degree was a line-in-the-sand when deciding

on who should be promoted.

That was then; this is now.

 

Parents are not of the Depression era...maybe their older

grandparents or even great-grandparents.  We’re looking at

parents today who grew up (young adults) in the 80s..their kids

are going to college.  But today vs 1980? Light-years away

in terms of opportunities. 

 


@sidsmomI'm talking about my generation and the push to go to college.

 

I know that there are SOME generational differences.  I'm not clueless.

""Out beyond the ideas of right-doing and wrong-doing, there is a field. I will meet you there." -Rumi
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,719
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

If my child dreamed of going to MIT, had the grades to get in, and was accepted, I would do whatever it took, to make sure that they went.

 

 

After all, what if it was my child, who helped to discover the cure to a disease?

 

 

Think of all the people who help build robots and whatnot to help us with space exploration.

 

My kid could be a part of that, and I would never throw up a road block to them reaching their full potential.

 

 

Even with space travel mostly going private, who do you think helps to build those rockets, and everything?

 

People.

 

Who do you think helps to build robots?

 

People.

 

My child could be one of those people, and no way in hell would I stand in their way, and say, "No, you can't go."

 

 

 

 

 


MIT is not the only school that have amazing programs.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I never said that it was, but MIT is the school that we're talking about here, isn't it?


You are equating the persons success to this school.  The student can be just as successful, perhaps even more and also attend a different school.  One more affordable. 

You never look good trying to make someone else look bad.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,142
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Your child gets into MIT....

My children wanted to do it  themselves. It is important to some people to be self sufficient

 

They both are happy and successful in their fields

 

I  wouldn't blame parents for   not sending their child ,to a school beyond their means.  People have to save for retirement too ,and may well have more than one child to educate.

 

There are many fine schools in the US, and many people live happy successful lives going to another college

 

Sometimes you have to cut your coat ,to fit your cloth, and that is a valuable lesson in itself.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,673
Registered: ‎11-25-2011

Re: Your child gets into MIT....

[ Edited ]

But the OP was directly talking about entering college today.

The 18yr old of today, not your parent’s parent’s of yesteryear.

Generations change...even more so with the kids becoming

of age today. 

 

 

Can’t help but think if the 18yr old given $200,000 for a

college degree for many would be met w/ the same

enthusiasm as $200,000 to open, say, a CrossFit facility?  

No guarantee with either one.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,242
Registered: ‎03-29-2019

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

If my child dreamed of going to MIT, had the grades to get in, and was accepted, I would do whatever it took, to make sure that they went.

 

 

After all, what if it was my child, who helped to discover the cure to a disease?

 

 

Think of all the people who help build robots and whatnot to help us with space exploration.

 

My kid could be a part of that, and I would never throw up a road block to them reaching their full potential.

 

 

Even with space travel mostly going private, who do you think helps to build those rockets, and everything?

 

People.

 

Who do you think helps to build robots?

 

People.

 

My child could be one of those people, and no way in hell would I stand in their way, and say, "No, you can't go."

 

 

 

 

 


MIT is not the only school that have amazing programs.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I never said that it was, but MIT is the school that we're talking about here, isn't it?


You are equating the persons success to this school.  The student can be just as successful, perhaps even more and also attend a different school.  One more affordable. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, they can, but if my child wanted to go to MIT, and was accepted by MIT, I would make sure that they attended MIT, which could be the first step to them discovering something that helps all of man (and woman!) kind.

The Sky looks different when you have someone you love up there.
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,719
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

If my child dreamed of going to MIT, had the grades to get in, and was accepted, I would do whatever it took, to make sure that they went.

 

 

After all, what if it was my child, who helped to discover the cure to a disease?

 

 

Think of all the people who help build robots and whatnot to help us with space exploration.

 

My kid could be a part of that, and I would never throw up a road block to them reaching their full potential.

 

 

Even with space travel mostly going private, who do you think helps to build those rockets, and everything?

 

People.

 

Who do you think helps to build robots?

 

People.

 

My child could be one of those people, and no way in hell would I stand in their way, and say, "No, you can't go."

 

 

 

 

 


MIT is not the only school that have amazing programs.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I never said that it was, but MIT is the school that we're talking about here, isn't it?


You are equating the persons success to this school.  The student can be just as successful, perhaps even more and also attend a different school.  One more affordable. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, they can, but if my child wanted to go to MIT, and was accepted by MIT, I would make sure that they attended MIT, which could be the first step to them discovering something that helps all of man (and woman!) kind.


Once again attending another school would not exclude a student from doing this....why continue to credit the school for success rather than the students hard work.

 

 

You never look good trying to make someone else look bad.
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,242
Registered: ‎03-29-2019

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

If my child dreamed of going to MIT, had the grades to get in, and was accepted, I would do whatever it took, to make sure that they went.

 

 

After all, what if it was my child, who helped to discover the cure to a disease?

 

 

Think of all the people who help build robots and whatnot to help us with space exploration.

 

My kid could be a part of that, and I would never throw up a road block to them reaching their full potential.

 

 

Even with space travel mostly going private, who do you think helps to build those rockets, and everything?

 

People.

 

Who do you think helps to build robots?

 

People.

 

My child could be one of those people, and no way in hell would I stand in their way, and say, "No, you can't go."

 

 

 

 

 


MIT is not the only school that have amazing programs.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I never said that it was, but MIT is the school that we're talking about here, isn't it?


You are equating the persons success to this school.  The student can be just as successful, perhaps even more and also attend a different school.  One more affordable. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, they can, but if my child wanted to go to MIT, and was accepted by MIT, I would make sure that they attended MIT, which could be the first step to them discovering something that helps all of man (and woman!) kind.


Once again attending another school would not exclude a student from doing this....why continue to credit the school for success rather than the students hard work.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

And once again, yes, they can achieve success at another school, as well as achieving success at MIT.

The Sky looks different when you have someone you love up there.
Contributor
Posts: 61
Registered: ‎10-22-2018

Re: Your child gets into MIT....

[ Edited ]

I wish we had the voices of the K-12 naysayers here. Naysaying in spite of what must have been great report cards. Somehow I feel their words are still having an influence on the situation.

 

Through undergrad and 3 years of graduate school I constantly disappointed professors with my ******-poor classroom performance. Later they would express surprise at my top 5% class ranking and multiple academic honors.

 

I was in my 30s by the time I learned I had the unusual combination of high IQ and really slow thought processing. I would have been the world's worst courtroom lawyer. I became more successful at meetings and group discussions by using adult cheat sheets.

 

This student has learned how to be successful. He will continue to refine that skill in the super-competitive world of MIT. He deserves to go there.

 

Find a way to get him there. Odds are his parents will not have "signed their life away."

 

 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,569
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Your child gets into MIT....


@SahmIam wrote:

Your child is accepted into MIT. You can NOT afford the tuition. Your child has a college trust that will cover in-state tuition for all 4 years and but will only cover 1/2 year at MIT. Your child does NOT qualify for financial aid. Your child does NOT qualify for any type of scholarship. You will NOT co-sign a loan. 

 

As a parent, how do deal with the fact that your child can't go to a college he/she has dreamed about but won't be able to attend. Yes, the child can go into debt: their loan would be approximately $254,000 plus.

 

There are those who believe the debt is justified and will be paid off soon after graduation.

 

There are those who believe the debt is not justified in any way and is a waste of money.

 

I'm impressed the child ignored the nay-sayers (not smart enough, not talented enough, etc) and was accepted. But the reality of the cost...OMG.


 

If he/she got into MIT, he/she probably got into other good, more affordable, schools.

 

The "child" is an adult.  He/she is fortunate enough to have enough tuition put aside for a state school.  Go there, graduate top of the class, and have your employer cover your grad degree.  

 

If he/she wants to take out loans, I would not co-sign either.  (I would help with tuition to the extent that I could, but would not co-sign.)  If he/she decides to take on and will be approved on his own for the loans, that is his/her decision.

 

Parents still have their own expensives and have to save for planned or unexpected retirement.   Frequently, those incomes which factor against financial aide go away when the parents can no longer work.

 

I know a grandmother at age 70 who is still working to pay for her granddauther's student loans. 

 

Do the math.