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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

Two immensely influential events occurred on March 20:

 

Albert Einstein introduced his theory of relativity, 1916.

 

Am not exactly a science person, but even I know how much this re-ordered the world.  Has to be one of the seminal events of history.

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe published "Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1852.

 

This is more up my alley.  Don't you love the fact that something existed and grew only  in her imagination, but was made tangible on the page, and helped change minds leading to the abolition of slavery?  Of course many other elements and people played a part, but "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was universally recognized as a powerful, change-making impetus.

 

Vaguely remember President Lincoln paid respectful tribute to that, remarking to her, only half jokingly, upon meeting,  "So you're the little lady who started the big War?"   (Not sure if I've got the quote exactly right, please correct if you know it.)

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a fascinatingly complex person.

 

 

 

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,982
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

And the day isn't over yet.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

For those interested, I did find a nicely abridged discussion for "non-scientists" of the range of Einstein's achievement in developing his theory:

 

http://www.livescience.com/58245-theory-of-relativity-in-real-life.html

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,880
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

[ Edited ]

 

Not a historian or scientist, but:

 

First day of spring/free small ice cream cone at DQ, also couldn't be a more beautiful weather day here. And I physically(within my capabilities) and mentally could not feel better. I hope many others here are feeling better also.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)

 

 

 

 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

[ Edited ]

And here's one of the better pocket biographies of Harriet Beecher Stowe; in addition to her ground-breaking activism, it alludes to the other accomplishments of her remarkable family...

 

http://www.historynet.com/harriet-beecher-stowe

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

[ Edited ]

Yes, hckynut(john), thanks for mentioning it is the first day of spring, too! Nice to get the Dairy Queen tip!  Glad you are feeling so well!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 23,575
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!


Oznell wrote:

Two immensely influential events occurred on March 20:

 

Albert Einstein introduced his theory of relativity, 1916.

 

Am not exactly a science person, but even I know how much this re-ordered the world.  Has to be one of the seminal events of history.

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe published "Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1852.

 

This is more up my alley.  Don't you love the fact that something existed and grew only  in her imagination, but was made tangible on the page, and helped change minds leading to the abolition of slavery?  Of course many other elements and people played a part, but "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was universally recognized as a powerful, change-making impetus.

 

Vaguely remember President Lincoln paid respectful tribute to that, remarking to her, only half jokingly, upon meeting,  "So you're the little lady who started the big War?"   (Not sure if I've got the quote exactly right, please correct if you know it.)

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a fascinatingly complex person.

 

 

 

 

 


@Oznell

 

Obviously, I know virtually nothing about the publishing industry back in the 1850's, but it's surprising that someone actually published the book ... written by a black woman .....  and on such a provocative subject for that era!   My guess is that this unknown publisher really took a chance on this book .... JMO

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,610
Registered: ‎08-19-2010

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

90 here already !

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,884
Registered: ‎05-23-2011

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!


Tinkrbl44 wrote:

Oznell wrote:

Two immensely influential events occurred on March 20:

 

Albert Einstein introduced his theory of relativity, 1916.

 

Am not exactly a science person, but even I know how much this re-ordered the world.  Has to be one of the seminal events of history.

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe published "Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1852.

 

This is more up my alley.  Don't you love the fact that something existed and grew only  in her imagination, but was made tangible on the page, and helped change minds leading to the abolition of slavery?  Of course many other elements and people played a part, but "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was universally recognized as a powerful, change-making impetus.

 

Vaguely remember President Lincoln paid respectful tribute to that, remarking to her, only half jokingly, upon meeting,  "So you're the little lady who started the big War?"   (Not sure if I've got the quote exactly right, please correct if you know it.)

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a fascinatingly complex person.

 

 

 

 

 


@Oznell

 

Obviously, I know virtually nothing about the publishing industry back in the 1850's, but it's surprising that someone actually published the book ... written by a black woman .....  and on such a provocative subject for that era!   My guess is that this unknown publisher really took a chance on this book .... JMO

 

The author wasn't a Black woman but from an abolitionist family in Connecticut @Tinkrbl44. But still an amazing book for it's time.


 

As you waste your breath complaining about life, someone out there is breathing their last. Appreciate what you have. Be thankful and stop complaining. Live more, complain less. Have more smiles, less stress.
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: Wow, March 20 A Very Combustible Day!

Yes, although plenty of famous abolitionists were Black, Harriet Beecher Stowe wasn't.  She has quite an interesting history with plenty of activists and also concerned clergymen in her family.  I think both her brother and her husband were well-known ministers?  The other things I remember is that she was physically tiny, mentally brilliant, and had an unusually large number of children....   She was a typical intellectual nineteenth century over-achiever!

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