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Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎09-21-2011

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

I had the check out guy ramble on forever about the video games he played and how he was so into them? I guess he was lonely , so I just listened and nodded. I couldn't wait to leave!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

At Publix it is the store policy for the baggers to offer everyone help to take the order to the car. I'm sure Publix isn't the only store that does so. What makes me SMH is when you see some 20 year old getting help to the car while the 90 year olds will take care of themselves. Speaks a lot to todays youth. Or the customer being assisted to the car is a 20 year old guy and the poor bagger struggling to help is some poor 70 year old lady. I've already gone to help an senior bagger to push the cart over the curb while the young customer just walks on ahead oblivious.

Super Contributor
Posts: 275
Registered: ‎08-31-2014

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

The heart is a lonely hunter.

 

Jmho but I let people talk.  I must have an understanding face or manner, whatever, but I do have a certain capacity for listening.

 

Of course, there are times when I want to get in and out quickly, move on, etc.  I can understand people getting PO'd over time-vampires.

 

But people are  often lonely and isolated, needing contact, you know?  If I can help, I do it. Believe me,  I'm no saint, just human. Smiley Happy

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,954
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker


@scotnovel wrote:

@terrier3 wrote:

That might have been the only human interaction the woman had that day...or maybe even that week!

I would cut her some slack.


Sorry but not having much human interaction is not a reason to be rude.  I live alone and the only human interaction I had today was checking out at the grocery store.  I just was cognizant that there were others in line behind me and so was not going to hold everything up so I could tell a complete stranger my problems.  


Then consider yourself lucky that you have all your wits about you, can realize when you are aggravating other people and you have better ways to interact other than with strangers .

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,596
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

[ Edited ]

@terrier3 wrote:

@scotnovel wrote:

@terrier3 wrote:

That might have been the only human interaction the woman had that day...or maybe even that week!

I would cut her some slack.


Sorry but not having much human interaction is not a reason to be rude.  I live alone and the only human interaction I had today was checking out at the grocery store.  I just was cognizant that there were others in line behind me and so was not going to hold everything up so I could tell a complete stranger my problems.  


Then consider yourself lucky that you have all your wits about you, can realize when you are aggravating other people and you have better ways to interact other than with strangers .


I've worked in sales for decades.  People tell you lots of things when you interact with them.  Some you are glad to know, some you are not. either way listening doesn't hurt anyone. In some area's of the country, deep south this is a common occurrance.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,287
Registered: ‎01-24-2013

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

Some people can pour their hearts out with friends or family, some with complete strangers they meet and some people pour their hearts out here. They just want someone to listen.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 34,809
Registered: ‎06-11-2011

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker


@qbetzforreal wrote:

Last week, a friend and I were in Sam's Club.  The storewas busy and what few checkout lanes which open were super long.  We got the chatty cashier.  My friend was chatting with her.  When she got to me, she still wanted to chat and I just wanted out.  I had tell my friend to quit engaging her because it was making her go slower and she needed to concentrate on her job of scanning.  Needless to say when I got home, I discovered that she had charged me twice for a very expensive item.


@qbetzforreal  I suggest you take your receipt back to that store's manager and tell him or her what you posted here.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,454
Registered: ‎01-13-2013

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker


@xrayrox wrote:

I had the check out guy ramble on forever about the video games he played and how he was so into them? I guess he was lonely , so I just listened and nodded. I couldn't wait to leave!


Oh that is so sad.

I usually just listen if someone seems desperate to talk.

 

My late father-in-law - bless his heart, OMG what a sweet man - he was so lonely he would sit outside next to the road on a stump.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,949
Registered: ‎10-04-2010

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

That reminds me of a time when I worked in an office of a realty company. I remember the maintenance men coming in and telling about some of these older people who would pull up a chair and watch and talk to those guys, because they either had no family who got to visit much or many friends left. That was sad. The other one, was when one guy realized that this little woman called the time over and over again just to hear another human voice. Some people are just lonely. Angels unaware.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,954
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Vent - the checkout clerk is not your psychologist or social worker

Years ago I lived in a large apartment building. Below me lived a VERY elderly husband and wife from Russia. They dressed up every day, even in the heat of summer, and he took her out for a "walk." She had arthritis and was told to walk daily.

Then they sat in the courtyard and waited to say hello to everyone who went by.

It turned out that they were Russian Jews - she was a physician and he was an engineer. They both spent time in work camps and managed to make it finally to America.

He spoke better English than she did...but neither spoke all that well. They loved opera (I don't) and loaned me opera videos. Then I would go to their place and they would discuss them with me. It often was "tedious", but I knew that both I and my son brought them joy and helped alleviate their loneliness a little. I felt it was a valuable learning lesson for my son. They had interesting stories about Russia and all they had lived through and survived. We culd have just as easily walked by...but they enriched US in the long run!