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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

I won the schlorship from my grandfather's company. It was a schlorship though and it paid my tuition.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

[ Edited ]

@151949 wrote:

I won the schlorship from my grandfather's company. It was a schlorship though and it paid my tuition.


That wasn't really a scholarship.

 

Someone else just paid your tuition.

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Posts: 3,306
Registered: ‎10-01-2011

Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@software wrote:

Maybe people will now be more encouraged to learn a trade.

Some college degrees are over-rated.

 

 


College is never a waste and college degrees are never over-rated.  Not everyone goes to college for job training, it's to expand the mind, learn critical thinking skills and how to analyze.  It bolsters intelligence, and learning in areas like history, literature and math.

 

And that's why so many jobs that aren't all that difficult require a college degree anyway.


That's great if you are independantly wealthy. Sure - get that degree in liberal arts and live on Daddy's money but here in the real world where college is paid for by loans that have to be repaid and where people  HAVE TO work for a bed to sleep in & a meal on the table - being tens of thousands of dollars in debt - having a USELESS degree without a career tract - and your only prospect for a job is collecting trash or Starbucks is just NOT REALISTIC.


Your premise is flawed.  

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@Bella Carro wrote:

@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@software wrote:

Maybe people will now be more encouraged to learn a trade.

Some college degrees are over-rated.

 

 


College is never a waste and college degrees are never over-rated.  Not everyone goes to college for job training, it's to expand the mind, learn critical thinking skills and how to analyze.  It bolsters intelligence, and learning in areas like history, literature and math.

 

And that's why so many jobs that aren't all that difficult require a college degree anyway.


That's great if you are independantly wealthy. Sure - get that degree in liberal arts and live on Daddy's money but here in the real world where college is paid for by loans that have to be repaid and where people  HAVE TO work for a bed to sleep in & a meal on the table - being tens of thousands of dollars in debt - having a USELESS degree without a career tract - and your only prospect for a job is collecting trash or Starbucks is just NOT REALISTIC.


Your premise is flawed.  


Very flawed my dd's degree is a liberal arts degree and she is not living on daddy's money. Daddy is dead and never paid for anything concerning her education. That 225,000 expense was received via a full scholarship and hard work on her part. Now at the ripe old age of 27 she is head of her banks IT Securities and Fraud Division with a staff underneath her.She and her fiance have bought a house and pay their own way. Oh and if for some reason someone had to get a job collecting garbage or working at Starbucks then G-d bless them. They are being productive and working. Nothing to be ashamed of. My daughter has been working since she was 9 in our family's business. And her fiance was doing the same in his family's restaurant business. Every job is important and should never be looked down on. 

 

 

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Registered: ‎10-01-2011

Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@151949 wrote:

I won the schlorship from my grandfather's company. It was a schlorship though and it paid my tuition.


You "won" a scholarship from a company your grandfather owned?  

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The point is that a kid is better off to learn a trade - not have the terrible debts - if they are not seeking a degree that puts them on a career path. For instance - a kid really doesn't have any idea what he wants to do in his life. He starts college , has no career path in mind so he is going to do what they all do in that circumstance and take the easiest route to a degree he can. He gets a degree - probably with mediocre grades , can't find a job and ends up no better off than a kid with no degree. OR he can go to community college - much much lower debt - they really steer the kids into a career path - finish up in a trade school and with much lower debt have an AD and a certificate in some specific trade where he can make a living and support himself. OR maybe skip college altogether and get into an apprenticship with a union or something.No debt and able to work and support himself and a family. So what's better - a degree and no job/mediocre job plus huge debt or a trade with a job sufficient to support himself and his family forever ?


@151949

 

You have nothing but fictional scenarios. I have no idea why you are so dead set against college, angry in fact, of course trade schools are perfect for many young people, no one is arguing that.


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


My DD will be a freshman this fall at a very fine liberal arts college.  Her major?  Oh, horrors - undecided.  Thank goodness for that.  She is 18 for heaven's sake.  Much too young to know her "career goals".  She is going to broaden her outlook, gain knowledge, discover her options in the world.  I also will encourage her to study abroad with or without a declared major or "career goal".  She has a fully funded 529 due to our commitment to financially plan for her education.  Once that is depleted (although I expect she'll have a bit left) she will be responsible for funding her education.  So, no need to worry about her debt.