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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@itiswhatitis wrote:

@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The point is that a kid is better off to learn a trade - not have the terrible debts - if they are not seeking a degree that puts them on a career path. For instance - a kid really doesn't have any idea what he wants to do in his life. He starts college , has no career path in mind so he is going to do what they all do in that circumstance and take the easiest route to a degree he can. He gets a degree - probably with mediocre grades , can't find a job and ends up no better off than a kid with no degree. OR he can go to community college - much much lower debt - they really steer the kids into a career path - finish up in a trade school and with much lower debt have an AD and a certificate in some specific trade where he can make a living and support himself. OR maybe skip college altogether and get into an apprenticship with a union or something.No debt and able to work and support himself and a family. So what's better - a degree and no job/mediocre job plus huge debt or a trade with a job sufficient to support himself and his family forever ?


@151949

 

You have nothing but fictional scenarios. I have no idea why you are so dead set against college, angry in fact, of course trade schools are perfect for many young people, no one is arguing that.


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


It doesn't leave EVERYONE WITH HORRIBLE DEBT.  But let's just say it does leave them with debt....what's to YOU @151949?  You don't have to make those payments.

 

How did you become a nurse?  Did you have debt?


No I had a schlorship and I worked to pay my expenses not covered by that. I graduated with only $1400 on my school loan. However, times have radically changed.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The point is that a kid is better off to learn a trade - not have the terrible debts - if they are not seeking a degree that puts them on a career path. For instance - a kid really doesn't have any idea what he wants to do in his life. He starts college , has no career path in mind so he is going to do what they all do in that circumstance and take the easiest route to a degree he can. He gets a degree - probably with mediocre grades , can't find a job and ends up no better off than a kid with no degree. OR he can go to community college - much much lower debt - they really steer the kids into a career path - finish up in a trade school and with much lower debt have an AD and a certificate in some specific trade where he can make a living and support himself. OR maybe skip college altogether and get into an apprenticship with a union or something.No debt and able to work and support himself and a family. So what's better - a degree and no job/mediocre job plus huge debt or a trade with a job sufficient to support himself and his family forever ?


@151949

 

You have nothing but fictional scenarios. I have no idea why you are so dead set against college, angry in fact, of course trade schools are perfect for many young people, no one is arguing that.


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


 

🙄

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

My nephew graduated from college out west two years ago with a business degree. He decided to stay out there and get a job. He got a job with a company that required a degree. He has an apartment with two friends. 

 

He has no college debt as his parents planned that very early in their marriage. My nephew is grateful for that. He likes his job and is happy out there and earning a decent living at this point. He chose what what type of career he wanted in life.

 

my husbands three nieces are in their twenties and early thirties. All graduated from college and each makes more money in one year than I ever made in one year in my whole career. 

 

So college works for some and not others.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education




@151949 wrote:





@151949

 

 


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


 

 


Isn't that a rapper?

 

Oh wait that's Ludacris.

 

Carry on.  ROTFL!

""But tell me where do the children play"-Cat Stevens
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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

[ Edited ]

@151949 wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The point is that a kid is better off to learn a trade - not have the terrible debts - if they are not seeking a degree that puts them on a career path. For instance - a kid really doesn't have any idea what he wants to do in his life. He starts college , has no career path in mind so he is going to do what they all do in that circumstance and take the easiest route to a degree he can. He gets a degree - probably with mediocre grades , can't find a job and ends up no better off than a kid with no degree. OR he can go to community college - much much lower debt - they really steer the kids into a career path - finish up in a trade school and with much lower debt have an AD and a certificate in some specific trade where he can make a living and support himself. OR maybe skip college altogether and get into an apprenticship with a union or something.No debt and able to work and support himself and a family. So what's better - a degree and no job/mediocre job plus huge debt or a trade with a job sufficient to support himself and his family forever ?


@151949

 

You have nothing but fictional scenarios. I have no idea why you are so dead set against college, angry in fact, of course trade schools are perfect for many young people, no one is arguing that.


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


It doesn't leave EVERYONE WITH HORRIBLE DEBT.  But let's just say it does leave them with debt....what's to YOU @151949?  You don't have to make those payments.

 

How did you become a nurse?  Did you have debt?


No I had a schlorship and I worked to pay my expenses not covered by that. I graduated with only $1400 on my school loan. However, times have radically changed.


@151949

 

As I recall, you went for a two year degree in nursing, which was common at that time.  

 

Right, you can't get a four year degree on $1400.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

[ Edited ]

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@151949 wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The point is that a kid is better off to learn a trade - not have the terrible debts - if they are not seeking a degree that puts them on a career path. For instance - a kid really doesn't have any idea what he wants to do in his life. He starts college , has no career path in mind so he is going to do what they all do in that circumstance and take the easiest route to a degree he can. He gets a degree - probably with mediocre grades , can't find a job and ends up no better off than a kid with no degree. OR he can go to community college - much much lower debt - they really steer the kids into a career path - finish up in a trade school and with much lower debt have an AD and a certificate in some specific trade where he can make a living and support himself. OR maybe skip college altogether and get into an apprenticship with a union or something.No debt and able to work and support himself and a family. So what's better - a degree and no job/mediocre job plus huge debt or a trade with a job sufficient to support himself and his family forever ?


@151949

 

You have nothing but fictional scenarios. I have no idea why you are so dead set against college, angry in fact, of course trade schools are perfect for many young people, no one is arguing that.


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


It doesn't leave EVERYONE WITH HORRIBLE DEBT.  But let's just say it does leave them with debt....what's to YOU @151949?  You don't have to make those payments.

 

How did you become a nurse?  Did you have debt?


No I had a schlorship and I worked to pay my expenses not covered by that. I graduated with only $1400 on my school loan. However, times have radically changed.


@151949

 

As I recall, you went for a two year degree in nursing, which was common at that time.  

 

Right, you can't get a four year degree on $1400.


I went to a 3 year(36 months year round- no summer off) nursing school then got my BSN - paid for by the hospital where I worked - later.I only needed 24 more credits. As for WHY my loan was only $1400, which I paid off with graduation gift money - as I stated I both had a schlorship AND I WORKED  throughout nursing school.I also have my CCRN and my ANA certifications. I am extremely proud of my career and what I achieved.

It never ceases to amaze me how people here try to warp what a poster clearly says to make it suit them.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@Cakers3 wrote:



@151949 wrote:





@151949

 

 


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


 

 


Isn't that a rapper?

 

Oh wait that's Ludacris.

 

Carry on.  ROTFL!


NASTY and not necessary and mean.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,752
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@151949 wrote:

@Cakers3 wrote:



@151949 wrote:





@151949

 

 


WHY? because a college education in todays world leaves a kid with HORRIBLE DEBT.And if they don't have a professional level career with the income it brings - how do they pay that off? I'm not against college if the kid is seeking a career that needs a college degree - law - medicine - architect - teacher etc. But to put a kid with no career goals into college to just flounder around getting a degree, but not in a field that will produce an income and racking up huge debt is ludicrist.


 

 


Isn't that a rapper?

 

Oh wait that's Ludacris.

 

Carry on.  ROTFL!


NASTY and not necessary and mean.

 

 


That wasn't nasty or mean, it was hilarious.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education


@itiswhatitis wrote:

@151949 wrote:

So how does the person who gets a degree as a museum curator or in art history, communication or philosophy make a living in the real world?

These are all degrees that some of my friend's kids have degrees in.  In actual fact - the museum curator works at Walmart, art history is a SAHM - communication, actually has a masters degree - works in a grocery store at the deli counter and he is 35 years old. This is the only job he's ever had. Philosophy doesn't work at all and lives off his widowed Mother. 

You can go on & on & on about your critical thinking etc. but I live in the real world.


Careers for Philosophy Majors

 

Many of our philosophy alumni have gone on to a career in law. The ability to think and write clearly, to analyze and present arguments, is highly valued in the law profession. Philosophy majors have one of the highest rates of acceptance at law schools. Taking some philosophy courses that have a natural tie-in with law (philosophy of law, ethics, political philosophy) may be helpful but are not necessary.

 

For testimony from Catherine Holzle, a Senior Attorney with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, about how her study of philosophy at Maryland has helped her in her career, click here

 

For testimony from attorney Jason Weinstock about how his study of philosophy at Maryland has helped him in his law career, click 

 

Careers in the Health Professions

 

Maryland philosophy alumni are well-represented in the medical profession, both as practitioners and as administrators. Traditionally, medical schools look favorably upon candidates with a liberal arts degree, especially from philosophy departments. And the career paths taken by Maryland graduates are varied: psychiatry, ophthalmology, orthopedics, dentistry, neurology, cancer research. Many of our graduates have gone into health administration.

 

For testimony from Yvonne de Buy, associate director of management at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, about how study of philosophy at Maryland has helped her in her medical career, click

 

Careers in Local, State, and Federal Government

 

Maryland philosophy alumni have gone to a variety of positions in various government agencies, such as the Department of Transportation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions, the Environmental Protections Agency, the Goddard Space Center, etc. The university’s location near Washington, DC, provides possibilities for government internships and later jobs.

 

Careers in Business

 

Business and philosophy seem at first glance to be poles apart, but, in fact, many successful people in business and industry started out as philosophy majors. Recent Maryland philosophy alumni have become stockbrokers, venture capitalists, marketing specialists, managers, editors, publishing industry executives, real-estate brokers.

Let’s face it: when you go to a job interview with a company, and you let them know that you are a philosophy major, your personal stock goes up. It shows that you are intrigued by difficult and fundamental problems, that your interests are broad, that you have a good head, and that you express yourself well. There is an aura about “philosophy” that often gives candidates a competitive edge in interview situations.

For testimony from real estate broker Adiatu Khanu, about how her philosophy degree at Maryland has helped her in her career, click here

 

Careers in Information Technology

 

Liberal arts graduates are now going into Information Technology in droves. The connection between philosophy and computers is obvious for anybody who had study logic, not to mention cognitive science. The interdisciplinary nature of the philosophy department at Maryland is an ideal training-ground for alumni going into professions where there are computer applications, such as business, industry, education, etc.

For testimony from David Kreisberg, a Technology Instructional Specialist for the Montgomery County Public Schools, about how his philosophy degree at Maryland has helped him in his career, click here.

 

Careers in Science

 

No other degree in the humanities produces as many scientists as philosophy. That may be because some students major in philosophy and in science as well. But it also helps that the department teaches philosophy of biology, philosophy of physics, and cognitive scientists.

For the testimony of Mark Lupisella, an astrobiologist at the NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, about how his study of philosophy at Maryland pointed him in the right direction, click here.

 

For the testimony of Doug Powell, a statistician at the National Cancer Institute, about how his philosophy degree of Maryland has helped him, click here.

 

Other Careers

 

From our survey of career paths taken by our majors, we found that Maryland Philosophy alumni are working in a variety of areas, including foreign service, clergy, non-governmental organizations, teaching, academia, university administration. But we also found that many of them have taken several paths and have managed to combine their interests. The really fortunate ones have been able to combine their knowledge and love of philosophy with whatever else they are doing.

For the testimony of Deirdre Golash, who combines law with her background in philosophy as a teacher at American University, click here.

 

@151949


EVERY ONE OF THESE REQUIRES A MASTERS DEGREE OR MORE.

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Re: Three Worrisome Trends in U.S. Higher Education

Advanced education is a wonderful thing.  I have a Masters and although I am retired, I am still taking college level courses and I read constantly.

 

Having said that, it's a very expensive proposition these days - much more so than when I put myself through.  If it leaves the student in significant debt, it would make sense to pursue a degree that would land a job lucrative enough to pay it off.

 

I, too, love the idea of taking 4 - or more - years to find yourself while pursuing subjects that interest you.  However, the reality is that no one then owes you a job at the end - so as much fun as it might be to become a philosopher or an artist, it's a good idea to have a plan b.  After all no one is stopping you from pursuing your interest in philosophy or art once you have a job.  Learning is life long - or should be.