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Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter

In 1611, an Englishman by the name of Thomas Coryat observed the polite use of forks by the Italians while dining in Italy.  He decided to bring the practice back to England.

 

He was ridiculed for being "effeminate" and putting on airs for using forks.

 

In 1630, Governor Winthrop of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, is said to have possessed the only fork in America.  He is credited with introducing the "fad" here.

 

I love facts like this.

 

In the past in some places, knives were used in the way that forks are now.  I wonder if that accounts for this little poem?

 

I eat my peas with honey.

I've done it all my life.

It does taste kind of funny,

But it keeps them on the knife.

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter

I love to read facts like this too.

 

When I was in China, I learned that knives were considered savage and not allowed on the table.  That is why all food is cut into bite size pieces in the kitchen before it is served.  The Chinese use spoons and chop sticks at the table. ( they also have forks for westerners)

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter

@CARMIE  Interesting.  This might sound strange, but I prefer chopsticks.  I like the feel of the chopstick as opposed to metal.  At home or in Thai/Chinese restaurants, I am so comfortable using chopsticks.  (Interesting that the Chinese consider knives savage and yet they host the Yulin Dog Festival...)

 


@CARMIE wrote:

I love to read facts like this too.

 

When I was in China, I learned that knives were considered savage and not allowed on the table.  That is why all food is cut into bite size pieces in the kitchen before it is served.  The Chinese use spoons and chop sticks at the table. ( they also have forks for westerners)


 

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter


@phoenixbrd wrote:

@CARMIE  Interesting.  This might sound strange, but I prefer chopsticks.  I like the feel of the chopstick as opposed to metal.  At home or in Thai/Chinese restaurants, I am so comfortable using chopsticks.  (Interesting that the Chinese consider knives savage and yet they host the Yulin Dog Festival...)

 


@CARMIE wrote:

I love to read facts like this too.

 

When I was in China, I learned that knives were considered savage and not allowed on the table.  That is why all food is cut into bite size pieces in the kitchen before it is served.  The Chinese use spoons and chop sticks at the table. ( they also have forks for westerners)


 


It's a culture difference.  Dogs have always been a source of food for them.  The only pet dogs I saw when I was there were white small dogs with long hair.  There weren't many, but they were all looked to be the same breed. They eat insects and rodents and snakes too. 

 

Most of us eat cattle, but some people won't eat cattle for religious reasons and some don't eat pigs for the same reason. What is wrong to some is accepted by others.

 

 

 

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter

I grew up with using only a fork.

 

Do any of you use the knife/fork protocol?

The upside down fork in one hand, cutting w/ a knife.

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter

[ Edited ]

@CARMIE  Unfortunately there is more to it than just a cultural difference and, yes, I don't support our meat/dairy industry either.  During the Yulin Dog Festival the thousands of dogs that have been rounded/stolen up are viciously beaten to death, nailed to walls, have their limbs sawed off, and dipped in boiling oil all while still alive because it is believed that the flavor of the  dog is tastier if it is tortured before death.  I doubt any humane person will accept these heinous acts as simply a cultural difference.  Every year petitions are signed in the US to stop these practices.  I understand that most likely you weren't aware of these facts.  Paul McCartney made a movie "Glass Walls" (as well as many others) that illustrates our ignorance of what really happens behind closed doors with animals who are unable to defend themselves.  If you research Yulin Dog "Festival", I doubt you will be able to accept these practices as simply a cultural difference.  I practice peace for all sentient beings.  Sometimes the truth brings tears to my eyes.

 


 

 

 

 

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter


@phoenixbrd wrote:

@CARMIE  Unfortunately there is more to it than just a cultural difference and, yes, I don't support our meat/dairy industry either.  During the Yulin Dog Festival the thousands of dogs that have been rounded/stolen up are viciously beaten to death, nailed to walls, have their limbs sawed off, and dipped in boiling oil all while still alive because it is believed that the flavor of the  dog is tastier if it is tortured before death.  I doubt any humane person will accept these heinous acts as simply a cultural difference.  Every year petitions are signed in the US to stop these practices.  I understand that most likely you weren't aware of these facts.  Paul McCartney made a movie "Glass Walls" (as well as many others) that illustrates our ignorance of what really happens behind closed doors with animals who are unable to defend themselves.  If you research Yulin Dog "Festival", I doubt you will be able to accept these practices as simply a cultural difference.  I practice peace for all sentient beings.  Sometimes the truth brings tears to my eyes.


ThankYou @phoenixbrd for writing this truth.

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter


@phoenixbrd wrote:

@CARMIE  Unfortunately there is more to it than just a cultural difference and, yes, I don't support our meat/dairy industry either.  During the Yulin Dog Festival the thousands of dogs that have been rounded/stolen up are viciously beaten to death, nailed to walls, have their limbs sawed off, and dipped in boiling oil all while still alive because it is believed that the flavor of the  dog is tastier if it is tortured before death.  I doubt any humane person will accept these heinous acts as simply a cultural difference.  Every year petitions are signed in the US to stop these practices.  I understand that most likely you weren't aware of these facts.  Paul McCartney made a movie "Glass Walls" (as well as many others) that illustrates our ignorance of what really happens behind closed doors with animals who are unable to defend themselves.  If you research Yulin Dog "Festival", I doubt you will be able to accept these practices as simplyt thing hangout it al ata cultural difference.  I practice peace for all sentient beings.  Sometimes the truth brings tears to my eyes.


I know all about the festival and dont support it at all.  This festival only began in 2009, while the eating of dogs has been done for centuries,

 

Outrage by people around the world have caused this festival to be cancelled.  I hope and pray it will close down altogether,  Until the Chinese government gets involved, it Unfortunally will continue behind closed doors,

 

Their Government is not known for their humane practices of people either,

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter


@sidsmom wrote:

I grew up with using only a fork.

 

Do any of you use the knife/fork protocol?

The upside down fork in one hand, cutting w/ a knife.


Yes, I use this method.  It seems so ackward to keep switching hands and laying down the knife while eating.

 

 You can always spot the Americans in any restaurant anywhere in the world.

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Re: Think of This the Next Time You Spear a Sausage Off the Platter


@CARMIE wrote:

I love to read facts like this too.

 

When I was in China, I learned that knives were considered savage and not allowed on the table.  That is why all food is cut into bite size pieces in the kitchen before it is served.  The Chinese use spoons and chop sticks at the table. ( they also have forks for westerners)


I totally get that. I was raised eating Japanese food my mother cooked. To this day I hardly ever use a knife, except when I prepare food for cooking. Chops sticks and spoons for me always but I do keep forks on hand when company comes.Woman Happy