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Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎01-19-2015

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I often watch HGTV. Many of the programs are filmed in Canada. I think some of the Canadian word pronunciations are cute. House is "hoose." Out is "oot." About is "aboot."... Process is "prohcess." Problem is "prohblem."... And they say "eh?" instead of "huh?"
~~Be careful when you follow the masses. Sometimes the 'm' is silent.~~
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

One thing I know is that if you say "barbed wire" instead of "bob war" you ain't no cowboy. 

 

I see "advice" and "advise" used wrong all the time here, and I wonder if people simply are spelling it incorrectly or if they pronounce it that way as well. 

 

"I need advise. . . "

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Posts: 6,287
Registered: ‎01-24-2013

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@MaggieMack wrote:
I always notice when national broadcasters pronounce the capital of South Dakota as if it were some French name. Yes, it is spelled Pierre, but should be pronounced Pier, like on the waterfront. You would think they would know better.

################################

 

 

 

I never knew that !

 

 

Thanks, MaggieMack !

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Posts: 1,312
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I have many peeves, some of them already mentioned.  But the one that bothers me the most right now, as I hear it a lot in the summer, is asphalt.  

 

Asphalt, not ash-phalt.

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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@chickenbutt wrote:

@mstyrion 1 wrote:

"boo koo" for beaucoup.

"jewlery" for jewelry

garNET for GARnet

 

 

 

 


There used to be a show host on CVN who moved to Value Vision. Her name was Kendy Crowley. She called the stones "gar-NETS." I wanted to call her and tell her she should learn how to pronounce what she's selling.  

 

I also can't stand "Wallah," instead of voila (vwa-LA). 

 

Coming from Brooklyn and Long Island, I'm sure there are many people who hate how I pronounce things, such as "cawfee."  Hey, it's how we roll.

 

 


 

Do not think your single vote does not matter much. The rain that refreshes the parched ground is made up of single drops.

~~Kate Sheppard

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Registered: ‎06-27-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I have an issue with people who don't say "Quart."  There used to be an ice cream parlor in my home town.  I would go there regularly and ask for a quart of a particular flavor.  Without fail, the girl working there would would look at me and say "A court?"  

 

Also people who say Artesian instead of Artesan, and people who don't know the difference between Quiet and Quite.

"It doesn't matter if the glass is half-full or half-empty as long as you still have the rest of the bottle."
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I want to add that posts like this rarely end well, so be careful! 

 

People are very protective of their regional accents. 

 

Don't say I didn't warn you Man Very Happy

Do not think your single vote does not matter much. The rain that refreshes the parched ground is made up of single drops.

~~Kate Sheppard

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Registered: ‎01-06-2013

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

[ Edited ]

I am loving this one, kids!  This is entertaining AND educational.  (I think I'm so smart....then I learn something new:  Thanks, South Dakotans (??) for teaching me "pier" instead of the Frenchman!)  Although I hear numerous mispronunciations regularly, the two that bother me the most have already been mentioned:  nuke-YOU-ler and wah-LAH   We've had presidents say the first one, and shopping hosts use the second one.  (Fingernails on a chalkboard to me!!)

 

This one is popular in my area:  "We didn't want FiFi to have puppies, so we had her SPADED."

NONONONONONO!!!!!

 

P.S.  Minot?  

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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@Greenhouse wrote:
Well, I'm from NJ, need I say more?

This has nothing to do with pronunciation but just this morning I made a comment about people leaving the New off of New Jersey.

Drives me nuts.  

No one leaves it off NY, NH or NM

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Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@chickenbutt wrote:

I know that I might be rather persnickity about such things, so I accept that.

 

But here's the thing - There are some words that when some people say them it makes me cringe and want to shove a pencil through my head.

 

I was watching a food show yesterday (on either FN or Cooking Channel) and there were 'pecans' happening in the course of whatever was being cooked.

 

The chefs both must have said 'PEEEEE-cans' fifty times until I almost went insane.    Clearly, in my estimation, it is NOT 'PEE-can'.   It's 'peh-CAHN' (accent on second syllable as illustrated by caps).

 

Are there any alternate pronunciations that make others just cringe?  Or am I just way too persnickity and I need to stop it?  Smiley Happy


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Two that have always bothered me:

 

Most "importantly," instead of most "important."  Importantly is an active adverb (e.g., he walked into the room importantly).  Important denotes a subject in a sentence (e.g., most important, don't forget to pack your underwear, the subject being "underwear.")  However, importantly used at the beginning of a sentence is used most often these days even when it describes nothing, and that is relatively new (the last few decades).  Just rearrange the words and it becomes obvious.  If one said, "It is importantly to pack your underwear," it is easy to see the error.

 

The other is the most widely used in all areas including media, as well as the medical community (I've seen professional signs using this word) is the word "preventative."  It is used in place of "preventive," and both mean the same thing, so why use the longer version?  Preventative is seen everywhere, on TV, on paper media, online, and used by doctors, nurses, etc. in their daily conversation.

 

It bothers me, but the usage of those words has been of such long duration that they have become acceptable and are now in dictionaries (although the "preferred" usages are always the shorter versions).

 

These are not mispronunciations, as in "aks" instead of "ask" (which also hurts my ears). 

 

"I seen it happen."  Also so wrong.  It's either "I have seen it happen," or "I saw it happen."

 

I could go on and on, Chickenbutt, you brought up one of my soapbox issues, LOL!!

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986