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Respected Contributor
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Well, I'm from NJ, need I say more?
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Magnolia - Your post reminded me of my husband who has this strange (to me) habit of putting the accent on the first syllable of a word instead of where it (sez me) should be.

 

For instance he will say MO-tel, or HO-tel, or RE-ceipt.  I've gotten better at not going crazy.  hehe Smiley Happy

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@Sweetbay magnolia wrote:

Real - a - tor, instead of real-tor.  Even realtors seem to say that.  I am with those, however, who appreciate regional dialects and pronunciations.  Say Nor-folk?  You're not from Naw-f#%k, VA.  Washington, DC?  The "natives" say Warshington (at least the ones I have known).  Neighbors from SW VA have a beautiful round enunciation with vowels and emphasis on syllables that I love to hear, and emulate.  I personally say "Ches (a) peake" rather than Chesapeake (pronounced short a).  It's almost like you take a breath over the "a" and get right to the "peake".  I lived in that region and we all knew what the reference was without elaborating the name.  Of course, it was usually just "the bay".

 

My Dad used to say "innahvative"  (innovative) with the accent on the "ah"), and a short "a" at the last syllable.  I thought it was a nice twist (very innovative, however you say it!).


Realtor is number 44 on the list I posted.  Here is what it says:

 

44. Realtor – The word has three syllables. Say /RE-AL-TOR/, not /re-a-la-tor/.

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. -- Oscar Wilde
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Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I had a hard time understanding a new friend from Maine.  She asked me if I wanted a

be a.   I said, be a what?  She said, you know, a be a.  She pointed to a can of beer.  Around here we drag that word out... beeeer. 

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Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

When you travel around, you find out a lot about different pronuciations. Some cities and towns are a case in point. Berlin, New Hampshire and Madrid, New York are not pronounced the same as the cities in Europe. For fun jst try Worcester, Mass. and Skaneateles NY. It's a wide world for sure. 

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Regional pronunciations.  I too say Pee Can and not Peh Cahn.  Around here it is the way it is said.  I see no problem either way.  In our area, perhaps local of course, it we wish to say we are going to a city to shop...we say DOWN THE ROAD.  When I first heard it, I though it was funny, now I am saying it.  Accents and dialects and word usage is learned by being around those who say  and use it.  Nothing bothers me.  

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

My pet peeve: people who say te instead of to. I am going te the store instead I am going to the store. Even our President does this.
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Re:  pronunciation of Peeeeecannnns and Missourah.

 

If you are the daughter of  Midwesterners (as I am) but married to a deep-South guy who grew up with two gorgeous huge pecan trees in his front yard, you say "pehcan".  But visits and part of my college career spent in the South, I know it is normal to hear about pee-cans.

 

If you were born in Missouri (as I was,, although I was not raised there) and if you graduated from the University of Missouri (as I did after attending the first several years of college in the South), you would know that "Mizzou--rah" is the cheer you hear at the school's sporting events.  It's normal to use it while cheering for the school, but not for daily speech in identifying the state, I guess.

 

It's always been just plain Missouri to me, but as a state university alumnus, I'm also sometimes caught calling the school by its nickname---Mizzou.

 

(And if anyone's checking, I'm not a new poster, despite what the supreme QVC Webmaster decided I had to become.  I got a notice last week that he obliterated my current valid email address and needed to find a new nickname for posting and log in using an email address that I haven't had for years.  Too hard to explain, and a purely arbitrary action on his part that has caused me to not only get a new nickname, but a new email address as well.  Unbelievable............)

 

 

 

 

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

[ Edited ]

@mstyrion 1 wrote:

"boo koo" for beaucoup.

"jewlery" for jewelry

garNET for GARnet

 

 

*********

 

Jewelery and Jewelry are BOTH correct.  In fact, in the UK it is always called/spelled jewelery.  The dropping of a syllable in the US is a rather revent convention, as when I was growing up in NY in the 50's, it was always pronounced jewelery.

 

My pet peeve is "wah la" instead of "voila"---drives me insane when I hear it in the US.

 

 

 


 

"More is more and less is a bore!" Iris Apfel
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

REALTOR, for those who care, is a trademarked name owned by the National Association of REALTORS and should always be fully capitalized.  Obviously, this "requirement" doesn't cut much ice out there in the real world. 

 

I was once a REALTOR.  Now I'm just a state-licensed real estate broker who doesn't work enough to justify paying NAR dues and MLS fees.  Just because someone has a state-issued real estate license (as a salesperson, associate broker or broker) does not mean he or she is a REALTOR.

 

And it's easy to find people in that very business who have no clue about all that I just said.