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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Fiscal year.  I knew a CFO that would pronounce it physical year. 

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@chickenbutt wrote:

@NoelSeven wrote:

@NoelSeven wrote:

CB ALERT!

 

Sherbet?  Is what you say, "sherbert"?  Because I can explain that one for you Smiley Happy


 CB replied!

 

Yeah (hanging head).   That's it.    Sitting here now, saying the word over and over, both ways, it still seems like it should sound like 'sherbert'. 

 

*************************************

 

CB, HANG YOUR HEAD NO LONGER!

 

It's regional, and it's because San Francisco had a place in the Marina called "Herbert's Sherbert."    It was famous!  Herb Caen wrote about it all the time, everyone went there, so consequently, everyone called it "sherbert."

 

It's still considered acceptable to call it "sherbert" in some places, I've even seen it online, but I doubt many people know why.

 

Herb was a friend of my father's, we were there all the time.  My father was not a big fan of ice cream but he loved Herb's "sherbert."  To this day, I do like pineapple sherbet/sherbert because that was my favorite from Herb.

 

Feel better?  Smiley Happy   See, I told you, all things regional Smiley Happy


 

Oh, awesome!  Smiley Happy   I remember Herb Caen very well.  I like sherbet too.  I probably go for raspberry or orange.  

 

Funny, I know the spelling but I always pronounced it 'sherbert'. 

 

For a while Haagen Dazs had a sorbet (yeah, kind of different, I know) that was lemon.  It was THE most amazing, silky, tart, lemony lemon flavor.  I loved it so much.  Consequently, it seems to have gone away - or at least from my Raley's.  It was in their '5 Ingredient' line.


Speaking of Haagen-Dazs, did you know it is a made-up name? Woman Surprised

 

Wikipedia:

 

Häagen-Dazs is an ice cream brand, established by Reuben and Rose Mattus in the Bronx, New York, in 1961.

 

Mattus invented the "Danish-sounding" "Häagen-Dazs" as a tribute to Denmark's exemplary treatment of its Jews during the Second World War, and included an outline map of Denmark on early labels. The name is not Danish, which has neither an umlaut nor a digraph zs, nor did the name have any meaning in any language before its creation. Mattus felt that Denmark was known for its dairy products and had a positive image in the United States. His daughter Doris Hurley reported in the 1999 PBS documentary An Ice Cream Show that her father sat at the kitchen table for hours saying nonsensical words until he came up with a combination he liked. The reason he chose this method was so that the name would be unique and original.

 

I love trivia!  Heart

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. -- Oscar Wilde
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

SG - I actually DID know that Haagen Dazs is a made up word, or words i guess.   Some years back I remember somebody being interviewed or something like that, and the person was asked what Haagen Dazs means.   They said it doesn't mean anything - the words were totally made up. 

 

I remember them saying something about how they wanted the word to sound and to be unique.  Pretty cool!  Smiley Happy

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

I watch a British soap called, Coronation Street. I heard them say AL Lew Min EE UM, and I had no idea what it was. I finally figured out it was aluminum. There are many words that  that say differntly than we do

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@Still Raining wrote:

On the long listing below under the Illinois entry they mention the correct way to say the state of Arkansas.  But you have to watch out because just south of Winfield, Kansas is Arkansas City, Kansas.  And yes you guessed it, you won't get directions to there by saying it like the state.

******************************************************************************


Yes you are correct about that. We natives to south central Kansas just call it Ark City, but the correct pronunciation is r-KAN-zas City, not like the state r-kan-SAW.

It's God's job to judge the terrorists. It's our mission to arrange the meeting. U.S. Marines
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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@chickenbutt wrote:

For a while Haagen Dazs had a sorbet (yeah, kind of different, I know) that was lemon.  It was THE most amazing, silky, tart, lemony lemon flavor.  I loved it so much.  Consequently, it seems to have gone away - or at least from my Raley's.  It was in their '5 Ingredient' line.


I loved the lemon from the 5 line.  HD lemon gelato is an adequate substitute.

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Born and raised in the west.  When I was in Little Rock AR one time, a lady said to me - Honey, ya'll got an accent.  I didn't think so.

Every region has their own accent, but the one that get me is when people put an H in a word that starts with an S.  For instance, shtreet instead of street, shtorm instead of storm, shtraight instead of straight.

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


lulu2 wrote:

chickenbutt wrote:

For a while Haagen Dazs had a sorbet (yeah, kind of different, I know) that was lemon.  It was THE most amazing, silky, tart, lemony lemon flavor.  I loved it so much.  Consequently, it seems to have gone away - or at least from my Raley's.  It was in their '5 Ingredient' line.


I loved the lemon from the 5 line.  HD lemon gelato is an adequate substitute.


 

Ooh, thanks!  I'm going to make note of that.  I wish that other one hadn't gone away.  It was indescribably delicious.  Seems like whatever it is that I like always goes away.  boo hoo (end of whine)   hehe

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced


@LyndaGee wrote:

Just the other day, was talking on the phone with somebody who pronounced the word "route" like "rout."  What the ??!!!


 

 Where they from Pittsburgh? We have our own vocabulary. Smiley Tongue

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Re: The different ways that words are pronounced

Real - a - tor, instead of real-tor.  Even realtors seem to say that.  I am with those, however, who appreciate regional dialects and pronunciations.  Say Nor-folk?  You're not from Naw-f#%k, VA.  Washington, DC?  The "natives" say Warshington (at least the ones I have known).  Neighbors from SW VA have a beautiful round enunciation with vowels and emphasis on syllables that I love to hear, and emulate.  I personally say "Ches (a) peake" rather than Chesapeake (pronounced short a).  It's almost like you take a breath over the "a" and get right to the "peake".  I lived in that region and we all knew what the reference was without elaborating the name.  Of course, it was usually just "the bay".

 

My Dad used to say "innahvative"  (innovative) with the accent on the "ah"), and a short "a" at the last syllable.  I thought it was a nice twist (very innovative, however you say it!).

Cogito ergo sum