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About the Orca that had carried her deceased child for so so long...has given birth!  Tahlequah  (J35 is the number of her pod) has successfully given birth to a new calf last night. Tahlequah is the orca who touched the hearts of millions around the world in 2018 when her calf died and she was seen pushing it for 17 days, refusing to let it go, in an unprecedented show of mourning.

 

 

Now comes the hard part.  The survival of the baby.  As predators, the mortality rate of infants are very high.  For the next month or two, Tahlequah will not eat or sleep.  She has to help her baby breath and swim.  Orcas are conscious breathers (as opposed to humans who are unconscious breathers)  They have to remember to breath air. She'll be monitored to make sure this time everything  will go alright. 

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Oh, that is wonderful!  I pray that her baby stays safe and will be allowed to grow and prosper and live a long and healthy life!  Mama deserves this, too! 

"A day without sunshine is like, you know, night." - Steve Martin
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Thanks for the update.  I really appreciate reading about J35.  I followed her when she swam with her deceased baby.  Such a touching story about how nature works.

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Re: Some good news

[ Edited ]

@Songbird1 wrote:

About the Orca that had carried her deceased child for so so long...has given birth!  Tahlequah  (J35 is the number of her pod) has successfully given birth to a new calf last night. Tahlequah is the orca who touched the hearts of millions around the world in 2018 when her calf died and she was seen pushing it for 17 days, refusing to let it go, in an unprecedented show of mourning.

 

 

Now comes the hard part.  The survival of the baby.  As predators, the mortality rate of infants are very high.  For the next month or two, Tahlequah will not eat or sleep.  She has to help her baby breath and swim.  Orcas are conscious breathers (as opposed to humans who are unconscious breathers)  They have to remember to breath air. She'll be monitored to make sure this time everything  will go alright. 


I will pray also..that her baby will survive!!!!! Tahlequah is an amazing mother! Heart

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@ceodih wrote:

Thanks for the update.  I really appreciate reading about J35.  I followed her when she swam with her deceased baby.  Such a touching story about how nature works.


Yes it is.  Nature is absolutely miraculous.  Man is his own worst enemy. 

 

Humankind can learn so much from the animal and plant-life kingdoms.  Such intelligence in EVERY earthly creation.

Flowers are nature's way of laughing
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Obviously, not only humans have feelings..........

 

Wishing her and baby well and safe.

 

And all of us, and all animals and nature.

'More or less', 'Right or wrong', 'In general', and 'Just thinking out loud ' (as usual).
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@ROMARY 1 wrote:

Obviously, not only humans have feelings..........

 

Wishing her and baby well and safe.

 

And all of us, and all animals and nature.


Did you notice?? The baby has a heart on his tail! Heart

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Re: Some good news

[ Edited ]

@emmygrace  The baby will have a heart marking.  That photo is the mom.  Different groups of Orcas have different markings (called the saddle) on either the upper or lower part of the body.  The mom will have to teach her baby how to breathe.  The baby will also be taught how to sleep! To prevent drowning.  They sleep with their brains half awake and half asleep.  All Marine Mammals...Dolphins & Whales have to do this.  This group is the endangered one.  Only 71 individuals are left.  3 of the females are pregnant. The other Orca groups seem to be doing well, population wise.

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Re: Some good news

[ Edited ]

Just got a picture in of new mom and baby.  Can't see it too well, as it's tight by the mother.  I think it's a girl, judging by the curved dorsal.  But I'm not sure.  She has to prop the baby for it to learn how to breathe

 

Image

The orca Tahlequah, also known as J35, swims with her new calf in the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Is there a website to follow this?  I really find it interesting to learn about the orcas.