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Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,330
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

It seems this is the newest way to watch different programs.  From what I understand, you sign up with a co. that offers streaming and your given certain regular channels to watch but you can also stream.  I guess some kind of connection is made thru your Internet but evidentially is has to have a certain amount of power to stream (I don't know if power is the accurate word).  You pay the co. for the pkg. you selected (monthly) and I was told there is no charge for streaming but I find that hard to believe.  If you have more details, please share.

 P,S,  Personally, all I want to do is turn on the TV and select what I want to watch.  I do not want to flick through thousands of options to stream.
kindness is strength
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,292
Registered: ‎02-07-2011

@KatCat1   Completely agree with your P.S.  I find this "streaming" thing very confusing.  But we have 3 TVs and we're going to try "streaming" on one of them.  Cable is getting more expensive but I'm not sure how much we'd save with streaming.

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,055
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Peacock is included in our cable package.  We recently bought a new TV and there are several other streaming channels included with it that are free.  

We had Netflix for about 18 months or so but we watched it so little that I got rid of it.

 

I like having the streaming channels available for shows I cannot watch on the cable channels.

“People do, I don’t.”
Cosmo Kramer
Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,267
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

You need high-speed internet, at least 25 Mbps and more for HD/4K.  If you have multiple wi-fi devices connected to your internet then consider getting a faster internet service otherwise you'll be running into buffering issues.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,200
Registered: ‎06-19-2010

Streaming is a piece of cake. We have Hulu. Simply turn on the TV, select Hulu from the menu (sometimes it's a button on your remote), flip through the channels. It's not rocket science. If you don't like Hulu, cancel it at any time and pick another one etc. if you don't want to watch Hulu (or whatever) you can stay on live tv. You pay for the service monthly. That's it. My cable bill was over $200 a month for garbage. Now I pay $70 for Hulu. I also have Prime. If you don't want a service you can get tons of stuff for free.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,620
Registered: ‎10-09-2012

Six or seven years ago I bought Roku sticks -- one for each TV -- after deactivating my cable.

 

I purchased SlingTV, Netflix, and Hulu streaming channels.  I already had Amazon Prime from my shopping.

 

I turn on my TV; if I want network channels and sports, I click on SlingTV, and choose what I want to see.  

 

For new movies, TV programs and old-school movies & TV shows, I watch Netflix or Hulu.

 

Plus, there are loads of free channels available with Roku -- like all the 7 QVC & HSN channels and their videos they make available to stream. I get streamed exercise programs this way.

 

Almost all streaming channels offer a free trial period if there's a movie I want to see but don't want to pay for the channel itself.  I watch plenty on HBO, AppleTV, Disney+, etc. that way. 

 

I don't find it any different from turning on my TV and selecting the channel I want to watch, like I did when I had cable.  But I'm watching a wider breath of shows, and paying over $150 less per month for three TVs (my Xfinity bill was ridiculous!).

 

I still get my wi-fi internet service from Xfinity.  When I notice any buffering problems, I call them for a check up on the speed.  Twice since I've had Roku, Xfinity has come out to install an upgraded modem, at no additional cost to me. Buffering stops immediately.   

Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,267
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

With streaming how do you record your favorite shows? For instance, on my DirecTV Genie I can record dozens of shows and have them record each week on a regular schedule which I can modify at any time. How can you do that with streaming?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,116
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Caaareful Shopper @Meowingkitty when you say flip through the channels, is it like regular tv or do you have to scroll through boxes and boxes of stuff to find what you are looking for?

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,116
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@KatCat1 wrote:

It seems this is the newest way to watch different programs.  From what I understand, you sign up with a co. that offers streaming and your given certain regular channels to watch but you can also stream.  I guess some kind of connection is made thru your Internet but evidentially is has to have a certain amount of power to stream (I don't know if power is the accurate word).  You pay the co. for the pkg. you selected (monthly) and I was told there is no charge for streaming but I find that hard to believe.  If you have more details, please share.

 P,S,  Personally, all I want to do is turn on the TV and select what I want to watch.  I do not want to flick through thousands of options to stream.

@KatCat1 that's what I want to be able to do.  Like right now with cable if I want to watch Bravo all I have to do is enter 44 on the remote. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,570
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Where we live I have to sign up for each streaming service individually.  So far its only Netflix and Hulu and I have cancelled them both for short periods.  That is the plus with streaming, no contracts, at least I haven't encountered any.  What I am worried about is putting my credit card out all over the net.  I have a new card due to a very minor problem with Amazon and I am super careful with it.  There were companies like Rolling Stone magazine that automatically renewed even though they weren't supposed to.  From now on magazine scripts will be paid by check.