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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

My uncle is the same way about his banking.  He doesn't trust banks to begin with (depression era child) and he has a real fear of the FDIC protections limit, so he is constantly asking questions.  He would not be amused to have a "team" in the room when he is reviewing his finances.

 

My gynecologist's practice always has interns each year.  Before I go in for my appointment, the front desk gives me a form to review that explains the intern's role, what they will and will not do and I sign that I agree or decline each and every item including not having them in the room.  So, there's no surprise when they walk in the door and there's no awkward conversation about "is it okay if the intern stays?" right in front of the intern.

 

I always agree as I have nothing to hide (LOL) and they have to learn somehow.  However, I don't enjoy having my ovaries squeezed twice, but there are worse things.  

 

My grandmother was diagnosed with cervical cancer at 83.  She had never had a gyn exam before that (she had her children at home with midwives).  Her first experience was with a teaching hospital, so my aunt had to have a note on her file to not allow the students in.  One intern is one thing, 15 interns oggling you is another.

===================================
QVC Shopper - 1993

# IAMTEAMWEN
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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy


@missy1 wrote:

Around here the banking industry has a high turnover rate with tellers, loan processors, etc.

Are you all saying you have had the same banker (person) the whole time you banked there?


@missy1 ... That's it in a nutshell. In this small town, even the tellers have been here forever at this bank. Our personal banker has been with this company since the '70s. She has worked her way up, and is now Asst. Manager.

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. ~~ Steve Maraboli
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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy


@Sunshine45 wrote:

i am sure you have the right to ask a trainee to leave or a medical student to leave, but what is going to stop your financial advisor or doctor from going over everything with him AFTER you leave so that they learn from the situation. i dont understand how they are supposed to learn if no one lets them into the meeting?


Medical records are extremely private. I know...I was a health professional. If a doctor wants to discuss a case with a student, he cannot mention names. No other person except a person who has direct authority to see a patient's chart can look at it. There are departments in hospitals that monitor that situation. Employees are not permitted to mention a patient in any way that identifies that patient...even in the cafeteria or an elevator.

 

Apparently the banking industry does not have those strict sort of guidelines yet, but I wonder if someone who is not working directly with you has the right to look up your financial records. I'll bet it comes to that soon.

 

 

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. ~~ Steve Maraboli
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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

Maybe if these employees that have been there a long time will be retiring. So someone would need trained for their job. How else are they to learn if not watching how it is to be done? You can only read so much and it is not the same. I would rather have a properly trained banker then one that did not know the job. Besides every employee of the bank can pull up your mom's info on the computer. Every employee is also told about keeping things private. You may never talk about someones finances.

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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

@Havarti ... I definitely would not be going to that financial planner if he "always" had the insurance agent present.

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. ~~ Steve Maraboli
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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy


@Sunshine45 wrote:

i am sure you have the right to ask a trainee to leave or a medical student to leave, but what is going to stop your financial advisor or doctor from going over everything with him AFTER you leave so that they learn from the situation. i dont understand how they are supposed to learn if no one lets them into the meeting?


There are plenty of clients who would not object. The occasional person who objects is not going to prevent the trainee from learning. In fact, it may contribute to his learning once he understands how private some people consider their situation.

A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal. ~~ Steve Maraboli
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Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

You're doing business with a bank, not a person.  The bank has different representatives, all of whom are required to keep your information confidential.

The tellers have acess to all of your information and so does every platform person.  It only makes sense.  If a person is ill one day, another person needs to be able to handle your business.

No one cares how you handle your money.  The figures are just numbers on a screen and bankers see thousands of them in a day.

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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

That's a good question, I hope someone who really knows the answer weighs in.  I do think you or your mother should have said firmly that you did not want to discuss the matter with a third party in the room.  Yes, indeed shadowing is a part of the training and education process in many fields.  It's very important and necessary bu the customer or patient can always refuse.  The bank ignored your mother because she was vague and wishy washy.  Assertiveness counts....especially for women.  You mother should have reminded the banker that she's a CUSTOMER and wishes prevail and then she should have said, she'd be back when she could discuss her business in private.....and she'd CALL first to ensure it.  And then she should have left.  Trust me, that banker wasn't going to let her leave.

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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy

As a customer, your mother's request should have been honored whether there is a regulation or not. Maybe she should change banks and let her current bank know why. I would and I would make a stink about it. If her bank has a facebook page, register your complaint there and it shoukd be addressed.
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Re: Questions Regarding Banking Privacy


@Kachina624 wrote:

I expect to see all privacy laws including HIPAA go out the window.  That way special interests can send you solicitations about your specific medical conditions.  Looser banking regs are already in the works.   Brace yourselves. 


 

       Huh?   If HIPPA privacy regs leave then your insurance company can...and will send your medical records and details about your health to your employer and to your health insurer and and in the event of your death, to your life insurance company and if you are famous, to the media.  And anyone who works in a doctor's office or hospital can tell your neighbors all about that lumpy rash you have on your axx....that's what you want???