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Registered: ‎03-16-2010

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@pitdakota wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

The only way mortality rates can be determined is by knowing exactly how many were sick and how many pass away from the respective viruses.  No agency has  that information.  Everything is a statistical guess based on the information currently available.  Information is changing daily.

 

The number of people who never seek medical attention, never show symptoms  or are not tested can greatly skew these rates.


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@CrazyDaisy, We don't use mortality rates when talking about epidemics or pandemics. 

 

There are all kinds of percentages that we do use when evaluating threats of communicable disease that factor in risk, etc.   Same mathematical equation they use for the flu.  No one has ever had an exact count of every single individual that has contracted a certain strain of flu in a defined area either.

 

Morbidity rates are numbers of people that have at disease, but we don't use morbidity rates when dealing with epidemics pertaining to communicable disease either. 


ALL are a statistical guess based on assumptions and limited data.


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Yep, and they are consistent and reliant over time.  Smiley Happy   Smiley Happy   Smiley Happy  

 


* Freedom has a taste the protected will never know *
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Registered: ‎03-20-2010

@pitdakota wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@pitdakota wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

The only way mortality rates can be determined is by knowing exactly how many were sick and how many pass away from the respective viruses.  No agency has  that information.  Everything is a statistical guess based on the information currently available.  Information is changing daily.

 

The number of people who never seek medical attention, never show symptoms  or are not tested can greatly skew these rates.


_____________________________________________________

 

@CrazyDaisy, We don't use mortality rates when talking about epidemics or pandemics. 

 

There are all kinds of percentages that we do use when evaluating threats of communicable disease that factor in risk, etc.   Same mathematical equation they use for the flu.  No one has ever had an exact count of every single individual that has contracted a certain strain of flu in a defined area either.

 

Morbidity rates are numbers of people that have at disease, but we don't use morbidity rates when dealing with epidemics pertaining to communicable disease either. 


ALL are a statistical guess based on assumptions and limited data.


__________________________________________________

 

Yep, and they are consistent and reliant over time.  Smiley Happy   Smiley Happy   Smiley Happy  

 


However can be wrong short term, sometimes significantly.

Don't be so afraid of dying that you forget how to live.
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@CrazyDaisy, with an emerging disease all numbers will fluctuate sometimes on a daily basis.

 

But long term wise, when it comes down to what the experts are saying even in the short term, their stats are pretty consistent and not off by much.  Pretty impressive really.  

 

 

 

 

 

 


* Freedom has a taste the protected will never know *
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@pitdakota wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

The only way mortality rates can be determined is by knowing exactly how many were sick and how many pass away from the respective viruses.  No agency has  that information.  Everything is a statistical guess based on the information currently available.  Information is changing daily.

 

The number of people who never seek medical attention, never show symptoms  or are not tested can greatly skew these rates.


_____________________________________________________

 

@CrazyDaisy, We don't use mortality rates when talking about epidemics or pandemics. 

 

There are all kinds of percentages that we do use when evaluating threats of communicable disease that factor in risk, etc.   Same mathematical equation they use for the flu.  No one has ever had an exact count of every single individual that has contracted a certain strain of flu in a defined area either.

 

Morbidity rates are numbers of people that have at disease, but we don't use morbidity rates when dealing with epidemics pertaining to communicable disease either. 


@pitdakota, interesting. I keep seeing mortality rates being mentioned by experts in the field.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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Registered: ‎09-18-2010

@Reever wrote:

@SydneyH wrote:

Because some of us, actually a lot come to think of it, have to work or go to school?  What kind of question is this?


 

 

Everyone has to balance and prioritize what is important to them.  To me, life is more important than a job or school


What on earth? Of course life is more important, but this is not possible. Unless people can just quit their jobs. My sister in law is a counselor at a high school. She cannot just stay home.

I have several nieces and nephews of all ages who are in school. They cannot just stay home. If the parents just quit sending them to school, they'd get in trouble, if the schools weren't shut down. And here they aren't.

 

My husband works at a nuclear power plant. Do you want to have electricity? What about people who work for the water department? And people in health care? Lord help us if they just up and decided they were going to stay home.

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@sidsmom wrote:

@buffalogal47 wrote:

Even doctors are saying this virus isn't nearly as bad as they first thought. 

 


@buffalogal47 

Who these supposed 'doctors' saying this?

 


Yes, source please?

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Corona is indeed a killer virus especially among elderly and immune-compromised people. And according to Dr Anthony Fauci the mortality rate is 10 times that of the flu.

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@4labs wrote:

Corona is indeed a killer virus especially among elderly and immune-compromised people. And according to Dr Anthony Fauci the mortality rate is 10 times that of the flu.


 

Im frightened @4labs.

 

 

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@Kachina624 wrote:

People are active; have places to go and things to do.  Families with children have activities.  They are not sedentary seniors who can just sit and rock.


 

Is that what you think seniors do?  I have senior friends who are extremely physically active - far more than many younger people.  And they have lives that are full - friends, social activities, classes, running their own businesses, etc.  A few of them do AIDS cycle marathons, others regularly run 5K's, ski, etc.

 

My mother is in her late 80's, has some medical issues, and is in Assisted Living,  Even she doesn't "just sit and rock"!

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@lmtep wrote:

@buffalogal47 wrote:

Coronavirus is hardly a killer virus. The mortality rate is much lower than the ordinary flu. It does seem to be more contagious though but everyone who has had it and recovered says it was not that bad. The people who have died from this illness were either frail elderly or had other underlying chronic health issues. Everyone is drastically overreacting. 


No everyone is but there are always those that spread doom and gloom and panic.  Live and let live.  This is no worse than the ordinary flu we experience very year.  Dealing with the ones spreading panic is more bothersome.


 

It is worse than ordinary flu because so little is known about it.  It wasn't taken seriously in Italy, and look what happened.  We need to learn from that.  There's no need to panic, but we certainly should learn from it and take precautions.