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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

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My Nana was 70 years old when my Mom had to leave my dad  (abusing her and us kids). She took me in and raised me until she had a stroke when I was 12-13; she lived across the street from my Mom amd my aunty was right down the street. Nana never resented me and loved me like she was my own mother-I felt, and feel, the same way.

 

She understood what it was like to be a shy teenage girl, who wanted to wear bell bottoms and be kissed. She was born in 1890 but remembered being a teen girl. I saw her everyday until she passed away when I was 19-that was so hard!

 

The worst thing she could ever call a person was either a Democrat or a Sassenach (Nana  was Scottish).

I remember asking her when I was 6 what a 'battle ax' was? She wanted to know why I would have that question: I replied,'because that is what Daddy calls you". She didnt blink an eye, but said he was a Democrat.

 

She loved to drink whisky sour before dinner and have her hair washed, fluffy and blued.

I picked out the pretty blue dress she had on for her wake; I had bought it for her 85th birthday. It cost $15.00 in the 1970's.

 

There is not a day that I don't think of my Mumma.

When I pass on ,I'll know I'm in heaven if I can see her again.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

My grandma was born in 1901. She was 48 when I was born and probably mid 50's by the time I can remember her.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

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My Grandmother were exact opposites. My Mom's mother was a farmers wife.S he dressed  kind of,  I guess you would say, old fashioned  and a bit dumpy. She was part Indian had a very hard life. She lost 2 husbands, baked at home for bakeries to support her family, while her sons worked at a Creamery. She started her 3 family at age 40. Before she remaried she an another lady ran a boarding house for immigrant workers. They slept in 2 shifts. Grandma and her partner would wash clothes out side on a scrub board

She saved enough money to buy ( probably put the down payment) the farm she and my grandpa would own.

 

She was a fabulous cook and raised my  cousins while their parents worked

 

My Dad's mother always had her hair done, dressed very modern compared to my other Grandma. She played the piano by ear, she always had money to get us  little treats or a toy. My best friend always told me I had the youngest looking Grandma. She had a far easier life than my other one

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

I was born in 1950 and all my grandparents were immigrants.  My paternal, Irish Nan assimilated well but my maternal, Ukrainian grandmother did not.

 

My Ukrainian grandmother did not speak English.  She wore house dresses, always an apron, rolled down stockings and a babushka over her long gray hair (worn in a tight bun)  She had thick glasses and seldom wore her false teeth.  We were afraid of her as she was often hollering at her husband.

 

My Irish Nan had short curly hair that was usually styled by the neighborhood beautician.  She always wore a dress and her only make-up was lipstick. (she had a hard time keeping it within her lip lone and off her teeth)  Her "pocketbook"  was usually within reach, as was her coat and hat. (she went to Mass daily)  We loved going to her house. (my father was born in it)

 

Neither of my grandmothers would ever be mistaken for June Cleaver.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

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@SahmIam wrote:

My grandmother was born in 1898. When the Roaring 20's hit, she cut her hair super short, raised her hemlines and never looked back; she was always dressed fashionably.  The pictures I have of her and her younger sister.... WOW. Gorgeous women. Her daughters followed suit and so on. 

 

She was an amazing seamstress so ALL of their clothes were made by her or tailored by her for a custom fit. I learned early on that is the secret to looking great.


Honestly I think my grandma was a wild child. She & grandpa eloped in 1920 and I saw a photo someone took of them that day - OMG her skirt was actually a mini. A very mini ! She had a preemie about 6 months after she was married but he died and , of course, everyone thought they had to get married and he wasn't a premmie at all.I guess it ruined her reputation. My grandparents had a group of friends they hung around with that called themselves The Gems.We knew all the gems well, it was like having 6 sets of grandparents.They were lively - they'd play cards on Saturday night for money and go out to nightclubs to see bands & dance. They would go see all the latest movies. We loved staying with grandma on Saturday night because we would always do something fun.And just take us with them.

This grandma did not have to do any work around the house - she was a nurse and went back to work during WW11 because they were desparate for nurses, so she paid a lady who took care of her home and cooking etc. A nice young lady named Minnie, who really did not like kids and so we were not allowed to bother her at all.Grandma stopped working full time when I was little but they still employed Minnie until both grandparents had died.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids


@151949 wrote:

My grandma was born in 1901. She was 48 when I was born and probably mid 50's by the time I can remember her.


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@151949

 

Your grandmother was still young.  My grandmother was older when my father was born and my father was middle aged when I was born.  She was a widow and had been a minister's wife.  She dressed well every day, used her good china every day, taught me how to play piano, studied and wrote every day.  When she died, she was elderly and working on a paper comparing the influence of the Bible on the works of Shakespeare.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

@Noel7 Your grandma sounds a bit like mine.( Except for the studious part). She was really ahead of her time wasn't she?.I've seen TV shows talking about Shakespeare's catholic background hidden in his plays

It might have been the religious background, Grammies dad was a minister too and good china was used daily, and the piano was played  for her enjoyment and that of us children

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

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My grandmas both lived in Pasadena, CA.  My father's mother was raised in an orphanage.  She has seven children and there was very little discipline.  It was a crazy Irish Catholic family.  My grandfather tried to instill some order but was usually unsuccessful.  As a small child I was always overwhelmed by them.  

 

My mother's mother was born in Iowa and came to Pasadena at age 13 when her father retired and moved.  They were a well to do family.  At her house all meals were eaten in the formal dining room.  You did not come to the table (even breakfast) if you were not properly dressed.  Manners were most important.  She never wore pants.  I remember her in a dress, nylons and heels in the yard gardening.  She taught me many things that served me well in life.  She volunteered for the Red Cross for over 50 years.  She was president of the American Legion Auxillary for the state of California.  She was the Orange County Register Volunteer of the Year.  

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids


@cherry wrote:

@Noel7 Your grandma sounds a bit like mine.( Except for the studious part). She was really ahead of her time wasn't she?.I've seen TV shows talking about Shakespeare's catholic background hidden in his plays

It might have been the religious background, Grammies dad was a minister too and good china was used daily, and the piano was played  for her enjoyment and that of us children


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Hi @cherry Smiley Happy 

 

Oh, I definitely think it was the religious background.  She was also used to caring for the manse and people dropping in at all hours.  I think that was why she was always well dressed until bed time.  After she was widowed she just kept on in the same way. 

 

Thanks for mentioning the religious/Shakespeare connection, I didn't know it had progressed.

 

My other grandmother was Irish Catholic and very different.  My mother was raised Catholic and took me to mass as a child.

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Re: Our grandmas when we were kids

@annabellethecat. I think it's so wonderful that you remember the lessons your grandmother taught you and are passing them down to future generations! I remember things my grandmother taught me! I only wish I'd been able to spend more time with her! We lived a thousand miles away!

 

My dad's mother was the stero-typical grandmother! She was always corseted up, lace up black shoes, and gray permed hair in an invisible hair net. I remember her only as "up tight" in every sense of the word! It was like if a button popped she fly to pieces! (In every respect!) my mother's mother was the opposite! I loved hugging her! She was soft and smelled good! She was beautiful and dressed well, always! We always had fun with her but even the worst of the boys respected her belongings because she did!  I was recently talking with a friend about how the image of grandmothers has changed! My mother never looked like the typical grandmother and I'm pretty sure I don't, either! I only hope we all write down the important lessons we've learned from our ancestors so our future generations will know them, too!  My uncle was a doctor and when a grandmother came in with her daughter and grand, and the daughter would say, " My mother thinks I should have done xyz or wants me to do abc with my child" my uncle would smile and tell them to listen to the grandmother! There are some things we don't know, but through lessons and experience, we do know a great deal, and most of it is practical!

Never underestimate the power of kindness.