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Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,160
Registered: ‎05-19-2012

itsmagic,

 

I am sorry for the loss of your friend.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,673
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

The 1918 flu, also known as the Spanish Flu, lasted until 1920.

 

Before COVID-19, the most severe pandemic in recent history was the 1918 influenza virus, often called “the Spanish Flu.” The virus infected roughly 500 million people—one-third of the world’s population—and caused 50 million deaths worldwide (double the number of deaths in World War I). In the United States, a quarter of the population caught the virus, 675,000 died, and life expectancy dropped by 12 years. With no vaccine to protect against the virus, people were urged to isolate, quarantine, practice good personal hygiene, and limit social interaction.

 

The first recorded U.S. case of the new virus was also reported on January 20, in an American citizen traveling from Wuhan, China, to his home in Washington state.

 

On December 14, the U.S. surpassed 300,000 deaths, with an average more than 961 deaths per day since the first known deaths in February. More than 50,000 deaths were reported in the past month.

 

On December 17, the U.S. passed 17 million case

 

On December 21, the U.S. passed 18 million cases

 

By December 26, one out of every 1,000 Americans have died from COVID-19.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,730
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

The impact of this pandemic cannot be measured by mortality rates alone, although they are bad enough.  People are suffering long term effects from Covid and the toll on healthcare workers, first responders etc. is simply tragic.  People no doubt already have and will suffer from PTSD, in part because so many have disregarded basic preventative measures for a variety of very sad reasons.

 

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,287
Registered: ‎09-18-2010

@Marp wrote:

The 1918 flu, also known as the Spanish Flu, lasted until 1920.

 

Before COVID-19, the most severe pandemic in recent history was the 1918 influenza virus, often called “the Spanish Flu.” The virus infected roughly 500 million people—one-third of the world’s population—and caused 50 million deaths worldwide (double the number of deaths in World War I). In the United States, a quarter of the population caught the virus, 675,000 died, and life expectancy dropped by 12 years. With no vaccine to protect against the virus, people were urged to isolate, quarantine, practice good personal hygiene, and limit social interaction.

 

The first recorded U.S. case of the new virus was also reported on January 20, in an American citizen traveling from Wuhan, China, to his home in Washington state.

 

On December 14, the U.S. surpassed 300,000 deaths, with an average more than 961 deaths per day since the first known deaths in February. More than 50,000 deaths were reported in the past month.

 

On December 17, the U.S. passed 17 million case

 

On December 21, the U.S. passed 18 million cases

 

By December 26, one out of every 1,000 Americans have died from COVID-19.


Thank you, @Marp

I will not be trying to minimize

this, I appreciate all of your info about these statistics.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,580
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

I was doing research and nearly 2.4 million people die each year in the U.S. Nearly 45,000 die in road accidents. Homicides, drunk driving and poisoning kill 17,000 people a year. These are disturbing facts and this does not minimize what is happening in our country but we need some perspective. It is strange we have no deaths from the flu. I am just trying to say we have to realize many people who have succumbed to Covid may have had underlying causes. I think life goes on and sorrow is part of it.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,185
Registered: ‎05-01-2010

@elated wrote:

I was doing research and nearly 2.4 million people die each year in the U.S. Nearly 45,000 die in road accidents. Homicides, drunk driving and poisoning kill 17,000 people a year. These are disturbing facts and this does not minimize what is happening in our country but we need some perspective. It is strange we have no deaths from the flu. I am just trying to say we have to realize many people who have succumbed to Covid may have had underlying causes. I think life goes on and sorrow is part of it.


@elated  I really don't go by any of the posted statistics. They can come from anywhere and all be different. That being said, yes people die from all the reasons you listed which is part of life. However, I have been lucky to not know anyone who died from these awful ways. Have I know anyone who's died from COVID? It's up to 8 people my husband was friends with that have passed away. A town of maybe 13,000 people. For me, that is the way I must relate to this horrible pandemic. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,611
Registered: ‎05-13-2010

Re: One in One Thousand

[ Edited ]

The WA outfit estimates 567,000 deaths from covid by April 1.  In a year we will have suffered that many and more over the usual number.

 

There is such unusual grief associated with these deaths.  I feel I am part of this society and I am obligated to be mindful of such a tragedy.

 

@DrytheYes, Germany is a good comparison.  Why aren't we doing as well as Germany?

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,606
Registered: ‎04-23-2010

@KarenQVC wrote:

The WA outfit estimates 567,000 deaths from covid by April 1.  In a year we will have suffered that many and more over the usual number.

 

There is such unusual grief associated with these deaths.  I feel I am part of this society and I am obligted to be mindful of such a tragedy.

 

@DrytheYes, Germany is a good comparison.  Why aren't we doing as well as Germany?


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