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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,580
Registered: ‎06-15-2015

Re: MRI and hearing loss

[ Edited ]

@sfnative wrote:



Hi John,

 

My issue was relevant to a dinosaur of an MRI unit that sounded like an engine throwing its rods next to my ears.  I've had many MRIs, but knew instantly that something was not right with this machine.  Had I known the decibel level would be such as to cause hearing loss in my left ear, I would have pushed the panic button.  I partly blame myself.

 

 

Hi Rebecca,

 

I worked for over 30 years on manufacturing machine jobs where everyone was suppose to wear ear protection. Problem was working in 110+ temps much of the time, back then there weren't any that did much good. We also had to wear safety glasses, and when sweating profusely, the would slide off my nose, and a strap was just one more thing to increase the discomfort levels.

 

Seldom wore ear protection and by certain portions of some machines the decibel level ran up to 110dB. When OSHA was formed they used to come around with their machines and check the levels, but they did nothing other than check it, and that's it.

 

All maching operators had to take a hearing test every 6 months. If they thought your hearing was being effected? Most of the time they would put you on a much lower paying job along with working nights shift, even if you were currently working day hours. I worked 13 years of night shifts before I had a chance to work days, and no way was I going to lose them.

 

MRI machines didn't really seem loud to me, but then again, neither did working around machines all those years. There were some parts of the machines that had air blowing on the insulated wire(they ran through water to cool and harden the insulation on the phone wires), and those had a real high pitch and I didn't stand around them any more than absolutely necessary.

 

Been a few years since I've had an MRI on my back or anywhere else actually. Most recent were Endo/Colon/Full Body Nuclear and a couple of contrasting CAT Scans and Echo's. None of these really make much noise.

 

When my 1st round of PE's were found it was with a VQ Scan. Now that machine made a lot of noise, but there again, it was nowhere close to what I worked in for all those years. I was just happy when they found the clots as as "Quack" of a Pulmonologist did at least a dozen other tests and all he came up with was "gotta go to the Mayo Clinic".

 

Nothing he did showed up the clots because he was doing the wrong tests. My best doctor friend(Spinal Surgeon)was in Iraq working on the  injured soldiers and learning more about working in a Trauma  Environment.

 

When he came home I explained to him how I was feeling and what I had done as far as tests. He called me the next day and said he had talked with his friend, a Pulomonolgist, and that friend told him he was sure he knew what was happening to me.

 

My friend made an appoinment with this Pulmonologist for 2 days later. He ordered the VQ Scan, had me immediately admitted to the  Critical Care Floor of the hospital and I was put on Hephrine IV. Went in on a Friday to see him and I spend the next 9 days in the hospital.

 

Needless to say I was lucky to have such a good doctor friend. Don't know if I would have survived the PE otherwise. I spend 6 weeks with the "quack", and I also made it well known what little he knew about PE.

 

There is much more to this story, but I will spare you.

 

Rebecca, thank you for everything. My wife is home and doing a little bit more day by day. I am still driving her around because she doesn't feel comfortable enough yet to drive.

 

Take care my friend,

 

JOhn


 

hckynut(john)
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Regular Contributor
Posts: 216
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Did they not offer you ear plugs? the machines are so loud and knock and make such horrible noise. I have had several MRIs and always use ear plugs..I have hearing loss in one ear anyway so maybe just haven't noticed any additional loss..Stay with it and be sure to check with your dr..Good luck

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@hckynutjohn wrote:

@sfnative wrote:



Hi John,

 

My issue was relevant to a dinosaur of an MRI unit that sounded like an engine throwing its rods next to my ears.  I've had many MRIs, but knew instantly that something was not right with this machine.  Had I known the decibel level would be such as to cause hearing loss in my left ear, I would have pushed the panic button.  I partly blame myself.

 

 

Hi Rebecca,

 

I worked for over 30 years on manufacturing machine jobs where everyone was suppose to wear ear protection. Problem was working in 110+ temps much of the time, back then there weren't any that did much good. We also had to wear safety glasses, and when sweating profusely, the would slide off my nose, and a strap was just one more thing to increase the discomfort levels.

 

Seldom wore ear protection and by certain portions of some machines the decibel level ran up to 110dB. When OSHA was formed they used to come around with their machines and check the levels, but they did nothing other than check it, and that's it.

 

All maching operators had to take a hearing test every 6 months. If they thought your hearing was being effected? Most of the time they would put you on a much lower paying job along with working nights shift, even if you were currently working day hours. I worked 13 years of night shifts before I had a chance to work days, and no way was I going to lose them.

 

MRI machines didn't really seem loud to me, but then again, neither did working around machines all those years. There were some parts of the machines that had air blowing on the insulated wire(they ran through water to cool and harden the insulation on the phone wires), and those had a real high pitch and I didn't stand around them any more than absolutely necessary.

 

Been a few years since I've had an MRI on my back or anywhere else actually. Most recent were Endo/Colon/Full Body Nuclear and a couple of contrasting CAT Scans and Echo's. None of these really make much noise.

 

When my 1st round of PE's were found it was with a VQ Scan. Now that machine made a lot of noise, but there again, it was nowhere close to what I worked in for all those years. I was just happy when they found the clots as as "Quack" of a Pulmonologist did at least a dozen other tests and all he came up with was "gotta go to the Mayo Clinic".

 

Nothing he did showed up the clots because he was doing the wrong tests. My best doctor friend(Spinal Surgeon)was in Iraq working on the  injured soldiers and learning more about working in a Trauma  Environment.

 

When he came home I explained to him how I was feeling and what I had done as far as tests. He called me the next day and said he had talked with his friend, a Pulomonolgist, and that friend told him he was sure he knew what was happening to me.

 

My friend made an appoinment with this Pulmonologist for 2 days later. He ordered the VQ Scan, had me immediately admitted to the  Critical Care Floor of the hospital and I was put on Hephrine IV. Went in on a Friday to see him and I spend the next 9 days in the hospital.

 

Needless to say I was lucky to have such a good doctor friend. Don't know if I would have survived the PE otherwise. I spend 6 weeks with the "quack", and I also made it well known what little he knew about PE.

 

There is much more to this story, but I will spare you.

 

Rebecca, thank you for everything. My wife is home and doing a little bit more day by day. I am still driving her around because she doesn't feel comfortable enough yet to drive.

 

Take care my friend,

 

JOhn


 


Hello My Friend!

 

Thank you for sharing your experience.  It's really important for all of us to understand that our doctors aren't gods and they are not the end-all and be-all to every patient and every diagnosis they purport to make.  Many doctors are either too ego-centric to see through the fog of self love or they are simply clueless.  I am so happy that you had the personal contact that you did, as it indeed saved your life.

 

***

Regarding your physician friend who learned so much through practicing trauma in Iraq, I must share with you that part of the job I retired from 2 years ago was to provide trauma training fo deploying physicians (Tauma-Refresher-Course-for-Surgeons).  A week-long course, it consisted of 2.5 days of didactic & 2.5 days of practical for men and women military surgeons who were to be deployed in a few days time.  We had excellent instructors for both the didactic and practical portions of the course and also brought in the private sector vendors who made the devices they would be working with in the field. This last was quite important, as there is no power in the field, so drills are all manual, all external-fixation (used for traumatic fractures) had to be installed manually, bleeding had to be "cauterzed" with new chemical binders instead of clamps and suture, etc.  It was an awesome exprience, which saved many lives and limbs. 

 

***

I'm glad to know that Cindy to getting out and about with your help.  It just takes a darn long time for the body to heal: just take a breath and let it happe. It's especially wonderful when one has such a dedicated partner in life as you, John.

 

Take care of yourself, John, and give all of your kitties a scratch under the chin for me.

 

~Rebecca