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@just bee wrote:

Oh, my goodness, what a timely post!

 

For all you Boomers out there, sit down and pay close attention.  Many of you may feel as I do: Something is amiss.  Something just doesn't add up.  Something just doesn't... feel right.

 

And you're not wrong.

 

See, my siblings were born in the late '40s and early '50s.  They are definitely Boomers.  I, however, the wanted and planned child, arrived in late 1959.  So I get labeled a Boomer?  Excuse me?

 

And I know "Boomers" who came after me.  Sorry, but we are a whole nuther species.

 

And, no, we're not Early Gen X.  I live with an X and we're not that at all.  Are you sitting?  Because this is huge.  Life-changing.  It will suddenly all make perfect sense to you.

 

Were you born during the period of 1955 to 1964?

 

If so, you are Generation Jones -- a Joneser -- and you have Jonathan Pontell to thank.

 

Yes, it was Mr. Pontell who, like many of us, felt no connection to our Boomer brethren.  How could we be the same generation yet be so different?  Our life experiences so far from similar?

 

It's not just a case of Early Boomers and Late Boomers.  Google Generation Jones and do a little research.  I guarantee you will stand up and scream: AT LAST!  AT LAST!  IT ALL MAKES SENSE!!!

 

ETA:

 

Some sources are 1954 to 1964; others are 1954 to 1965 or 1955 to 1964.  Doesn't matter.  You know who you are.


What?  No Jonesers out there?

~My philosophy: Dogs are God's most perfect creatures. Angels, here on Earth, who teach us to be better human beings.~
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I'm a Baby Boomer.  I'm toward the younger end of the range though.

“One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.” ~ Plato
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@just bee wrote:

@just bee wrote:

Oh, my goodness, what a timely post!

 

For all you Boomers out there, sit down and pay close attention.  Many of you may feel as I do: Something is amiss.  Something just doesn't add up.  Something just doesn't... feel right.

 

And you're not wrong.

 

See, my siblings were born in the late '40s and early '50s.  They are definitely Boomers.  I, however, the wanted and planned child, arrived in late 1959.  So I get labeled a Boomer?  Excuse me?

 

And I know "Boomers" who came after me.  Sorry, but we are a whole nuther species.

 

And, no, we're not Early Gen X.  I live with an X and we're not that at all.  Are you sitting?  Because this is huge.  Life-changing.  It will suddenly all make perfect sense to you.

 

Were you born during the period of 1955 to 1964?

 

If so, you are Generation Jones -- a Joneser -- and you have Jonathan Pontell to thank.

 

Yes, it was Mr. Pontell who, like many of us, felt no connection to our Boomer brethren.  How could we be the same generation yet be so different?  Our life experiences so far from similar?

 

It's not just a case of Early Boomers and Late Boomers.  Google Generation Jones and do a little research.  I guarantee you will stand up and scream: AT LAST!  AT LAST!  IT ALL MAKES SENSE!!!

 

ETA:

 

Some sources are 1954 to 1964; others are 1954 to 1965 or 1955 to 1964.  Doesn't matter.  You know who you are.


What?  No Jonesers out there?


I'm at the very end of the Boomers, so I guess that makes me a Joneser. 

~The more someone needs to brag about how wonderful, special, successful, wealthy or important they are, the greater the likelihood that it isn't true. ~

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If you want to set my youngest daughter (just turned 38) on fire just call her a Millannial!  She hates everything it stands for!  (Can't say as I blame her).

 

I think it's a stretch and I resent that people born as late as '64 being called a 'boomer'....come on .... that's quite a stretch.  

 

Most of us real boomers were born right after the War when (mostly) Daddy came home to his woman.  I know I was (I'm 72 this year).....

 

There should be another name for thos born maybe after 55....that's a good cut off.

 

Anyway, the later generations, well, I don't want to get zapped, but....just look at what's a happening...period....

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Re: List of Generations

[ Edited ]

@Annabellethecat wrote:

If you want to set my youngest daughter (just turned 38) on fire just call her a Millannial!  She hates everything it stands for!  (Can't say as I blame her).

 

I think it's a stretch and I resent that people born as late as '64 being called a 'boomer'....come on .... that's quite a stretch.  

 

Most of us real boomers were born right after the War when (mostly) Daddy came home to his woman.  I know I was (I'm 72 this year).....

 

There should be another name for thos born maybe after 55....that's a good cut off.

 

Anyway, the later generations, well, I don't want to get zapped, but....just look at what's a happening...period....


I think that's because people sometimes use the term "Millennial" to describe young people in general, especially when speaking in a negative way. They don't realize that they're actually lumping people as old as your daughter in with college-aged young people (incorrectly).

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@FrostyBabe1 wrote:

@just bee wrote:

@just bee wrote:

Oh, my goodness, what a timely post!

 

For all you Boomers out there, sit down and pay close attention.  Many of you may feel as I do: Something is amiss.  Something just doesn't add up.  Something just doesn't... feel right.

 

And you're not wrong.

 

See, my siblings were born in the late '40s and early '50s.  They are definitely Boomers.  I, however, the wanted and planned child, arrived in late 1959.  So I get labeled a Boomer?  Excuse me?

 

And I know "Boomers" who came after me.  Sorry, but we are a whole nuther species.

 

And, no, we're not Early Gen X.  I live with an X and we're not that at all.  Are you sitting?  Because this is huge.  Life-changing.  It will suddenly all make perfect sense to you.

 

Were you born during the period of 1955 to 1964?

 

If so, you are Generation Jones -- a Joneser -- and you have Jonathan Pontell to thank.

 

Yes, it was Mr. Pontell who, like many of us, felt no connection to our Boomer brethren.  How could we be the same generation yet be so different?  Our life experiences so far from similar?

 

It's not just a case of Early Boomers and Late Boomers.  Google Generation Jones and do a little research.  I guarantee you will stand up and scream: AT LAST!  AT LAST!  IT ALL MAKES SENSE!!!

 

ETA:

 

Some sources are 1954 to 1964; others are 1954 to 1965 or 1955 to 1964.  Doesn't matter.  You know who you are.


What?  No Jonesers out there?


I'm at the very end of the Boomers, so I guess that makes me a Joneser. 


@FrostyBabe1

@Annabellethecat

 

If you go online and do some research about Generation Jones (late Boomers) it makes a lot of sense.  See, even @Annabellethecat, an "early Boomer," feels that there's an obvious difference within this generation.

 

There is!

~My philosophy: Dogs are God's most perfect creatures. Angels, here on Earth, who teach us to be better human beings.~
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Re: List of Generations

[ Edited ]

I think the silent generation might be misnamed.  During the 1920's  America saw mass immigration.  People were adapting and making their way.  Things became more mechanized.  People were also sick of war.  Many people who immigrated escaped war, America had suffered financially as well as the human loss from WWI  and the Influenza epidemic of 1918. They remained as a group unwilling to enter a war until Pearl Harbor.  I think the silent generation was extremely patriotic.  As they entered the 20's, money was spent decadantly, by the 30's no one had money.  We were slipping into the Great Depression, and once that hit full force people were concerned with feeding themselves, and keeping a roof over their heads.  This was the generation with no medicare, no SS, and no welfare. Do or die.   I think they were a tough lot