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Honored Contributor
Posts: 36,748
Registered: ‎08-19-2010

wish I could get nomorerobo. I've lived in Ind and now in Tx still can't get it

not in the cards for me, but, my call blocker is a God send.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,607
Registered: ‎03-21-2017

A true landline is connected back to your local central office and uses their batteries and backup generators (old-timey phone).  So you still have service when you lose power.  Cordless phones have a plugin base that use electricity, so they won’t work even if you have a true landline when you lose power. It must be be one or extension phones each connected to their own wall jack.  VOIP’s are home phones, but they are not true landlines.  They don’t have a central ofc connection. 🙂

 

I will nevah give up my landline. 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,279
Registered: ‎11-15-2011

@Hippiified wrote:

A true landline is connected back to your local central office and uses their batteries and backup generators (old-timey phone).  So you still have service when you lose power.  Cordless phones have a plugin base that use electricity, so they won’t work even if you have a true landline when you lose power. It must be be one or extension phones each connected to their own wall jack.  VOIP’s are home phones, but they are not true landlines.  They don’t have a central ofc connection. 🙂

 

I will nevah give up my landline. 

 


I do believe the phone will still work to make calls, it will not ring.  The ringer is electric. 

 

We had the electricity go out at the Sheriff's ofc when I was a telephone operator and the phones would work, they just would not ring.  You can call out and monitor for incoming calls.  That is what they did and it worked.

 

I have a plug in, phone only, unit that I keep for emergencies.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,429
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Hippiified wrote:

A true landline is connected back to your local central office and uses their batteries and backup generators (old-timey phone).  So you still have service when you lose power.  Cordless phones have a plugin base that use electricity, so they won’t work even if you have a true landline when you lose power. It must be be one or extension phones each connected to their own wall jack.  VOIP’s are home phones, but they are not true landlines.  They don’t have a central ofc connection. 🙂

 

I will nevah give up my landline. 

 

I  have limited  landline service. I use my cell phone for long distance.  I keep a regular plug in phone. I do like my cordless phones.  

 


 

Super Contributor
Posts: 354
Registered: ‎10-17-2010

I used to have a land line with Verizon.  Then I switched to OOMA which is an Internet phone.  Still have the same land line number though, so I tend to think I have a land line.  lol

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,191
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Getting ready to order OOMA.  We will have our land line # transferred.  Sick to death of paying a fortune every month with Century Link.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,824
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

I’ve had phone service for 43 years, and will not get rid of my landline, since it is the only contact number I ever give out.   

 

My cell phone is for me to communicate with my on the go daughters, and for texting a small core group of family and friends.   This number is not given out freely.  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,607
Registered: ‎03-21-2017

@PickyCindy wrote:

I used to have a land line with Verizon.  Then I switched to OOMA which is an Internet phone.  Still have the same land line number though, so I tend to think I have a land line.  lol


@PickyCindy

Sorry, they let you keep your number, but you no longer have a true land line.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 579
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

I keep my landline, it works if the power goes out. It's the contact # I give out. My cell # is only shared with family, a few friends, and a backup emergency contact # at the hospital, doc office, and school.

 

Our local Office of Emergency Services  put out an announcement recently, recommending that residents maintain landlines because:

 

1) It is easier and faster for them to pinpoint our location in case we have an emergency.

2) Emergency notifications such as tornado warnings are sent to all landlines in the county.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,421
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

It's a sign of age, I guess.  Neither one of us like talking on our cell phones. It's much easier to see the numbers and letters on our landline too - a lot easier and the keyboard doesn't disappear or fade.