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Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎06-11-2011

Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE


@Group 5 minus 1 wrote:

Great film w/Dustin Hoffman about the mysterious disappearance of AC. I believe it is called "Agatha".


I love Christie but thought this film was a bore.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 65,778
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE

Speaking of Agatha... I truly wish one of my local PBS stations would resurrect the Miss Marple movies. They're so good, done so well and with such style. Offerings, overall, have been dismal on all my local PBS stations for some months and seeing these again would be a vast, VAST improvement over the stuff they're foisting out there...


In my pantry with my cupcakes...
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,541
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE

Wow, @AuntG ,  I knew there was an uproar when she disappeared, but not that other authors like Conan Doyle were trying to help find her--  that is so interesting!

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Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE

I, too, started reading Christie books as a young teen. Still love mysteries. Right now, I am in the midst of watching through Marple (with Geraldine McEwan and Julia McKenzie) on BritBox.

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Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE

I can't claim to be an Agatha Christie connoisseur, however, the genealogist in me was curious as to her posterity. I thought some of you fans might enjoy an interview I came across with her grandson Matthew Prichard: In part, he says:

 

"I suppose it took some time for it to sink in that I had a famous grandmother known to the world as Agatha Christie. In ... small ways...did I become aware that I had a talented grandmother. Not that it made a great deal of difference to me. She was just a marvellous grandmother and someone nice to have around. I think perhaps there were four things which, more than anything else endeared her to me. The first was her modesty. To the outside world I suppose this appeared as shyness, but to us she was always infinitely more interested in what we were thinking and doing than in herself. She could manage to write a book almost without one noticing and sometimes she used to read the new one to us in the summer down in Devonshire. She did so partly, I suspect, to test audience reaction, but partly to entertain us on the inevitable wet afternoons when, no doubt, I was rather difficult to amuse! We all tried to guess, and my mother was the only one who was ever right. I think most of my friends who met her during those years were quite astonished that such a mild, gentle grandmother could really be the authoress of all those stories of intrigue, murder and jealousy."

 

"Her next great characteristic was her generosity. It is by now well-known that she gave me The Mousetrap for my ninth birthday. I do not, I’m afraid, remember much about the actual presentation (if there was one) and probably nobody realised until much later what a marvellous present it was, but it is perhaps worth remembering that my grandmother had been through many times in her life when money was not plentiful. It was therefore incredibly generous of her to give away such a play to her grandson, as in 1952 her books were only approaching the enormous success they have now become. It is also a mistake to think of her generosity only in terms of money. She loved giving pleasure to others – good food, a holiday, a present, or a birthday ode. She loved enjoying herself, and also to see others around her enjoying themselves."

 

"The third thing I always enjoyed was her enthusiasm. Despite her modesty or shyness, it was never far below the surface. I think she always had a love/fright relationship with the theatre. Although I am sure she found experience very wearing, she always enjoyed other people’s enthusiasm for her plays and found it infectious. I went to The Mousetrap several times with her in varying company – family parties, girlfriends, and the Eton cricket team when I was captain in 1962. I would say we all enjoyed the play and my grandmother’s company in equal measure. But she was enthusiastic about other people’s plays as well, about archaeology, opera and perhaps above all about food! In short, she was an exciting person to be with because she always tried to look on the good side of things and people; she always found something to enthuse about.

 

"My grandmother died in January 1976. My family received hundreds of letters from all different walks of life and every part of the world, and I have never seen such a uniform expression of devotion and admiration. No doubt that was because she was a kind, generous and devout person, and preferred always to believe the best of people. She never had an unkind word to say about anybody. We were all left with many happy memories and, of course, all her books and plays, which I am sure will be enjoyed for many generations to come."

 

"...It is inevitable perhaps that my own impressions of my grandmother are rather personal ones. She was, above all, a family person and through everybody, from the literary world, from the world of archaeology and from the stage has good reason to be grateful to her it is her family who have the most to be grateful for – her kindness, her charity, and for just being herself.

 

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Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: JANUARY 21, AND ENTER AGATHA CHRISTIE

Thank you so much for finding this, thoughtful @cimeranrose !   Few things are as fascinating as the observations of the family and loved ones of historical and literary figures.  It's always a bit of a jolt to hear the family's perspective, since of course, they're focused on the down-to-earth, human, familial aspects, while we tend to idealize the writers we cherish.  Lovely to hear about the real, warm and kind Agatha Christie.  Terrific interview!