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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,495
Registered: ‎05-03-2014

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?

@caravaggio, sorry, didn't want to start a really long comment train. Smiley Tongue

 

 

Yes, I understand. I suppose everyone's different. Some people can be hurt by animals and still like to be around them. I think there also might be people who've been hurt by animals who might still be a bit scared by them.

 

 

A little off topic, I know. Just thinking out loud, I guess. Smiley Happy

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,112
Registered: ‎12-08-2014

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?

No Cecil is not a tipping point; the story has already lost it's legs.  It captured everyone's hearts because it's summer and there wasn't much news and he's a lion.  Everyone loves lions, king of the beasts.  It surprised us all that a protected animal like that could become a victim of hunters.  But nothing has changed and nothing will change.  The companies that arrange those slaughter tours and the local guides probably will be less concerned with satistying the requests of weathly hunters who want their trophy kills and they will follow the local laws and regulations...for a while.  Those countries need the income that hunting provides.  I do think that there will come a time when blood sports will come to an end.  This Cecil incident was one very small step toward that.  But....as the saying goes....a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.  Or something like that. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 22,087
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@caravaggio wrote:

@Sooner wrote:

I think what some are trying to point out here is that there seems to be more outrage over this than over the killing, starvation and abuse of people in many places on that continent.  There are so many horriffic things that happen to people there, and perhaps that should be noted as well when this topic comes up.  That is something we can so something about too.  There are many aid groups and religious organizations there trying to help the human suffering on a one to one basis.

 

Somehow it seems callous to be talking about this and not to mention that as well.  


Why?Do you not have ability to give attention to more then one cause or concern? Animal activist on this board never go out of there way to bring up the suffereing of animals on threads about human suffereing so why do you feel the need to go off topic  and do that?

 

Again my mantra is we are supposed to be the Stewards of this World.

 

That is for the innocents who can not speak. Including animals who suffer the most regardless of what you may think. Millions of livestock are slaughtered everyday. But that is OK because we are consumers right? So if time is spent talking about the horrific death of one animal try to not soapbox all the human suffereing that goes on as well. We got a thread for that  and you are welcome to share your thoughts. I think as a  human it is in our nature and capacity to want to help the suffering.

 

Why do people get annoyed when the topic is an animal?


I don't think the topic is or should be one animal.  The real topic and the real problem here is the sad state of affairs in many African countries where wars rage and brutality is a way of life.  Corrupt governments live and thrive off of the suffering of people and animals.  There is outrage toward one person--when the outrage should be about what is going on there to allow this as well as the suffering and murder of millions.  

So what I don't understand is the outrage and hatred of one man--and not about the system. Why doesn't the news and the posts focus on the real reason this happened?  Do people really think the outrage toward this dentist does any good?  The people that profit from it are laughing all the way to the bank. I'm sorry but I have a problem with the way we get yanked around by the news to up readership when the real problems aren't talked about.  So I "vented" that here.  I hope I didn't offend anyone, but that's my soapbox minute and I'll shut up and not reply any more.  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,426
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@Sooner wrote:

@caravaggio wrote:

@Sooner wrote:

I think what some are trying to point out here is that there seems to be more outrage over this than over the killing, starvation and abuse of people in many places on that continent.  There are so many horriffic things that happen to people there, and perhaps that should be noted as well when this topic comes up.  That is something we can so something about too.  There are many aid groups and religious organizations there trying to help the human suffering on a one to one basis.

 

Somehow it seems callous to be talking about this and not to mention that as well.  


Why?Do you not have ability to give attention to more then one cause or concern? Animal activist on this board never go out of there way to bring up the suffereing of animals on threads about human suffereing so why do you feel the need to go off topic  and do that?

 

Again my mantra is we are supposed to be the Stewards of this World.

 

That is for the innocents who can not speak. Including animals who suffer the most regardless of what you may think. Millions of livestock are slaughtered everyday. But that is OK because we are consumers right? So if time is spent talking about the horrific death of one animal try to not soapbox all the human suffereing that goes on as well. We got a thread for that  and you are welcome to share your thoughts. I think as a  human it is in our nature and capacity to want to help the suffering.

 

Why do people get annoyed when the topic is an animal?


I don't think the topic is or should be one animal.  The real topic and the real problem here is the sad state of affairs in many African countries where wars rage and brutality is a way of life.  Corrupt governments live and thrive off of the suffering of people and animals.  There is outrage toward one person--when the outrage should be about what is going on there to allow this as well as the suffering and murder of millions.  

So what I don't understand is the outrage and hatred of one man--and not about the system. Why doesn't the news and the posts focus on the real reason this happened?  Do people really think the outrage toward this dentist does any good?  The people that profit from it are laughing all the way to the bank. I'm sorry but I have a problem with the way we get yanked around by the news to up readership when the real problems aren't talked about.  So I "vented" that here.  I hope I didn't offend anyone, but that's my soapbox minute and I'll shut up and not reply any more.  


Others who have stated similar post seem to think this outrage is over one man or just the horrific murder of one animal. Cecil  was in a place and being studied to better understand and help animals in the wild against poachers and hunters. People seem to forget that. He was where he was to better the lives of animals and with that people.

 

That being said you have a right to vent as anyone does. It is understandable that it may not be on your radar but if it was you would see the help that has been going on to help the people and wild life in these poor countries that depend on this for their livelyhood. To give them other means of income so that these animals are not killed off.

 

The media has latched onto this story but there are thousands of people world wide that have been working and knew how important Cecil was prior to his brutal murder.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 34,427
Registered: ‎06-11-2011

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@suzyQ3 wrote:

@MarieIG wrote:

No.

 

I was tipped over quite a while ago due to the hunting of elephants. 

 

These intelligent animals are frequently hunted for their tusks.  The countries which are lucky enough to have these wonderful animals have to be primarily responsible to protect them both from local hunters which unfortunately seem to run rampant, as well as trophy hunters. 


I have a particular passion for elephants. My husband told me today that he read that some are painting the elephants' tusk with pink paint to make them not useful to those who hunt them for their tusks. Interesting.


I'm not sure how useful a deterrant that is -- paint can be easily removed, or even sanded off with plenty of tusk left.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,112
Registered: ‎12-08-2014

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@Pearlee wrote:

@suzyQ3 wrote:

@MarieIG wrote:

No.

 

I was tipped over quite a while ago due to the hunting of elephants. 

 

These intelligent animals are frequently hunted for their tusks.  The countries which are lucky enough to have these wonderful animals have to be primarily responsible to protect them both from local hunters which unfortunately seem to run rampant, as well as trophy hunters. 


I have a particular passion for elephants. My husband told me today that he read that some are painting the elephants' tusk with pink paint to make them not useful to those who hunt them for their tusks. Interesting.


I'm not sure how useful a deterrant that is -- paint can be easily removed, or even sanded off with plenty of tusk left.

 

Elephants are extremely intelligent.  I'm pretty sure smelly, pink paint on their tusks would be nothing short of torture for them.   


 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,208
Registered: ‎04-27-2015

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@Chrystaltree wrote:

No Cecil is not a tipping point; the story has already lost it's legs.  It captured everyone's hearts because it's summer and there wasn't much news and he's a lion.  Everyone loves lions, king of the beasts.  It surprised us all that a protected animal like that could become a victim of hunters.  But nothing has changed and nothing will change.  The companies that arrange those slaughter tours and the local guides probably will be less concerned with satistying the requests of weathly hunters who want their trophy kills and they will follow the local laws and regulations...for a while.  Those countries need the income that hunting provides.  I do think that there will come a time when blood sports will come to an end.  This Cecil incident was one very small step toward that.  But....as the saying goes....a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.  Or something like that. 


 

WRONG.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,919
Registered: ‎08-31-2010

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?

[ Edited ]

Great article in the WSJ about trophy hunting saving the lions because it can destroy the market for poachers.  It also helps control the damage lions do to livestock populations.  Tons of info in there.

 

John Stossel has always spoken about saving tigers the same way bison were saved--by inserting the profit motive.  

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Regular Contributor
Posts: 166
Registered: ‎08-27-2013

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?

Bravo to you! I couldn't have expressed more eloquently.  Other creatures besides us have as much right to exist as we do. I hope we  are getting it, we seem to be many of us...that as the earth and it's life goes so do we.  We live on such beautiful, awe inspiring planet with so many incredible forms of life.  As humans it is our resposibility to treat it well, that's dominion over the earth not to abuse at our ẃhim. This is the only place we have, treat it reverently.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,612
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Is Cecil a tipping point?


@PamfromCT wrote:

Absolutely.

 

To some, the killing of Cecil was a minor incident.  I'll go out on a limb here, prepared for some attacks:  If anyone has a heart, the killing of Cecil was a horrific incident.  It also shines a bright light on the practice of trophy hunting.  Often if a "face" can be put on a problem, it becomes more real to people and thus inspires an outcry for action.

 

I have used the analogy of Rosa Parks wanting to sit on a bus.  Wasn't that the spark that ignited the civil rights movement?  Many thought discrimination was wrong for a long time, but this incident certainly was a spur for action.

 

No, nothing changes completely overnight.  It takes time and effort, but the opportunity for change has begun and will evolve.

 

"The millstones of the gods grind exceedingly slow but exceedingly fine."


Exactly. A perfect example of a tipping point, a spark that starts something greater. Thank you, @PamfromCT

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