Reply
Super Contributor
Posts: 1,288
Registered: ‎11-08-2011

International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Can you name some inspiring historical female women?

For me, I will start with Arabella (Babb) Mansfield. She was the first women to be admitted to a US Bar. In 1896 she was admitted to the Iowa bar. It was her court case that allowed women into this State's bar.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 11,367
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Margaret Thatcher

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,954
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony - all the suffragettes who worked so hard for women to have the right to vote. It was the Voting Rights Act of it's time - and gave the vote to us all.

Super Contributor
Posts: 2,916
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Anne Frank

George Sand

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,287
Registered: ‎01-24-2013

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Notorious Ruth Bader Ginsberg.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,210
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Katherine Johnson'Today is International Women's Day, and we're going to spend it commemorating all of the amazing women in science that you should have heard of, but may not have. #womenyoushouldhaveheardof'

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,210
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1944, and invented the first compiler for a computer programming language.She popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term "debugging" for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace".The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 "Hopper" supercomputer at NERSC.

from wiki

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,287
Registered: ‎01-24-2013

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Henrietta Lacks

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,454
Registered: ‎01-13-2013

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Mrs. Billy Graham

1920 - 2007

Ruth Bell was born June 10, 1920, in Qingjiang, Kiangsu, China, the daughter of medical missionaries L. Nelson and Virginia Leftwich Bell. She attended high school in Pyongyang, (now North) Korea. She first came to the United States at the age of seven, while her parents were on furlough. She returned to the United States at the age of 17 to attend Wheaton College in Wheaton, Ill. Shortly after his arrival on campus, she was introduced to “Preacher,” the nickname other students gave the strapping Billy Graham from Charlotte, North Carolina. They were married in August 1943, following their graduating together that June.

Between 1945 and 1958, Mrs. Graham gave birth to five children, whom she raised—sometimes single-handedly—while her husband was away on extended national and international evangelistic crusades. The three daughters and two sons who survive her are all actively involved in ministry, including eldest son Franklin, who heads the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA) founded by his father.

“My father would not have been what he is today if it wasn’t for my mother,” Franklin said. “She stood strong for what was biblically correct and accurate. She would help my father prepare his messages, listening with an attentive ear, and if she saw something that wasn’t right or heard something that she felt wasn’t as strong as it could be, she was a voice to strengthen this or eliminate that. Every person needs that kind of input in their life, and she was that to my father.”

In 1959, Mrs. Graham published her first book, Our Christmas Story, an illustrated volume for children. She went on to write or co-author 13 other books, many of them works of poetry she wrote as an emotional release while her husband was so often on the road through the years.

“I don’t believe Mother has adequately been recognized and honored for what she had done; because, without her, Daddy’s ministry would not have been possible,” said Ruth Graham, youngest daughter—and namesake—regarding her mother’s influence and partnership in her father’s ministry.

“How does one live with one of the world’s most famous men?” daughter Ruth continued. “God began training my mother for this position years ago in China. Her parents exercised a profound effect upon the development of her character, and laid the foundations for who she was. What she witnessed in her family home, she practiced for herself—dependence on God in every circumstance, love for His Word, concern for others above self, and an indomitable spirit displayed with a smile.

“Her happiness and fulfillment did not depend on her circumstances,” the younger Ruth concluded. “She was a lovely, beautiful, and wise woman, because early in life she made Christ her home, her purpose, her center, her confidant, and her vision.”

Mrs. Graham’s significant role in Mr. Graham’s ministry was recognized in 1996, when they were jointly awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in a special ceremony in the Capital Rotunda in Washington, which reflected a consensus of love and support from all branches of government in attendance.

Ruth Graham was always a vital part of Mr. Graham’s evangelistic career, and he turned to her for advice and input about many ministry decisions. One of the early uses of media by the BGEA was the “Hour of Decision” radio program begun in 1950, which she named. After her upbringing in China and high school experience in Korea, she continued to have a burden for the people of Asia. She encouraged her husband to visit and later accompanied him during his historic visits to the People’s Republic of China.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 609
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: International Women's Day - Inspiring Women in History

Harriet Tubman

Born: c. 1820, Dorchester County, Maryland
Died: March 10, 1913, Auburn, New York

Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people." Over the course of 10 years, and at great personal risk, she led hundreds of slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad, a secret network of safe houses where runaway slaves could stay on their journey north to freedom. She later became a leader in the abolitionist movement, and during the Civil War she was a spy for the federal forces in South Carolina as well as a nurse.