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Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,035
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

I love young people and will try (till the day I drop) to communicate with them. 99% of the people I talk to on a daily basis, I understand quite well. It's only here that occasionally I need to re-read something, due to atrocious spelling or poor sentence structure.🤣😉

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,063
Registered: ‎03-29-2015

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

[ Edited ]

@Trinity11 wrote:

I love young people and will try (till the day I drop) to communicate with them. 99% of the people I talk to on a daily basis, I understand quite well. It's only here that occasionally I need to re-read something, due to atrocious spelling or poor sentence structure.🤣😉


But don't you dare call a poster out for spelling or grammar errors.  You will be told off and sent to the back of the room.  Smiley LOL

Honored Contributor
Posts: 33,242
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English


@Lakelife62 wrote:

Interesting topic!

If you Google "words and phrases coined over the last century", there are several interesting articles that illustrate how our language has changed over the years. We don't use words like "jolly" "blotto" and "fancy" any longer- we say "happy", "drunk", "want" these days. Hundreds and hundreds of words and phrases are added to the dictionary every year.

Interesting to see new words and phrases added as society and (mainly) technology changes. It's not a plot to leave anyone out, it's the natural evolution of experiences put into language.


@Lakelife62 I get that.  Words change.  I'm talking about use of initials, abbreviations, and such.  Things that aren't words.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,449
Registered: ‎11-03-2018

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

We have one poster here who intentionally misspells and stated professional people spell phonetically.  That is more bothersome than using initials.  

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,508
Registered: ‎05-09-2023

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English


@Sooner wrote:

@Lakelife62 wrote:

Interesting topic!

If you Google "words and phrases coined over the last century", there are several interesting articles that illustrate how our language has changed over the years. We don't use words like "jolly" "blotto" and "fancy" any longer- we say "happy", "drunk", "want" these days. Hundreds and hundreds of words and phrases are added to the dictionary every year.

Interesting to see new words and phrases added as society and (mainly) technology changes. It's not a plot to leave anyone out, it's the natural evolution of experiences put into language.


@Lakelife62 I get that.  Words change.  I'm talking about use of initials, abbreviations, and such.  Things that aren't words.


Those are now words.

ETA

IIRC

LMAO

These and many more are part of the modern lexicon and are also included in the dictionary. If I come across something and I can't find it in a tradtional dictionary, I'll check Urban Dictionary and it's usually there. Though sometimes I wish I didn't know what some things meant! Smiley Wink

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,276
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

I am 68, still working full time and do not consider myself old.  My mom died at 92 and she STILL wouldn't succumb to the phrase of being old.  She "hung out" with us girls and was more like an older sister.

 

While I only use some of the word abbreviations, I typically speak my plain old Baltimorese...works for me.  One I do love is "merch" for merchandise - cracks me up.

Script is always used by medical personnel.  

 

My mom used her generation slang allllll the time!  We in the 70's did too.  It's a fad like everything else.  Hardly a code...

 

know what I'm sayin

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,508
Registered: ‎05-09-2023

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English


@bmorechick wrote:

I am 68, still working full time and do not consider myself old.  My mom died at 92 and she STILL wouldn't succumb to the phrase of being old.  She "hung out" with us girls and was more like an older sister.

 

While I only use some of the word abbreviations, I typically speak my plain old Baltimorese...works for me.  One I do love is "merch" for merchandise - cracks me up.

Script is always used by medical personnel.  

 

My mom used her generation slang allllll the time!  We in the 70's did too.  It's a fad like everything else.  Hardly a code...

 

know what I'm sayin


Right on! Fo shizzle my nizzle! Woman LOL

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,258
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

Many times you can know what someone is talking about from the sentence it is used in or the context of the discussion.

 

For example "Remember those days when you would get a written script or it would be received over the phone by the pharmacist?" You know from the context "script" means "prescription", even if you don't abbreviate.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,667
Registered: ‎10-09-2023

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English

I think the intitals for things are harder to comrephend sometimes. For instance, SMH or DD, DH or LMAO. Yes, I know what they are but it did take a minute or possible a google.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 20,708
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

Re: I Don't Speak What Passes for English


@Iwantcoffee wrote:

Many times you can know what someone is talking about from the sentence it is used in or the context of the discussion.

 

For example "Remember those days when you would get a written script or it would be received over the phone by the pharmacist?" You know from the context "script" means "prescription", even if you don't abbreviate.


I didn't realize what the poster was talking about until I read the body of that post.

 

At first glance of the title, I thought it had been put in the wrong category, and should have been in "TV and Movies".😂