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Honored Contributor
Posts: 33,826
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

[ Edited ]

@Irshgrl31201 wrote:

@Spurt wrote:

Here is the full link with a lot more photos......

 

http://menzelphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Hungry-Planet-Family-Food-Portraits/G0000zmgWvU6Si...

 

 

And many of the European Countries, Canada, Austrailia, western cultures also have processed food But I dont think its fair to show 2 families and say this is how everyone in that country eats.....My mom is shaking her head from heaven looking at the groceries from the so called western cultures when she spent so much time in effort on balanced nurtrition.fresh healthy foods.....

 

A lot of people just dont want to take the time and effort to prepare a healthy meal from scratch using fresh ingredients w/o preservatives with fresh fruits/vegtables etc...sadly its a change in society to the fast and easy....but probably more health issues in the future because of processed foods with hidden sugars, chemical preservatives etc etc

 

I think its kinda funny that even in photos with healthier food....gotta have that soft drink......(you wont see me drinking that qwap!)
 

 


I totally agree with you @Spurt. I think that is what it comes down to more than anything. When I was starting out, I was at the poverty level, a single mom who worked a lot. I spent Sundays fixing our meals for the week and freezing them. I made lots of soups and stews with tons of veggies, lentils and other legumes. Instead of fresh fruit and veg, I bought frozen which I have read is actually higher in nutrients than fresh if it has been sitting around, it loses them every day. They were certainly cheaper. I shopped the sales and made  our menu around that. To say that poor people can't eat healthy is not factual. It is a choice. No, you can't buy tons of fresh veggies unless you get them on sale but you can buy frozen and incorporate rice, all types of beans and legumes which are good for you. I still shopped the perimeter of the store and didn't include processed foods in our diet. 

 

I have friends of all economic levels who eat way healthier than what is pictured but of course I do know there are people who don't eat healthy and eat a lot of processed. 


@Irshgrl31201

 

I concur with what you said. My mom did the same thing as you....and I learned from her.  I do buy both fresh and frozen veggies... 

 

Most of the young co-workers in my office eat fast foods exclusively (and I dont mean at the places that serve salads or healthy offerings---its all fried and greasy)...and they never eat fruits or vegtables.......they are heading towards a catastrophic future with their health.....Now I won't say I'm a health freak I do occasionally indulge in what is considered "unhealthy" offerings....but I make it the exception and not the rule!

Animals are reliable, full of love, true in their affections, grateful. Difficult standards for people to live up to.”
Honored Contributor
Posts: 32,905
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Sooner wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm wrote:

Well for $342 a week spent on groceries, the American family made some pretty darn bad choices for food.

 

That is not poverty level at any means.  Just bad food choices.


@Lucky Charm yes the food choices are bad.  However, we don't know their yearly household income for a family of four to say they are not at poverty level.  You nor I would have no way of knowing if their income threshold is below $24,600 for a family of four.  That amount is the poverty threshold for a family of four in 2017.


If they are at poverty level, they are spending over 71% of their income on poor food choices.

 

Look at all that soda, juice, chips, a lot of take-out.  Look closely.

 

Hardly anything in all that is good for you.  That's close to $300 worth of poor nutrition. 

 

I can only hope that since they were part of this project, they can walk away knowing they need to turn the ship around. 

 

It's not expensive or labor intensive to make healthy meals for $342/week for a family of 4. 

 

Not hard at all.

 

 

 

 You'd have to understand why poor people shop the way they do.  You don't understand so you can only speak to what you understand.  Wonder why it  is then that one of the states with the highest group of poor people also have high rates obese people?  The state that I refer  to is Mississippi.

 

There is a lot involved in terms of socio economics and region.

 

Did you know that Urban areas that have a large concentration of minorities have a higher proportion of take out food (fast food) restaurants than other communities?  It's true.  Do you wonder why? 

 

If we are going to discuss health and eating we must look at all facets that play a role in choices made.  That includes availability of fresh food; ability to purchase said fresh food; replenishing fresh food regularly and more.  This whole are is a study unto itself.

 

There is a lot to think about here.  Pictures don't tell it all.  


If a community has more fast food places than other communities, it means that a greater proportion of that community buys the fast food.  Economics tell you that.  Fast food locates where fast food sells most.

 

I grew up in a very poor area and people ate beans, cornbread and beans for a heck of a lot of meals.  That's cheaper and healthier than fast food.  People make choices about how they spend time and money, and a lot of that is up to us as consumers.  I'm not saying that because I make great choices.  I'm just stating a fact. 

 

Food was a big deal where I grew up, and almost everyone gardened and also hunted and fished and NOT for the sport of it.  There was no throwing back of fish around there!  They were breaded and fried!  NOT the best choice but BOY were they good! 

 

Hunger is a terrible thing, but not always are bad choices about money. 


@Sooner, it would seem that way, but that's not how it works.  Those very same communities don't get the Supermarkets to even have OPTIONS to make these choices.  I know to some it sounds like "common sense" but it's more to it than that.  Much of it has nothing to do with the residents of a given community.

 

If we want a better understanding of what takes place here, and abroad (as I provided some links to peer reviewed articles) the place to start is by reading this from a socio economic aspect (even a little urban planning).

 

 


@itiswhatitis  So just what is your point here?  What are you getting at?  Spell it out for us please.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 32,905
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@Spurt wrote:

Here is the full link with a lot more photos......

 

http://menzelphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Hungry-Planet-Family-Food-Portraits/G0000zmgWvU6Si...

 

 

And many of the European Countries, Canada, Austrailia, western cultures also have processed food But I dont think its fair to show 2 families and say this is how everyone in that country eats.....My mom is shaking her head from heaven looking at the groceries from the so called western cultures when she spent so much time in effort on balanced nurtrition.fresh healthy foods.....

 

A lot of people just dont want to take the time and effort to prepare a healthy meal from scratch using fresh ingredients w/o preservatives with fresh fruits/vegtables etc...sadly its a change in society to the fast and easy....but probably more health issues in the future because of processed foods with hidden sugars, chemical preservatives etc etc

 

I think its kinda funny that even in photos with healthier food....gotta have that soft drink......(you wont see me drinking that qwap!)
 

 


We all choose what quap we eat--and I don't know anyone who doesn't have any vices whether food or exercise or something.  Funny thing, all the healthy people died too--some of them WAY sooner than the "unhealthy" people.  In my father's family, the apple shaped ones outlived the tall thin ones TO A PERSON by 10 years.  The biggest health nut I know died at 62.

 

You can do things that may or may not improve your health, but genes play a huge part, as does stress, and simply how and were you live.  There are no guarantees, and I'm not sure health of lonb livd is not as much a blessing as an action we might take. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,065
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

@Itiswhatitis  The family you and I were discussing (NC) obviously shops in a grocery store.  Not a convenience store.

 

8 bottles of juice, about 12 pouches of Capri Sun (I'll bet you that the sugar per serving in the juices are at least 19 grams) 4 packets of Koolaid (sugar sugar sugar), 2-2 litres of Soda and at least one 12 pack of diet Coke.  Not to mention the 3 large fountain sodas. 

 

Majorly low-balling what was spent on all those sugary drinks is at least $25--could have been spent on better breakfast choices for sure.

 

Look what those kids are given for breakfast.  I see a box of cereal under the candy bars and next to the four bags of chips.  Are Pop Tarts for breakfast? 

 

That's grocery store shopping for sure, they didn't even go for store brand to save money.  They did buy items to save time (Ramen noodles, hot pockets, pre made meatballs, jarred spaghetti sauce).

 

If that's the way they're eating, they will be in trouble down the road.  Like I said, I hope the parents take a step back and look at what they've been a part of and realize they need to change their shopping habits and in a big way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@Sooner wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Sooner wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm wrote:

Well for $342 a week spent on groceries, the American family made some pretty darn bad choices for food.

 

That is not poverty level at any means.  Just bad food choices.


@Lucky Charm yes the food choices are bad.  However, we don't know their yearly household income for a family of four to say they are not at poverty level.  You nor I would have no way of knowing if their income threshold is below $24,600 for a family of four.  That amount is the poverty threshold for a family of four in 2017.


If they are at poverty level, they are spending over 71% of their income on poor food choices.

 

Look at all that soda, juice, chips, a lot of take-out.  Look closely.

 

Hardly anything in all that is good for you.  That's close to $300 worth of poor nutrition. 

 

I can only hope that since they were part of this project, they can walk away knowing they need to turn the ship around. 

 

It's not expensive or labor intensive to make healthy meals for $342/week for a family of 4. 

 

Not hard at all.

 

 

 

 You'd have to understand why poor people shop the way they do.  You don't understand so you can only speak to what you understand.  Wonder why it  is then that one of the states with the highest group of poor people also have high rates obese people?  The state that I refer  to is Mississippi.

 

There is a lot involved in terms of socio economics and region.

 

Did you know that Urban areas that have a large concentration of minorities have a higher proportion of take out food (fast food) restaurants than other communities?  It's true.  Do you wonder why? 

 

If we are going to discuss health and eating we must look at all facets that play a role in choices made.  That includes availability of fresh food; ability to purchase said fresh food; replenishing fresh food regularly and more.  This whole are is a study unto itself.

 

There is a lot to think about here.  Pictures don't tell it all.  


If a community has more fast food places than other communities, it means that a greater proportion of that community buys the fast food.  Economics tell you that.  Fast food locates where fast food sells most.

 

I grew up in a very poor area and people ate beans, cornbread and beans for a heck of a lot of meals.  That's cheaper and healthier than fast food.  People make choices about how they spend time and money, and a lot of that is up to us as consumers.  I'm not saying that because I make great choices.  I'm just stating a fact. 

 

Food was a big deal where I grew up, and almost everyone gardened and also hunted and fished and NOT for the sport of it.  There was no throwing back of fish around there!  They were breaded and fried!  NOT the best choice but BOY were they good! 

 

Hunger is a terrible thing, but not always are bad choices about money. 


@Sooner, it would seem that way, but that's not how it works.  Those very same communities don't get the Supermarkets to even have OPTIONS to make these choices.  I know to some it sounds like "common sense" but it's more to it than that.  Much of it has nothing to do with the residents of a given community.

 

If we want a better understanding of what takes place here, and abroad (as I provided some links to peer reviewed articles) the place to start is by reading this from a socio economic aspect (even a little urban planning).

 

 


@itiswhatitis  So just what is your point here?  What are you getting at?  Spell it out for us please.


@Sooner, if I have to......

 

Socio economic factors play a significant role in what we eat.  PERIOD.  SIMPLE.  It's part of the issue but not all.  This is for EVERY INDIVIDUAL in this country and others that determine their access to what is deemed quality/healthy food.

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats

@Lucky Charm, I don't doubt that.  I'm not talking about what they purchased or how healthy it appears.  I'm talking about the comparison of what food choices some economic levels have while their more well off neighbors have more choices.

 

I said nothing about sugary drinks or soda.  I said nothing about whether they are good for you or not.  I said nothing about the fast food offerings they chose.

 

My point, and then I'll end here is the talk about what Americans consume.  Some of the poorest people in our country are obese and there is a reason that goes beyond drinking and eating unhealthy foods.  Part of it has to do with their access to nutritional food.

*Call Tyrone*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,065
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm, I don't doubt that.  I'm not talking about what they purchased or how healthy it appears.  I'm talking about the comparison of what food choices some economic levels have while their more well off neighbors have more choices.

 

I said nothing about sugary drinks or soda.  I said nothing about whether they are good for you or not.  I said nothing about the fast food offerings they chose.

 

My point, and then I'll end here is the talk about what Americans consume.  Some of the poorest people in our country are obese and there is a reason that goes beyond drinking and eating unhealthy foods.  Part of it has to do with their access to nutritional food.


Okay whatitis, we aren't on the same page then. I was going by the picture of the groceries bought and how much was spent.

 

Seems the lower income level familes pictured didn't bother to buy *junk*, just the necessities (whole food). 

 

I wonder if these people also had fast food places and ordered cheap hamburgers, would they wash it down with a fountain soda or a bottle of water?  Water I can only hope.

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@Lucky Charm wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm, I don't doubt that.  I'm not talking about what they purchased or how healthy it appears.  I'm talking about the comparison of what food choices some economic levels have while their more well off neighbors have more choices.

 

I said nothing about sugary drinks or soda.  I said nothing about whether they are good for you or not.  I said nothing about the fast food offerings they chose.

 

My point, and then I'll end here is the talk about what Americans consume.  Some of the poorest people in our country are obese and there is a reason that goes beyond drinking and eating unhealthy foods.  Part of it has to do with their access to nutritional food.


Okay whatitis, we aren't on the same page then. I was going by the picture of the groceries bought and how much was spent.

 

Seems the lower income level familes pictured didn't bother to buy *junk*, just the necessities (whole food). 

 

I wonder if these people also had fast food places and ordered cheap hamburgers, would they wash it down with a fountain soda or a bottle of water?  Water I can only hope.

 

 


@Lucky Charm, I tried to impart on the discussion the "why" as opposed to the what.  If we want to understand patterns and behaviors (including food choices) we need to know the whys.  I posted quite a few articles that may play a significant role in food choices (aside from I just prefer junk theories).

 

I saw these pics and there are many more families from different regions who have food items that are just as questionable.  I read the whole article.

*Call Tyrone*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,488
Registered: ‎04-18-2013

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Lucky Charm, I don't doubt that.  I'm not talking about what they purchased or how healthy it appears.  I'm talking about the comparison of what food choices some economic levels have while their more well off neighbors have more choices.

 

I said nothing about sugary drinks or soda.  I said nothing about whether they are good for you or not.  I said nothing about the fast food offerings they chose.

 

My point, and then I'll end here is the talk about what Americans consume.  Some of the poorest people in our country are obese and there is a reason that goes beyond drinking and eating unhealthy foods.  Part of it has to do with their access to nutritional food.


Okay whatitis, we aren't on the same page then. I was going by the picture of the groceries bought and how much was spent.

 

Seems the lower income level familes pictured didn't bother to buy *junk*, just the necessities (whole food). 

 

I wonder if these people also had fast food places and ordered cheap hamburgers, would they wash it down with a fountain soda or a bottle of water?  Water I can only hope.

 

 


@Lucky Charm, I tried to impart on the discussion the "why" as opposed to the what.  If we want to understand patterns and behaviors (including food choices) we need to know the whys.  I posted quite a few articles that may play a significant role in food choices (aside from I just prefer junk theories).

 

I saw these pics and there are many more families from different regions who have food items that are just as questionable.  I read the whole article.


While I totally understand that fresh food choices are not available to many in poorer communities (and I know of groups that are working to change that), for a great number of people their food choices are based on a very simiple criteria - they LIKE them.  Of course, that brings up the issues of food "manufacturers" and their use of high amounts of salt, sugar and fat to make them taste good and to hook people on them.

 

But I suppose that's a different topic.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,829
Registered: ‎03-18-2010

Re: Hungry Planet: What the World Eats


@sidsmom wrote:

@Spurt wrote:

@sidsmom@Irshgrl31201

 

Most recent studies are saying sugar is the bigger culprit rather than fat---there are good fats you need....doctors are now saying sugar is more of a risk factor to heart disease than high cholesteral. More and more doctors are speaking out on this........


Someone can reference all the recent studies they wish

(and one should question who sponsors or funds

these 'recent findings' for what financial gain),

but the fact is history, thoroughout millennia in all cultures

around the world, proves a low fat diet reigns supreme

for longevity & health....and more importantly for satiation & 

long-term weight control.  

 

Calorie Density.  It's a simple as that.

Fat are nutritionally 'expensive.'

Not a good dietary investment.

We only need 10-20% of our daily calories in fat...and most of that

can be obtained naturally with beans, greens, fruit, veg & starches. 

I want to eat as much food as I can for as little calories.

 

 


These studies that have been referenced over and over are independent. You are dead wrong that a low fat diet is more satiating. Fat is very important for satiating hunger and more overweight children and adults eat high carb low fat diets than any other group. There have been studies proving that not only among adults but also children that those who eat a healthy diet with good fats are less likely to be hungry than those who eat a low fat diet. Fat is very important in signaling the brain that you are full and staying full longer. 

 

There is more proof that kind of diet is more healthy than the ones you propose. Fats are important for overall physical and mental health as well as heart health. 

 

 

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.
JFK