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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,813
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

I have an old tv in my office. It is over 20 years old. The VCR on it no longer works and I kind of held onto it for the VCR. I would love to get rid of it but I don't have a forklift to get the thing out of the house. It is soooo bulky and heavy. My grandkids laugh at it everytime they see it. The good thing is I don't watch tv much. It has become a badge of honor. That tv and I will be together until death do us part! Smiley Happy
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


hckynut wrote:

itiswhatitis wrote:

Most of us have some sort of electronic gadget (I guess).  If we did not, I don't think we could communicate here.

 

How long do you think these items (recorders, tv's, radios, video games, etc.,) should last?  I was talking to a neighbor who was telling me her woes about a flat screen tv she bought about a year going blank.  I shared similar frustration with her, though my experience didn't deliver a blank screen.  It just shut off when it wanted to and I couldn't turn it on until it was ready to do so.  Yes, I put up with that for a while.  She was trying to figure if she should have it repaired or if it was worth dumping it.  It is out of warranty now, and this her dilemma.

 

Is  planned obsolescence a good thing for consumers in the long run, or is it just old fashioned greed?


 

 

@itiswhatitis

 

Too many variables, starting with brands/models/hours of use, and of course, "abuse", whether through negligence or otherwise. 

 

All electronics in this era are using much different components than decades of the past. Part of this is a good thing, and part of it, not so much. "Planned obsolescence"? As an electronic geek, I don't see that as even being possible, much less something any manufacturing company would want to see on "their brand's reliability and dependability", as viewed by consumers.

 

I've on tons of electronics, many most "normal" people didn't even know existed. An estimate for me would be that 95 to 100% of them were both reliable and dependable, and also lived up to the hype of their era.

 

Some electronics, as far as repair or replace, to me is very similar to motor vehicles, just not as expensive. At some point with an older vehicle, most people wonder, "I am putting bad money after bad money into this vehicle"?  Would I be money wise to use that money to buy a new, or newer vehicle?

 

There is no "pat" answer to your question. I personally buy brand names in electronics that I have known and/or owned for years, many for decades. I have many electronic audio devices, still working with all the same functions as when new, and a couple of them I bought in the 1970's.

 

This is my opinion based on my decades of owning many brands/models, and following the world of electronics since the mid 1950's. My opinion is what I base all of my purchases of any electronic before I put down my money.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)


@hckynut, thanks for sharing.  Yes there are many variables but brands are not included in those variables.  I say this because most components and parts are manufactured by a few companies for the many.  This is also true of household appliances like refrigerators.  

 

I recall at least Sears' Kenmore applicances being made by many other manufacturers.  In addition, there are some smaller brands that do outsource their component parts, which makes it hard for them to control the quality since most of it is done overseas.

 

Anyway, planned obseclence exists.  How often companies actually use this method to produce consumer goods is a different story.  Twenty to thirty years ago a television set lasted seems like forever, until the picture tube went out.  Then having it fixed was not as costly as buying a new one.  

 

I have this issue with printers.  They are throw aways once they go bad.  Just buy a new one......

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


CelticCrafter wrote:

We had a Vizio that was about 4-5 years old, it would suddenly get really loud and then turn itself off and back on again or it would go mute or sometimes it sounded like someone talking through the back of a running fan.

 

We replaced it a couple months ago.


@CelticCrafter, yes that's the problem I had with the LG I had (turning off).  I did some research when I was having the problem and the complaints were/are astounding.

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,978
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

5  years

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,863
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


itiswhatitis wrote:

hckynut wrote 

 

@itiswhatitis

 

Too many variables, starting with brands/models/hours of use, and of course, "abuse", whether through negligence or otherwise. 

 

All electronics in this era are using much different components than decades of the past. Part of this is a good thing, and part of it, not so much. "Planned obsolescence"? As an electronic geek, I don't see that as even being possible, much less something any manufacturing company would want to see on "their brand's reliability and dependability", as viewed by consumers.

 

I've on tons of electronics, many most "normal" people didn't even know existed. An estimate for me would be that 95 to 100% of them were both reliable and dependable, and also lived up to the hype of their era.

 

Some electronics, as far as repair or replace, to me is very similar to motor vehicles, just not as expensive. At some point with an older vehicle, most people wonder, "I am putting bad money after bad money into this vehicle"?  Would I be money wise to use that money to buy a new, or newer vehicle?

 

There is no "pat" answer to your question. I personally buy brand names in electronics that I have known and/or owned for years, many for decades. I have many electronic audio devices, still working with all the same functions as when new, and a couple of them I bought in the 1970's.

 

This is my opinion based on my decades of owning many brands/models, and following the world of electronics since the mid 1950's. My opinion is what I base all of my purchases of any electronic before I put down my money.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)


@hckynut, thanks for sharing.  Yes there are many variables but brands are not included in those variables.  I say this because most components and parts are manufactured by a few companies for the many.  This is also true of household appliances like refrigerators.  

 

I recall at least Sears' Kenmore applicances being made by many other manufacturers.  In addition, there are some smaller brands that do outsource their component parts, which makes it hard for them to control the quality since most of it is done overseas.

 

Anyway, planned obseclence exists.  How often companies actually use this method to produce consumer goods is a different story.  Twenty to thirty years ago a television set lasted seems like forever, until the picture tube went out.  Then having it fixed was not as costly as buying a new one.  

 

I have this issue with printers.  They are throw aways once they go bad.  Just buy a new one.....

 

 

 

@itiswhatitis

 

I thought you wanted more of an answer than only an opinion. Been quite aware of how many manufacturers make what, and that the same name brand parts are in many generic brands of electronics. Any contrary to your statement: " Yes, but brands are not included in those variables", my experiences over decades of ownership, tell me differently.

 

AMD and Intel make processors but are all of them the same? Of course not, and many they call "quad core", are all quad core processors the same? Of course not. You seem to possess all the pertinent info on these things, which leaves me guessing, why you titled this thread with a question, where it appeared to me you wanted more personal "brand or no brand" experiences by those that decide to add their post to this thread.

 

I will give you a few brands that I have had, and still have, that function exactly as advertised, a couple that are/were way ahead of their time. As I said in my other post, many "non geeks" did/do not even known these technologies were even around 30-40 years ago.

 

Pioneer-a CLD/CAV/12"/8"/3.5"/1" Laser Disc/DVD/CD Player I bought in 1981, digital and analog capabilities.

 

Yamaha-DSP/Quadrophonic (both descrete and synthesized capable)for vinyl(33.3 and 78) and 8 track(descrete only). True surround sound in one format, not the other. Dolby+, minus the 5th channel. Played both analog and digital on any of the above mentioned software choices.

 

Sony-Multi-Room Capable Receiver which also had synthesized capabilities for non-descrete playback and 4 speaker outputs, which I bought in 1972, which I currently use in my depleted once electronically filled home theater/Gym Room, now when exercising.

 

Tv sets? I had a tube type RCA, still working, that I bought in the 1960's, and just recently had to throw away because of our water/mold damaged 2,000' finished basement.

 

I owned 4 DLP Mitsubishi rear projectors, 1 of which that was HD ready that I bought in 1999. I sold each one of them, all working to upgrade to newer Dark Chips as they became available. Not a one of them failed. About 15 months ago sold the last Mitsubishi I owned as they no longer made consumer DLP Models.

 

Summing up my experiences with many brands of many different formats of video from tv sets, I will say from that I conclude our new tv set will last us until I am once again ready to upgrade from our Samsung 4k/HDR/1Connect Box Upgradeable main video source.

 

For the sake of a number, divided by my past tv video experiences, the average is 13 years minimum.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


hckynut wrote:

itiswhatitis wrote:

hckynut wrote 

 

@itiswhatitis

 

Too many variables, starting with brands/models/hours of use, and of course, "abuse", whether through negligence or otherwise. 

 

All electronics in this era are using much different components than decades of the past. Part of this is a good thing, and part of it, not so much. "Planned obsolescence"? As an electronic geek, I don't see that as even being possible, much less something any manufacturing company would want to see on "their brand's reliability and dependability", as viewed by consumers.

 

I've on tons of electronics, many most "normal" people didn't even know existed. An estimate for me would be that 95 to 100% of them were both reliable and dependable, and also lived up to the hype of their era.

 

Some electronics, as far as repair or replace, to me is very similar to motor vehicles, just not as expensive. At some point with an older vehicle, most people wonder, "I am putting bad money after bad money into this vehicle"?  Would I be money wise to use that money to buy a new, or newer vehicle?

 

There is no "pat" answer to your question. I personally buy brand names in electronics that I have known and/or owned for years, many for decades. I have many electronic audio devices, still working with all the same functions as when new, and a couple of them I bought in the 1970's.

 

This is my opinion based on my decades of owning many brands/models, and following the world of electronics since the mid 1950's. My opinion is what I base all of my purchases of any electronic before I put down my money.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)


@hckynut, thanks for sharing.  Yes there are many variables but brands are not included in those variables.  I say this because most components and parts are manufactured by a few companies for the many.  This is also true of household appliances like refrigerators.  

 

I recall at least Sears' Kenmore applicances being made by many other manufacturers.  In addition, there are some smaller brands that do outsource their component parts, which makes it hard for them to control the quality since most of it is done overseas.

 

Anyway, planned obseclence exists.  How often companies actually use this method to produce consumer goods is a different story.  Twenty to thirty years ago a television set lasted seems like forever, until the picture tube went out.  Then having it fixed was not as costly as buying a new one.  

 

I have this issue with printers.  They are throw aways once they go bad.  Just buy a new one.....

 

 

 

@itiswhatitis

 

I thought you wanted more of an answer than only an opinion. Been quite aware of how many manufacturers make what, and that the same name brand parts are in many generic brands of electronics. Any contrary to your statement: " Yes, but brands are not included in those variables", my experiences over decades of ownership, tell me differently.

 

AMD and Intel make processors but are all of them the same? Of course not, and many they call "quad core", are all quad core processors the same? Of course not. You seem to possess all the pertinent info on these things, which leaves me guessing, why you titled this thread with a question, where it appeared to me you wanted more personal "brand or no brand" experiences by those that decide to add their post to this thread.

 

I will give you a few brands that I have had, and still have, that function exactly as advertised, a couple that are/were way ahead of their time. As I said in my other post, many "non geeks" did/do not even known these technologies were even around 30-40 years ago.

 

Pioneer-a CLD/CAV/12"/8"/3.5"/1" Laser Disc/DVD/CD Player I bought in 1981, digital and analog capabilities.

 

Yamaha-DSP/Quadrophonic (both descrete and synthesized capable)for vinyl(33.3 and 78) and 8 track(descrete only). True surround sound in one format, not the other. Dolby+, minus the 5th channel. Played both analog and digital on any of the above mentioned software choices.

 

Sony-Multi-Room Capable Receiver which also had synthesized capabilities for non-descrete playback and 4 speaker outputs, which I bought in 1972, which I currently use in my depleted once electronically filled home theater/Gym Room, now when exercising.

 

Tv sets? I had a tube type RCA, still working, that I bought in the 1960's, and just recently had to throw away because of our water/mold damaged 2,000' finished basement.

 

I owned 4 DLP Mitsubishi rear projectors, 1 of which that was HD ready that I bought in 1999. I sold each one of them, all working to upgrade to newer Dark Chips as they became available. Not a one of them failed. About 15 months ago sold the last Mitsubishi I owned as they no longer made consumer DLP Models.

 

Summing up my experiences with many brands of many different formats of video from tv sets, I will say from that I conclude our new tv set will last us until I am once again ready to upgrade from our Samsung 4k/HDR/1Connect Box Upgradeable main video source.

 

For the sake of a number, divided by my past tv video experiences, the average is 13 years minimum.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)


@hckynut the topic of the discussion is really about planned obselence.  That is, how manufacturers are making products that are MEANT to become outdated much more quickly than in past years.

 

I still have a Panasonic 19 inch tube tv in my home (in the attic) that I've had since before I bought my home.  

 

Brands don't matter to me because all of these newer items are  behaving in the same manner (becoming obselete quicker).  Thus the nature of our technological advances.  It's just there is all.

 

I have my second flat screen in the bedroom which is now a Panasonic.  However, the mother board is made by Samsung. I know this because I did my research on Amazon and it is where I purchased it.   I can tell you for sure, the Panasonic is not as good a tv as my flat screen Samsungs (we have two of those).  The picture doesn't compare.  However, Panasonic is a fine brand.

 

Brands don't really mean that much if the very nature of the item is to become out dated eventually.

 

Just my opinion and my experience.

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,863
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

 

@itiswhatitis

 

You have your experiences and opinion. I have my experiences and opinion. What others choose to do about buying a tv, if from anything we posted, that will be their choice.

 

These are the types of conversations best had face to face, equipment versus equipment, not typing every minute' detail involving the ever changing electronics world I have lived in and followed  for 62 years now. What is the latest today? Then comes tomorrow.

 

But a TV set planned obsolescence? We disagree.If and when I experience or have seen it change, I am always one that is willing to accept it as change.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


hckynut wrote:

 

@itiswhatitis

 

You have your experiences and opinion. I have my experiences and opinion. What others choose to do about buying a tv, if from anything we posted, that will be their choice.

 

These are the types of conversations best had face to face, equipment versus equipment, not typing every minute' detail involving the ever changing electronics world I have lived in and followed  for 62 years now. What is the latest today? Then comes tomorrow.

 

But a TV set planned obsolescence? We disagree.If and when I experience or have seen it change, I am always one that is willing to accept it as change.

 

 

 

hckynut(john)


@hckynut so true.  I didn't ask for anyone's experience in selecting electronics.  I know how to do this myself.  I'm up there in age too.  You didn't say anything that I don't already know.  This was just a discussion about the Twenty First Century way we consume goods and services.  This also encompasses other areas aside from electronics.

 

Minute?  You sure were long winded.....but I enjoyed it.  You read and share or you don't.........

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

What is 'Planned Obsolescence'

Planned obsolescence is a purposefully implemented strategy that ensures the current version of a given product will become out-of-date or useless within a known time period. This guarantees that consumers will demand replacements in the future, thus naturally supporting demand. In some instances, this can even motivate multiple sales of the same object to the same consumer. Obsolescence can be achieved through introduction of a superior replacement or a product design meant to cease proper function within a specific window, or by cultivating desirability of new versions over older ones.

 

BREAKING DOWN 'Planned Obsolescence'

Fashion and technology are known to be popular arenas for planned obsolescence, with stockings and personal electronic devices such as smartphones among the most cited targets of the strategy. It is widely accepted that nylon stockings are designed to ladder, thereby requiring replacement. The replacement cycle for mobile phones has been two to three years, as components begin to wear down and new generations of software or operating systems grow less compatible with the aging hardware. Software is also often designed to include new features and file types that are incompatible with old versions of the program. Automobile manufacturers began rolling out new versions of their models on an annual basis to combat market saturation achieved in the early 20th century.

 

Consumer Reaction

Consumers often react negatively to planned obsolescence, especially if new generations of products offer insufficient improvements over the prior versions. The strategy can be rendered ineffective in highly competitive markets, in which participants may compete on the basis of price or durability. Brands can be tarnished by artificially stoking demand through this method, ultimately driving customers away. However, planned obsolescence doesn't always have such a negative connotation. Companies can engage in this activity solely as a means of controlling costs. For example, a cell phone manufacturer may decide to use parts in its phones that have a maximum lifespan of five years, instead of parts that could last 20 years.

 

Apple’s Planned Obsolescence

Apple Inc. has frequently been at the center of skeptical consumer discourse. The company announced a plan to accept direct payments from iPhone users for hardware that could be exchanged annually. Observers noted the clear intent of the company to shorten the replacement cycle, which was viewed by many as an obvious attempt to stimulate demand at the consumer's expense. Skeptics doubted Apple's ability to engineer meaningful improvements to functionality so quickly, a problem many phone makers already faced with two and three-year replacement cycles.

 

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/planned_obsolescence.asp

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,071
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

Functional Obsolescence
 
 

Functional obsolescence is a reduction in the usefulness or desirability of an object because of an outdated design feature, usually one that cannot be easily changed. The term is commonly used in real estate, but has a wide application.

Functional obsolescence is a factor to consider for a number of reasons and applies to a wide range of situations.

 

BREAKING DOWN 'Functional Obsolescence'In purchasing new products, consumers should consider an item's long-term use in addition to the immediate-term need to mitigate losses from unnecessary purchases resulting from functional obsolescence. An item's functional obsolescence can make it less attractive to buyers if the item does not allow for upgrades or connectivity with new technologies. Items with constantly refreshed design features are also known for their functional obsolescence, since newer models are consistently produced and sold.

 

Home entertainment centers are an example of a consumer good that has been more modernized with new design features. These items have become more functionally obsolete as flat-panel televisions have replaced bulky analog televisions and consumers seek more up-to-date entertainment features. The old entertainment centers of the past are now too deep to accommodate newer thin televisions.

 

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/f/functional-obsolescence.asp

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